» » Null-ABC

Null-ABC epub download

by Henry Beam Piper,John Joseph McGuire


By h. beam piper and john j. mcguire. Take it one step further: What happens if "book-learnin'" is held responsible. Illustrated by van Dongen.

By h. There's some reaction these days that holds scientists responsible for war.

Henry Beam Piper (1904 - 1964) was an American science fiction author. This novella, one of four collaborations between H. McGuire, was originally published in the pulp magazine Astounding Science Fiction, split between the February and March 1953 issues. He wrote many short stories and several novels. He is best known for his extensive Terro-Human Future History series of stories and a shorter series of "Paratime" alternate history tales. Null-ABC takes place in the 22nd century, after the Fourth World War. In this dystopian vision of America, has reached its peak. An ideological schism exists between the Literates and the Illiterates.

Henry Beam Piper (March 23, 1904 – c. November 6, 1964) was an American science fiction author. Henry Beam Piper (March 23, 1904 – c.

Books related to Null-Abc. H. Murder in the Gunroom. Crossroads Of Destiny.

Author: Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire. By h. Illustrator: van Dongen. Release Date: May 8, 2006. Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63. 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72.

Project Gutenberg's Null-ABC, by Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire Author: Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire.

Project Gutenberg's Null-ABC, by Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at ww. utenberg. Author: Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire.

the politics, and particularly the enforcement of the laws, in this state, are unbelievably corrupt, but I wonder-".

the politics, and particularly the enforcement of the laws, in this state, are unbelievably corrupt, but I wonder-". Just a moment; I see a flash bulletin being brought i. The novice Literate came to his side and gave him a slip of paper, at which he glanced. Then he laughed heartily. It seems that shortly after I began speaking, the local blue-ribbon grand jury issued a summons for Chief Delaney to appear before them, with all his records. He wrote many short stories and several novels

Henry Beam Piper (March 23, 1904 – c. He wrote under the name H. Beam Piper. Another source gives his name as "Horace Beam Piper" and a different date of death. His gravestone says "Henry Beam Piper"

He Walked Around the Horses.

He Walked Around the Horses. Oomphel in the Sky. 0Readers.

By (author) Henry Beam Piper, By (author) John Joseph McGuire. Free delivery worldwide.

The book has no illustrations or index. Purchasers are entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Subjects: Fiction / Science Fiction / General; Fiction / Classics; Fiction / Science Fiction / General; Fiction / Science Fiction / Adventure; Fiction / Science Fiction / Space Opera; History / Military / Nuclear Warfare; Language Arts

Null-ABC epub download

ISBN13: 978-1406866537

ISBN: 1406866539

Author: Henry Beam Piper,John Joseph McGuire

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Echo Library (April 21, 2008)

Pages: 72 pages

ePUB size: 1356 kb

FB2 size: 1312 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 133

Other Formats: lit azw lrf lit

Related to Null-ABC ePub books

Kifer
As with most of Piper's stories this one is full of commentary on the mores and transgressions of society. In this case the focus is on literacy. Not literacy in the context of being able to read and write, but literacy in the abstract, as a social construct and component element of the social structure. In a World where only a small percentage of the population is literate, and the illiterates are a bigoted majority looking with fear, loathing, and a certain sense of jealous envy upon the literate members of society, there is both prestige and peril in being literate. It's a world where literacy is viewed as a necessary evil. A world where even the rich and powerful are illiterate and have to rely grudgingly on the services of the literate to run their businesses. One is tempted to think of the Middle Ages when Kings and Princes could neither read nor write and depended upon court scribes or a caste of priests to write their treaties and documents for them. The story also includes a rather frank and brutish view of politics as a combination of cunning, guile, and criminality, cynically playing on the fears and prejudices of the illiterate populace to win elections and stay in control. Piper writes a fairly simple tale, yet, as with most of his stories, there is more to the substance of the circumstances laid out in the tale itself than what appears in the plot. Long after the plot wraps up you find yourself still thinking about the questions raised while you were reading it.

Having read many of Pipers works I am somewhat baffled about the man himself. His works are excellent examples of allegory, occasionally drifting into outright satire, but never dull. In the midst of all of his harping about the failures of politics and society, particularly democracies, he usually tells a rather good story. Such is the case with Null-ABC, the story is good, the questions linger on. Piper tells his tale at a pace while skewering society, as he sees it, as he goes along. In Piper's vision, mankind is always on the brink of barbarism, one step away from the precipice, and Piper is always ready to push him over that edge. Piper seems to value honesty and integrity as only marginal virtues; strength of character, as defined by dedication to purpose, and the willingness to sacrifice anything to attain, or maintain, power, seems to be the real virtue he esteems. His stories are certainly not peopled with characters filled with altruistic yearnings or those striving for a higher purpose. The more of his works I read, the more convinced I become that he was a deeply troubled, cynical man, he did commit suicide. He seems to share with Ayn Rand that inability to recognize that good exists within humanity; that there exists within us any inherent moral compass; that only greed, fear, or favor, really drives us; that we cannot actually govern ourselves. Piper's overall tone tends to be that everyone is out for themselves and devil take the hindmost. In any case, he was certainly a talented writer and his stories not only entertain us, they force us to think. Perhaps that is the essential element of his work. that you have to take him seriously in order to enjoy his writing.

For free on Kindle.
Kifer
As with most of Piper's stories this one is full of commentary on the mores and transgressions of society. In this case the focus is on literacy. Not literacy in the context of being able to read and write, but literacy in the abstract, as a social construct and component element of the social structure. In a World where only a small percentage of the population is literate, and the illiterates are a bigoted majority looking with fear, loathing, and a certain sense of jealous envy upon the literate members of society, there is both prestige and peril in being literate. It's a world where literacy is viewed as a necessary evil. A world where even the rich and powerful are illiterate and have to rely grudgingly on the services of the literate to run their businesses. One is tempted to think of the Middle Ages when Kings and Princes could neither read nor write and depended upon court scribes or a caste of priests to write their treaties and documents for them. The story also includes a rather frank and brutish view of politics as a combination of cunning, guile, and criminality, cynically playing on the fears and prejudices of the illiterate populace to win elections and stay in control. Piper writes a fairly simple tale, yet, as with most of his stories, there is more to the substance of the circumstances laid out in the tale itself than what appears in the plot. Long after the plot wraps up you find yourself still thinking about the questions raised while you were reading it.

Having read many of Pipers works I am somewhat baffled about the man himself. His works are excellent examples of allegory, occasionally drifting into outright satire, but never dull. In the midst of all of his harping about the failures of politics and society, particularly democracies, he usually tells a rather good story. Such is the case with Null-ABC, the story is good, the questions linger on. Piper tells his tale at a pace while skewering society, as he sees it, as he goes along. In Piper's vision, mankind is always on the brink of barbarism, one step away from the precipice, and Piper is always ready to push him over that edge. Piper seems to value honesty and integrity as only marginal virtues; strength of character, as defined by dedication to purpose, and the willingness to sacrifice anything to attain, or maintain, power, seems to be the real virtue he esteems. His stories are certainly not peopled with characters filled with altruistic yearnings or those striving for a higher purpose. The more of his works I read, the more convinced I become that he was a deeply troubled, cynical man, he did commit suicide. He seems to share with Ayn Rand that inability to recognize that good exists within humanity; that there exists within us any inherent moral compass; that only greed, fear, or favor, really drives us; that we cannot actually govern ourselves. Piper's overall tone tends to be that everyone is out for themselves and devil take the hindmost. In any case, he was certainly a talented writer and his stories not only entertain us, they force us to think. Perhaps that is the essential element of his work. that you have to take him seriously in order to enjoy his writing.

For free on Kindle.
Abuseyourdna
This novella, one of four collaborations between H. Beam Piper and John J. McGuire, was originally published in the pulp magazine Astounding Science Fiction, split between the February and March 1953 issues. Null-ABC takes place in the 22nd century, after the Fourth World War. In this dystopian vision of America, anti-intellectualism has reached its peak. An ideological schism exists between the Literates and the Illiterates. The majority of the population is illiterate, and literacy is publicly disdained. The Illiterates hold all the political power in the country, yet they still need the Literates to perform certain jobs for them. The Literates are organized into fraternities, sort of like labor unions or guilds, and are identified by their white uniforms. They work as public servants or hired brains, collecting fat paychecks from Illiterate employers. For example, the principal of the public school is a Literate, tasked with the job of educating his students illiterately through audio-visual methods.

Though the synopsis above may give the impression of a serious or heavy book like Fahrenheit 451, for the most part Null-ABC is handled in a very tongue-in-cheek manner. Senator Chester Pelton, an illiterate department store owner, is running for reelection under the Radical-Socialist Party, on the platform of “Put the Literates in their place! Our servants, not our masters!” His opponent from the Independent-Conservative party will do anything to defeat him, including resorting to deception and violence. In this future era, each party employs an army of stormtroopers. Even the department stores are built like fortresses, protected by their contingent of armed soldiers. Each party has spies in the other’s camp, and each has their own factional conflicts to deal with. Piper and McGuire introduce so many characters, it’s hard to tell them all apart or keep track of who is fighting for which side or what agenda. Frankly, after a while I just stopped caring.

This is the second joint effort I’ve read by Piper and McGuire, the other being Lone Star Planet. Both books are political satires, but each primarily uses their political ideas as a set up for ballistic mayhem. I’m not sure what exactly inspired the collaboration between Piper and McGuire, but I’m guessing they were both gun nuts. As the story goes on, the ideological struggle between Literates and Illiterates fades into the background, in favor of Die Hard in a department store. Nevertheless, like any Piper book, this one does have its merits. It’s amazing how the anti-intellectualism depicted in the story presages the revolt against book learnin’ that we saw in the two George W. Bush campaigns. It’s interesting, however, that here it’s the leftist party that most strongly opposes literacy. Another subject on which the book is remarkably prescient is that of weapons in our public schools. Back in the ‘50s Piper and McGuire probably thought they were being cheekily over-the-top with their comments about classroom massacres. Unfortunately recent headlines have proven them not so farfetched.

The idea of a society divided by literacy is a provocative one, but this shoot-’em-up story just doesn’t do it justice. After a few thoughtful notions and a couple of halfhearted chuckles, it devolves into a rather confusing mess. It’s not terrible by pulp fiction standards, but definitely not Piper’s best. In general, his solo work is far superior.
Abuseyourdna
This novella, one of four collaborations between H. Beam Piper and John J. McGuire, was originally published in the pulp magazine Astounding Science Fiction, split between the February and March 1953 issues. Null-ABC takes place in the 22nd century, after the Fourth World War. In this dystopian vision of America, anti-intellectualism has reached its peak. An ideological schism exists between the Literates and the Illiterates. The majority of the population is illiterate, and literacy is publicly disdained. The Illiterates hold all the political power in the country, yet they still need the Literates to perform certain jobs for them. The Literates are organized into fraternities, sort of like labor unions or guilds, and are identified by their white uniforms. They work as public servants or hired brains, collecting fat paychecks from Illiterate employers. For example, the principal of the public school is a Literate, tasked with the job of educating his students illiterately through audio-visual methods.

Though the synopsis above may give the impression of a serious or heavy book like Fahrenheit 451, for the most part Null-ABC is handled in a very tongue-in-cheek manner. Senator Chester Pelton, an illiterate department store owner, is running for reelection under the Radical-Socialist Party, on the platform of “Put the Literates in their place! Our servants, not our masters!” His opponent from the Independent-Conservative party will do anything to defeat him, including resorting to deception and violence. In this future era, each party employs an army of stormtroopers. Even the department stores are built like fortresses, protected by their contingent of armed soldiers. Each party has spies in the other’s camp, and each has their own factional conflicts to deal with. Piper and McGuire introduce so many characters, it’s hard to tell them all apart or keep track of who is fighting for which side or what agenda. Frankly, after a while I just stopped caring.

This is the second joint effort I’ve read by Piper and McGuire, the other being Lone Star Planet. Both books are political satires, but each primarily uses their political ideas as a set up for ballistic mayhem. I’m not sure what exactly inspired the collaboration between Piper and McGuire, but I’m guessing they were both gun nuts. As the story goes on, the ideological struggle between Literates and Illiterates fades into the background, in favor of Die Hard in a department store. Nevertheless, like any Piper book, this one does have its merits. It’s amazing how the anti-intellectualism depicted in the story presages the revolt against book learnin’ that we saw in the two George W. Bush campaigns. It’s interesting, however, that here it’s the leftist party that most strongly opposes literacy. Another subject on which the book is remarkably prescient is that of weapons in our public schools. Back in the ‘50s Piper and McGuire probably thought they were being cheekily over-the-top with their comments about classroom massacres. Unfortunately recent headlines have proven them not so farfetched.

The idea of a society divided by literacy is a provocative one, but this shoot-’em-up story just doesn’t do it justice. After a few thoughtful notions and a couple of halfhearted chuckles, it devolves into a rather confusing mess. It’s not terrible by pulp fiction standards, but definitely not Piper’s best. In general, his solo work is far superior.
Small Black
Constructive social criticism, humorous satire or alternate history ? at any rate this is a story where illiteracy is for most generational and a badge of pride. The literate' are in a pitched political battle to have there usurped moderate candidate elected to the Senate. The political infighting is fierce as it includes gangs, guns and bombs along with the usually back biting, misinformation and idiocy of a national election! It's well written and interesting as well as definitely from a different time. Oh yes there is of course the boy meets girl intrigue as well enjoy.
Small Black
Constructive social criticism, humorous satire or alternate history ? at any rate this is a story where illiteracy is for most generational and a badge of pride. The literate' are in a pitched political battle to have there usurped moderate candidate elected to the Senate. The political infighting is fierce as it includes gangs, guns and bombs along with the usually back biting, misinformation and idiocy of a national election! It's well written and interesting as well as definitely from a different time. Oh yes there is of course the boy meets girl intrigue as well enjoy.
Kigul
The is the same book as Crisis in 2140, Copywritten in 1952 as part of an Ace double with Gunner Cade by Cyril Judd. It is badly dated though a quick read and interesting for Piper fans.
Kigul
The is the same book as Crisis in 2140, Copywritten in 1952 as part of an Ace double with Gunner Cade by Cyril Judd. It is badly dated though a quick read and interesting for Piper fans.