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Arizona Territory Cookbook: Recipes from 1864 to 1912 epub download

by Daphne Overstreet


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Arizona Territory Cookbook book. Arizona Territory Cook Book: Recipes from 1864 to 1912. 0914846752 (ISBN13: 9780914846758).

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Arizona Territory Cook Book: Recipes from 1864 to 1912/Daphne Overstreet. The recipes below are offered in our books as examples of traditional Arkansas fare. Hopi Cookery/Juaniti Tiger Kavena. Native Americans foodways Archaeologists can tell us much about what the Pueblo tribes ate in ancient times. Soups, stews, biscuits and cobbler/pot pies are easily rendered in this pot.

The Territory of Arizona (also known as Arizona Territory) was a territory of the United States that existed from February 24, 1863 until February 14, 1912, when the remaining extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the state of Arizona.

The Territory of Arizona (also known as Arizona Territory) was a territory of the United States that existed from February 24, 1863 until February 14, 1912, when the remaining extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the state of Arizona

Arizona Territory Cookbook.

Arizona Territory Cookbook. We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. Arizona territory cookbook. Golden West Cookbooks.

Arizona Territory Cookbook: Recipes from 1864 to 1912. by Daphne Overstreet. Select Format: Plastic Comb. ISBN13:9780914846758.

112 results for arizona cookbook. Arizona Territory Cookbook: Recipes from 1864 to 1912. Best of the Best from Arizona Cookbook.

Results from Google Books. More than 100 recipes from various groups in Arizona Territory. With historical profiles of Pete Kitchen, et. this is the perfect historical food source. EvalineAuerbach Nov 24, 2010.

Arizona Territory pioneers used Dutch ovens, open fires, barbecues and many other methods to overcome the difficulties of cooking on the trail. Authentic recipes from Indians, Cowboys, The Military, Mexicans, Miners and Mormons.

Arizona Territory Cookbook: Recipes from 1864 to 1912 epub download

ISBN13: 978-0914846758

ISBN: 0914846752

Author: Daphne Overstreet

Category: Food and Wine

Subcategory: Regional & International

Language: English

Publisher: Golden West Pub (April 1, 1995)

ePUB size: 1647 kb

FB2 size: 1326 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 863

Other Formats: txt mbr mobi rtf

Related to Arizona Territory Cookbook: Recipes from 1864 to 1912 ePub books

Original
I haven't tried any of the recipes, although it would be possible to do so. However, I bought this book more as a snapshot of the times, to get a better idea of what life was like back then. It is as much a little history book as a recipe book and even though I'm a life-long Arizona resident (as were my father and grandmother) I still learned a couple of interesting facts I hadn't known before as well as being entertained.
Original
I haven't tried any of the recipes, although it would be possible to do so. However, I bought this book more as a snapshot of the times, to get a better idea of what life was like back then. It is as much a little history book as a recipe book and even though I'm a life-long Arizona resident (as were my father and grandmother) I still learned a couple of interesting facts I hadn't known before as well as being entertained.
Voodoolkree
I found this book years ago, and decided not to purchase it. I found it again, and finally purchased it. It's still wonderful. I'm glad I found it here.
Voodoolkree
I found this book years ago, and decided not to purchase it. I found it again, and finally purchased it. It's still wonderful. I'm glad I found it here.
Pad
Interesting but many ingredients are not readily available. Perhaps editors could have included alternatives. Some interesting history though, takes the reader back in time.
Pad
Interesting but many ingredients are not readily available. Perhaps editors could have included alternatives. Some interesting history though, takes the reader back in time.
Celak
Here's a book that will appeal to Southwesterners as those who are fascinated by its history. Organized by social / ethnic groups (Indians, Mexicans, Military, Miners, Mormons -- alliteration mine -- and Cowboys), this foodie tome includes recipes from 1864 to 1912. Overstreet meets expectation with the likes of "Hopi Sprouts," "Cholla Buds" and "Pozole." She credits her sources for many of the recipes. An Alberto Pradeau, for example, is associated with her recipe for Pozole.

Vegetarians will find the book especially valuable for its numerous relatively simple but tasty formulations. Skip the "Son-of-a-Gun Stew" and go directly to the Dutch Oven Rice Pudding with Fruit: 2 cups cold cooked rice, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups dried apricots, peaches or apples, boiling water. Even I might be able to manage that. The author's lone caveat: "Double this recipe for round-up crew of 10-12 men."

But even if you skip past the Mormon "Jerky Gravy" and Lucy Bates' timely "Poverty Cake," you'll be rewarded by Oversteet's stories collected from the likes of Globe's Slim Ellison. Ellison offers his version of an old time cow camp breakfast: ". . . Put in Beef Tallow or lard about 2 in deep . . ." And if that doesn't set you to droolin', check out the opening day menu at Prescott's Juniper Hotel (July 4, 1864), rates at Tombstone's Russ House ($6/week, payable in advance, meals for 25 cents and up in 1886), or preparations for Hardtack: "Cut into pieces about 3 inches square and then punch 16 holes into each piece with a nail. Turn pieces over and punch through again."

Originally published by Pimeria Press in 1975 and reprinted in 1997 by Golden West, the version I purchased was perfect bound. This morsel of a book is out of print, but available here and there for a song and an autographed photo of Brighty of the Grand Canyon poking his nose into a bowl of Navajo Mutton Stew.
Celak
Here's a book that will appeal to Southwesterners as those who are fascinated by its history. Organized by social / ethnic groups (Indians, Mexicans, Military, Miners, Mormons -- alliteration mine -- and Cowboys), this foodie tome includes recipes from 1864 to 1912. Overstreet meets expectation with the likes of "Hopi Sprouts," "Cholla Buds" and "Pozole." She credits her sources for many of the recipes. An Alberto Pradeau, for example, is associated with her recipe for Pozole.

Vegetarians will find the book especially valuable for its numerous relatively simple but tasty formulations. Skip the "Son-of-a-Gun Stew" and go directly to the Dutch Oven Rice Pudding with Fruit: 2 cups cold cooked rice, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups dried apricots, peaches or apples, boiling water. Even I might be able to manage that. The author's lone caveat: "Double this recipe for round-up crew of 10-12 men."

But even if you skip past the Mormon "Jerky Gravy" and Lucy Bates' timely "Poverty Cake," you'll be rewarded by Oversteet's stories collected from the likes of Globe's Slim Ellison. Ellison offers his version of an old time cow camp breakfast: ". . . Put in Beef Tallow or lard about 2 in deep . . ." And if that doesn't set you to droolin', check out the opening day menu at Prescott's Juniper Hotel (July 4, 1864), rates at Tombstone's Russ House ($6/week, payable in advance, meals for 25 cents and up in 1886), or preparations for Hardtack: "Cut into pieces about 3 inches square and then punch 16 holes into each piece with a nail. Turn pieces over and punch through again."

Originally published by Pimeria Press in 1975 and reprinted in 1997 by Golden West, the version I purchased was perfect bound. This morsel of a book is out of print, but available here and there for a song and an autographed photo of Brighty of the Grand Canyon poking his nose into a bowl of Navajo Mutton Stew.