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by James White


All Judgment Fled by James White Sixty million miles from Earth, embroiled in all the perils of First Contact . Galaxy Publishing Corporation. No part of this book may be reproduced.

All Judgment Fled by James White Sixty million miles from Earth, embroiled in all the perils of First Contact, astronauts haven't much time for politicians. or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or me-. chanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any infor

Holding conversation with a half-hour delay between each line of dialogue took some getting used to. Walters, who was tuned to Berryman's suit frequency, said quietly, "The aliens have gone.

Holding conversation with a half-hour delay between each line of dialogue took some getting used to. corridor and interhull space are empty. Berryman says their wounds are painful but so far are not unduly inflamed.

All Judgment Fled book. In such books as Hospital Station and Star Surgeon, James White has built an enviable reputation as a writer of science fiction about the future of medical science and what it may be like to treat and care for a staggering variety of alien life-forms.

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James White was born to a Catholic family in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on 7 April .

James White was born to a Catholic family in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on 7 April 1928, and spent part of his early life in Canada. He was educated in Belfast at St. John's Primary School (1935–1941) and St. Joseph's Technical Secondary School (1942–1943). As a teenager he lived with foster parents. He wanted to study medicine. In 1957, Ace Books published White's first novel, The Secret Visitors, which included locations in Northern Ireland. The book had previously been serialised in New Worlds with the title Tourist Planet.

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The Genocidal Healer By James White. A Del Rey Book BALLANTINE BOOKS Х NEW YORK. Published by Ballantine Books.

The wholesome values and entertaining plots of his writing never disappoint, comparable to the best of Simak, Niven and Leinster. 1968 -/ third place space sf novel -/ wonder award -/ emotion award -/ shock value -/ adventure award. This is an unsung masterpiece of "first contact" science fiction, a most rewarding adventure that you can still find in many used book stores.

All Judgment Fled epub download

ISBN13: 978-0708882221

ISBN: 0708882226

Author: James White

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Futura Publications; New Ed edition (January 1, 2000)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB size: 1343 kb

FB2 size: 1701 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 584

Other Formats: lrf lit azw lrf

Related to All Judgment Fled ePub books

Agrainel
All Judgment Fled (the title is taken from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar) is an entertaining first contact novel. An object following an unnatural path is detected in the vicinity of Mars. Two American ships, each with a crew of three, are sent to investigate. They find an alien ship. It doesn't respond to signals, doesn't seem to be doing anything; its purpose is a mystery. Behaving rather foolishly, some crew members enter the ship and, having damaged their space suits in an encounter with violent but seemingly unintelligent aliens, find themselves stranded inside the ship. Oops!

The story is a study in the psychology of first contact. Three different alien species inhabit the ship. The humans must decide which species are intelligent, which are friendly, and why they're here. The six crew members (four astronauts, two in training) are selected more for their ability to survive the trip than for their expertise. The story's primary focus is on McCullough, whose medical background makes him the unofficial expert in the psychology of both humans and aliens. He is occasionally frightened to a state of witlessness -- an understandable and realistic reaction that adds credibility to the story. The task of survival on an alien ship is complicated by the divided reactions of all the people on Earth who are listening to the radio transmissions and who criticize the crew for being unnecessarily violent or insufficiently aggressive, for engaging in too much or too little exploration of the ship, and generally for mucking things up.

A shortcoming of the novel is that the crew members jump to conclusions that seem questionable, if not unlikely, given the scant evidence to support them. Nonetheless, their conclusions advance the plot, which moves along briskly. This isn't by any means a great novel -- at times it seems a bit silly -- but it's well written and the plot ultimately works: the conflict between the crew and the bureaucrats back on Earth is just as interesting as the conflict between the humans and aliens on the ship.
Agrainel
All Judgment Fled (the title is taken from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar) is an entertaining first contact novel. An object following an unnatural path is detected in the vicinity of Mars. Two American ships, each with a crew of three, are sent to investigate. They find an alien ship. It doesn't respond to signals, doesn't seem to be doing anything; its purpose is a mystery. Behaving rather foolishly, some crew members enter the ship and, having damaged their space suits in an encounter with violent but seemingly unintelligent aliens, find themselves stranded inside the ship. Oops!

The story is a study in the psychology of first contact. Three different alien species inhabit the ship. The humans must decide which species are intelligent, which are friendly, and why they're here. The six crew members (four astronauts, two in training) are selected more for their ability to survive the trip than for their expertise. The story's primary focus is on McCullough, whose medical background makes him the unofficial expert in the psychology of both humans and aliens. He is occasionally frightened to a state of witlessness -- an understandable and realistic reaction that adds credibility to the story. The task of survival on an alien ship is complicated by the divided reactions of all the people on Earth who are listening to the radio transmissions and who criticize the crew for being unnecessarily violent or insufficiently aggressive, for engaging in too much or too little exploration of the ship, and generally for mucking things up.

A shortcoming of the novel is that the crew members jump to conclusions that seem questionable, if not unlikely, given the scant evidence to support them. Nonetheless, their conclusions advance the plot, which moves along briskly. This isn't by any means a great novel -- at times it seems a bit silly -- but it's well written and the plot ultimately works: the conflict between the crew and the bureaucrats back on Earth is just as interesting as the conflict between the humans and aliens on the ship.
heart of sky
Interesting book. As for what happened after, I am surprised that the author didn't bother to explain more about that.
heart of sky
Interesting book. As for what happened after, I am surprised that the author didn't bother to explain more about that.
Hulis
James White’s All Judgement Fled (1967) is easily the most inventive 60s/70s “Big Dumb Object” novels I have encountered. Far more complex than Clarke’s straight-laced so-called masterpiece Rendezvous with Rama (1973) or the fascinating veneer (and nothing more) of Larry Niven’s bland Ringworld (1970). Notice that White’s novel predates both better known behemoths of this common subgenre.

Years ago I read and enjoyed James White’s The Watch Below (1966) but for whatever reason I did not read more of his novels. All Judgement Fled (1968) is even better. Unlike White’s most famous medical-themed SF, this novel psychologically dark and unsettling which often hints at themes that Malzberg would tackle a few years later (such as perpetuating the cult of the astronaut even in the face of incredible danger)…

“It was Walters who had the last word. Deafeningly, apologetically, with the volume of his transmitter turned right up he said, ‘It was set to rebroadcast your last words as the Ship carried you out of the solar system to some dire, extraterrestrial fate. This spirited exchange of ideas is being overheard by all the world.

‘I don’t think the general will approve of some of the language…'” (140)

The first third of the novel is claustrophobic and terrifying—the astronauts journey towards the strange Big Dumb Object in two tiny space capsules. One crewman is wrecked by some psychosomatic illness triggered by his psychological state…. And, all hell breaks loose as all semblance of a potential peaceful first contact breaks down. Wild theories proliferate, violence abounds, who is experimenting on who?
Hulis
James White’s All Judgement Fled (1967) is easily the most inventive 60s/70s “Big Dumb Object” novels I have encountered. Far more complex than Clarke’s straight-laced so-called masterpiece Rendezvous with Rama (1973) or the fascinating veneer (and nothing more) of Larry Niven’s bland Ringworld (1970). Notice that White’s novel predates both better known behemoths of this common subgenre.

Years ago I read and enjoyed James White’s The Watch Below (1966) but for whatever reason I did not read more of his novels. All Judgement Fled (1968) is even better. Unlike White’s most famous medical-themed SF, this novel psychologically dark and unsettling which often hints at themes that Malzberg would tackle a few years later (such as perpetuating the cult of the astronaut even in the face of incredible danger)…

“It was Walters who had the last word. Deafeningly, apologetically, with the volume of his transmitter turned right up he said, ‘It was set to rebroadcast your last words as the Ship carried you out of the solar system to some dire, extraterrestrial fate. This spirited exchange of ideas is being overheard by all the world.

‘I don’t think the general will approve of some of the language…'” (140)

The first third of the novel is claustrophobic and terrifying—the astronauts journey towards the strange Big Dumb Object in two tiny space capsules. One crewman is wrecked by some psychosomatic illness triggered by his psychological state…. And, all hell breaks loose as all semblance of a potential peaceful first contact breaks down. Wild theories proliferate, violence abounds, who is experimenting on who?
Usanner
Considering James White's general writing niche of xeno-medical science fiction, it's something new when you find a doctor in his novel who isn't a medical doctor. The cast All Judgment Fled contains a doctor of psychology and certainly the novel itself is loaded with a lot of armchair psychology- both of the individual and of the whole.

When the object, sixty million miles from earth and beyond the orbit of Mars, is spotted, a team of astronauts rather than scientists is sent on two cramp-quartered ships on a five month journey. Once there, their psychosis has already presented itself in the form of depression and uncertainty. Their following actions on the alien ship rattles the nerves of the viewers back on Earth and the resulting backlash from central control stresses the crew.

The killing of an alien onboard the alien ship may not have been the brightest idea of the crew but they were simply defending themselves while knowingly trespassing. Their logical deductions throughout the book are seamless, their answers to all the problems are unproblematic and the means they take for the end are self-assuredly justified. Further voyages into the craft are met with more bloodthirsty aliens which only confirms the crew's thoughts on the matter.

The novel is a largely narrative dictation of sequential events aboard the human ships and the alien ship. Nearly every chapter reviews the state of mind the crew are in and the opposing state the citizens of earth are in. Psychology plays a large part in the crews' actions and the words which are directed to the crew by central command. It's a bit maddening reading the words spoken from earth but I was in the same shoes and felt the struggle the crew were under when the unsympathetic command left them dangling out there in space. That kind of cast connection isn't found very often in 60s sci-fi nor is the unveiling of deeper plot details towards the end. The structure used is unique and contrasts well with the bland narrative fight scenes.

It's a must-read for any James White fan and maybe a peripheral interest to the sci-fi enthusiast. Otherwise, you may just be bored with the style and psycho-matters.
Usanner
Considering James White's general writing niche of xeno-medical science fiction, it's something new when you find a doctor in his novel who isn't a medical doctor. The cast All Judgment Fled contains a doctor of psychology and certainly the novel itself is loaded with a lot of armchair psychology- both of the individual and of the whole.

When the object, sixty million miles from earth and beyond the orbit of Mars, is spotted, a team of astronauts rather than scientists is sent on two cramp-quartered ships on a five month journey. Once there, their psychosis has already presented itself in the form of depression and uncertainty. Their following actions on the alien ship rattles the nerves of the viewers back on Earth and the resulting backlash from central control stresses the crew.

The killing of an alien onboard the alien ship may not have been the brightest idea of the crew but they were simply defending themselves while knowingly trespassing. Their logical deductions throughout the book are seamless, their answers to all the problems are unproblematic and the means they take for the end are self-assuredly justified. Further voyages into the craft are met with more bloodthirsty aliens which only confirms the crew's thoughts on the matter.

The novel is a largely narrative dictation of sequential events aboard the human ships and the alien ship. Nearly every chapter reviews the state of mind the crew are in and the opposing state the citizens of earth are in. Psychology plays a large part in the crews' actions and the words which are directed to the crew by central command. It's a bit maddening reading the words spoken from earth but I was in the same shoes and felt the struggle the crew were under when the unsympathetic command left them dangling out there in space. That kind of cast connection isn't found very often in 60s sci-fi nor is the unveiling of deeper plot details towards the end. The structure used is unique and contrasts well with the bland narrative fight scenes.

It's a must-read for any James White fan and maybe a peripheral interest to the sci-fi enthusiast. Otherwise, you may just be bored with the style and psycho-matters.