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Green Arrow: Quiver epub download

by Phil Hester,Ande Parks,Kevin Smith


Phil Hester and Ande Park's vivid and energetic art graces these pages.

Phil Hester and Ande Park's vivid and energetic art graces these pages. Hester has impressed me to the point where I consider him third only to Neal Adams and Mike Grell as the definitive Green Arrow artists (but are you really considered definitive if you're third in line? Whatever, Phil Hester rocks!). Green Arrow's always worked in the shadow of Batman. We all know his Arrow-Plane, Arrow-Car, and Arrow-Cave are ideas borrowed from Bats. But I've always liked him, anyway, maybe because I like Robin Hood.

Green Arrow, Vol. 1: Quiver. by Kevin Smith · Phil Hester · Ande Parks

Green Arrow, Vol. by Kevin Smith · Phil Hester · Ande Parks. El activo e intenso creador Kevin Smith, guionista y director de películas independientes tan aclamadas como Clerks, Persiguiendo a Amy, Dogma o Jay y Bob el Silencioso contraatacan, nos cuenta una historia maravillosa que resucita al personaje clásico. The Exterminators, Vol. 2: Insurgency. by Simon Oliver · Tony Moore · Ande Parks · Chris Samnee.

Cannot get over how great Green Arrow looks It is also the end of Kevin's run on this title

Cannot get over how great Green Arrow looks. And Kevin Smith, before he jetted, did some serious inroads in re-establishing Green Arrow as a relevant character in the DC universe. This collection also has the added candy of Phil Hester's 3 paged introduction, as well as reprints of the original covers and an artist gallery, including Hester and Ande's tiny rendition of Kevin Smith as the Emerald Archer. It is also the end of Kevin's run on this title. Although the excellent art team of Phil Hester and Ande Parks are still sticking around with the next writer Brad Meltzer (check out Volume 3 : The Archer's Quest). 15 people found this helpful. 1 book. Stunningly rendered by the top talents of Phil Hester and Ande Parks, Green Arrow: Quiver follows Oliver Queen through man's most uncharted realms - life, death, and back to life again. This deluxe Writer/director Kevin Smith (Clerks, Chasing Amy, Dogma) delivers an awe-inspiring tale which resurrects DC Comics' original Emerald Archer - the legendary Green Arrow!

Quiver was the name of a ten-part storyline that ran through the first year's run of Green Arrow (Volume 3), from April of 2001 until January of 2002.

Quiver was the name of a ten-part storyline that ran through the first year's run of Green Arrow (Volume 3), from April of 2001 until January of 2002. Written by Kevin Smith, with artwork by Phil Hester and Ande Parks, the story centered around the convoluted resurrection of Oliver Queen – the original Green Arrow. There were two previously published comic events that segued into the Quiver storyline. The first was the death of Oliver Queen.

Green Arrow: Quiver - Green Arrow (Paperback). White-hot comics creator and film director, Kevin Smith, revives (literally!) the classic hothead comics character, Oliver Queen, aka Green Arrow. Kevin Smith (author), Phil Hester (author), Ande Parks (illustrator). And Ollie's back in Star City doing what he does best: challenging corporate fatcats, bringing down corrupt politicians and battling drug dealers. But what is the true story behind his mysterious resurrection?

Green Arrow Kevin Smith Phil Hester 2001 NM DC Comic Archer. Green Arrow (2001) Kevin Smith Signed By Phil Hester And Ande Parks.

Phil Hester Original Sketch Green Arrow. Green Arrow Kevin Smith Phil Hester 2001 NM DC Comic Archer. Customs services and international tracking provided. Green Arrow (2001) 17 Signed Phil Hester Autographed DC Meltzer Solomon Grundy.

the Green Arrow, comes back to life, unaware that he was dead, and encounters superheroes including Hal Jordan, Aquaman, and Batman as he struggles to adjust to a world vastly different from the one he left. Format Book 225 pages. Dimensions 16. 4 x 254 x 1. 8mm 56. 9g. Publication date 18 Apr 2008.

Stunningly rendered by the top talents of Phil Hester and Ande Parks, Green Arrow: Quiver follows Oliver Queen through man's most uncharted realms - life, death, and back to life again.

Green Arrow: Quiver epub download

ISBN13: 978-1840235098

ISBN: 1840235098

Author: Phil Hester,Ande Parks,Kevin Smith

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Science Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Titan Books Ltd; New Ed edition (June 27, 2003)

Pages: 232 pages

ePUB size: 1673 kb

FB2 size: 1834 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 729

Other Formats: lit rtf lrf mobi

Related to Green Arrow: Quiver ePub books

Datrim
Its the best reintroduction of a character ever. Kevin Smith brought Daredevil back into the forefront where he should be back in the late 90s at Marvel. Then he did the same thing in the early 00s with Green Arrow. This collection of Kevin Smith's run on Green Arrow is why this character is one of my top 3 favorites in the DCU. Another reason to purchase this collection is that the original TPBs were printed on the older newspaper type paper but this collection is printed on the glossier paper like most comics currently are which is awesome.
Datrim
Its the best reintroduction of a character ever. Kevin Smith brought Daredevil back into the forefront where he should be back in the late 90s at Marvel. Then he did the same thing in the early 00s with Green Arrow. This collection of Kevin Smith's run on Green Arrow is why this character is one of my top 3 favorites in the DCU. Another reason to purchase this collection is that the original TPBs were printed on the older newspaper type paper but this collection is printed on the glossier paper like most comics currently are which is awesome.
Qag
Kevin Smith gets Oliver Queen, no doubt about it. The story is a great exploration as to what makes Ollie...Ollie. The selfishness and the selflessness. The struggle to be his own man and still emulating Batman. Oliver Queen is very much a study in duality in comics if there ever was one. People make the argument that Batman is the true identity while Bruce Wayne is the mask and Superman is the mask to Clark Kent's true identity. Oliver Queen is Green Arrow and Green Arrow is Oliver Queen. There is no mask with him really, no false front. He is probably comics best example of duality and exploring both sides equally. And Kevin Smith gets that.

A few things that I didn't love. If Smith was using Stephanie Brown as Batman's counterpoint to Ollie and Mia's relationship, it could have been explored better then just the one scene with her in it. At this point, I'm also over Smith using religious iconography and symbolism in his works. I know at this point in his comics carrer, he hadn't done it much so I'm making a complaint based through a different lens, but still, it bothered me.

However, since he was committed to the Satanist character, I thought he did a great job in incorporating Jason Blood and Etrigran into the story in a way that made sense. I also laughed quite often during the back story of that character and the different motivations of the husband and wife in joining the cult as it was a bit of gender role reversal.
Qag
Kevin Smith gets Oliver Queen, no doubt about it. The story is a great exploration as to what makes Ollie...Ollie. The selfishness and the selflessness. The struggle to be his own man and still emulating Batman. Oliver Queen is very much a study in duality in comics if there ever was one. People make the argument that Batman is the true identity while Bruce Wayne is the mask and Superman is the mask to Clark Kent's true identity. Oliver Queen is Green Arrow and Green Arrow is Oliver Queen. There is no mask with him really, no false front. He is probably comics best example of duality and exploring both sides equally. And Kevin Smith gets that.

A few things that I didn't love. If Smith was using Stephanie Brown as Batman's counterpoint to Ollie and Mia's relationship, it could have been explored better then just the one scene with her in it. At this point, I'm also over Smith using religious iconography and symbolism in his works. I know at this point in his comics carrer, he hadn't done it much so I'm making a complaint based through a different lens, but still, it bothered me.

However, since he was committed to the Satanist character, I thought he did a great job in incorporating Jason Blood and Etrigran into the story in a way that made sense. I also laughed quite often during the back story of that character and the different motivations of the husband and wife in joining the cult as it was a bit of gender role reversal.
Jeronashe
Like a great many folks, I knew who Green Arrow was, but I just always casually dismissed him. He's a guy with a bow, pfft! But the thing about the character is that he's ALWAYS known he was a regular guy with a bow and a possibly unhealthy Robin Hood worship. LOL He never hid it, and even owned up to it. And Kevin Smith's mantra is just being uniquely you, in whatever way that may be, flaws and all. That makes him IDEAL to write the character of Green Arrow. I came to the book for the very fact that I'm a fan of Kevin Smith, the director. But from about halfway through the first Green Arrow story, I was a fan of the character too. Kevin Smith delivers nothing short of masterwork storytelling. And with that story telling, he did what few thought was possible... He made Green Arrow into a top selling book. How much of a best seller? Try millions. And it was all done with hilarious and moving dialogue, characters that were 'leap off the page' real, and one of the best cast of characters in comics. (Including one of my favorites, Black Canary.) Suffice to say I've been reading Green Arrow ever since. The second part of Kevin Smith's story wraps up in The Sounds of Violence (Green Arrow: Sounds of Violence (Book 2)), and it's every bit as good. So if you're a fan of Green Arrow, or Kevin Smith, or both, then do yourself a favor and pick up these two volumes. I don't think you'll be disappointed.
Thanks for your time folks.
Sincerely, R.A. McDowell
Jeronashe
Like a great many folks, I knew who Green Arrow was, but I just always casually dismissed him. He's a guy with a bow, pfft! But the thing about the character is that he's ALWAYS known he was a regular guy with a bow and a possibly unhealthy Robin Hood worship. LOL He never hid it, and even owned up to it. And Kevin Smith's mantra is just being uniquely you, in whatever way that may be, flaws and all. That makes him IDEAL to write the character of Green Arrow. I came to the book for the very fact that I'm a fan of Kevin Smith, the director. But from about halfway through the first Green Arrow story, I was a fan of the character too. Kevin Smith delivers nothing short of masterwork storytelling. And with that story telling, he did what few thought was possible... He made Green Arrow into a top selling book. How much of a best seller? Try millions. And it was all done with hilarious and moving dialogue, characters that were 'leap off the page' real, and one of the best cast of characters in comics. (Including one of my favorites, Black Canary.) Suffice to say I've been reading Green Arrow ever since. The second part of Kevin Smith's story wraps up in The Sounds of Violence (Green Arrow: Sounds of Violence (Book 2)), and it's every bit as good. So if you're a fan of Green Arrow, or Kevin Smith, or both, then do yourself a favor and pick up these two volumes. I don't think you'll be disappointed.
Thanks for your time folks.
Sincerely, R.A. McDowell
Jonariara
Ollie: "We're close - me and Green Arrow."
Teenager Mia Dearden: "What am I, stupid or something? You ARE the Green Arrow!"
Ollie: "How did...? When did...? Who told you?"
Mia: "Oh, please! I'm not a total idiot! That little mask you wear doesn't exactly Batman your face. And the beard's a dead giveaway, too."
Ollie: "You wanna blow my secret identity?! Keep your voice down."

Green Arrow's back! In 2001 DC's resident hotheaded superhero activist Oliver Queen returned from the dead to once again star in his own monthly series. Indie film writer/director Kevin Smith does comic book fans a solid by taking a crack at chronicling Green Arrow's exploits. Smith would once again prove his storytelling gifts as this awesome hire would consistently place the Emerald Archer's title firmly on the topselling lists in the comic book realm. So, yes, Green Arrow, better than ever.

GREEN ARROW: QUIVER presents the collected first 10 issues of this new regular monthly. As the series opens, the intimates of Oliver Queen reflect on him and his untimely passing. I don't think it's much of a giveaway when I mention that the last page of the first issue has Green Arrow back from the dead. Homeless, unkempt and in tatters, yeah, but back from the dead. The wealthy old man Green Arrow rescues from being murdered in a scummy alley becomes a staunch friend who takes in the amnesiac Oliver and who then finances his return to costumed vigilantism in Star City. Corrupt fat cats, watch out!

One thing, though: Ollie's been stricken with amnesia, to the point where he doesn't recall events past when he and his pal Hal Jordan (Green Lantern) were trekking across America (as told in those classic, socially relevant issues by Dennis O'Neil and Neal Adams, remember?). So here we have a more innocent, less jaded, but still very much opinionated Green Arrow. Except, in his eyes, he hasn't killed anyone or cheated on his pretty bird. Or perished in a bomb explosion.

Plenty of guest stars in these issues as Ollie's old acquaintances learn of his resurrection. These definitely include folks in his inner circle: Roy, Connor, Dinah, and Hal. The Justice Leaguers try to welcome him back, but changes in the ranks have Ollie disconcerted and disgruntled. Too, his abrupt reappearance draws the suspicions of Batman, who sniffs around for a few issues to see what's up with that. Then several of DC's mystical denizens pop in, including the demon Etrigan, who seems intent on reestablishing Ollie's non-living status. By the way, Kevin Smith teases the readers by holding out on explanations on Ollie's return, which aren't provided until around the 7th issue. But until full disclosure he keeps us entertained with good storytelling.

There are several satisfying "relationship" moments here, from Ollie's re-introduction to his Arrow family to his interactions with colleagues Batman and Aquaman and with his best friend Hal Jordan, who'd just taken up the Spectre's mantle. And, of course, there's his reunion with the pretty bird. Smith also introduces a promising new supporting cast member in troubled teen Mia Dearden, whom Ollie takes under his wing. If you've been brushing up on Green Arrow lore, you know what's in store for Mia.

Oliver Queen will always question authority. In reintegrating Ollie into the DC universe, Kevin Smith keeps intact Green Arrow's iconic characteristics, keeps him headstrong and liberal. It's not too long before the Emerald Archer is again crusading against Star City's governing fat cats and street scum. These stories contain an element of that grit typically associated with the Green Arrow, yet combined with several supernatural sequences. Green Arrow's villains here range from lowly muggers to political crooks to devil worshippers and demons. Somehow Smith makes it all work, and with less use of Ollie's trick arrows. Phil Hester and Ande Park's vivid and energetic art graces these pages. Hester has impressed me to the point where I consider him third only to Neal Adams and Mike Grell as the definitive Green Arrow artists (but are you really considered definitive if you're third in line? Whatever, Phil Hester rocks!).

Green Arrow's always worked in the shadow of Batman. We all know his Arrow-Plane, Arrow-Car, and Arrow-Cave are ideas borrowed from Bats. But I've always liked him, anyway, maybe because I like Robin Hood. Glad to see DC took Green Arrow serious enough that they got someone like Kevin Smith to write him. GREEN ARROW: QUIVER, at 232 pages, is a pleasantly thick read as trade paperbacks go. It also comes with a three-paged intro by Kevin Smith. This volume is for folks who like their heroes to be not too powerful yet be able to bust heads with relish. And for those who also like their heroes to be vocal and argumentative, and maybe with a touch of social conscience, yet old-fashioned and romantic at heart, well, then, this is the right place.
Jonariara
Ollie: "We're close - me and Green Arrow."
Teenager Mia Dearden: "What am I, stupid or something? You ARE the Green Arrow!"
Ollie: "How did...? When did...? Who told you?"
Mia: "Oh, please! I'm not a total idiot! That little mask you wear doesn't exactly Batman your face. And the beard's a dead giveaway, too."
Ollie: "You wanna blow my secret identity?! Keep your voice down."

Green Arrow's back! In 2001 DC's resident hotheaded superhero activist Oliver Queen returned from the dead to once again star in his own monthly series. Indie film writer/director Kevin Smith does comic book fans a solid by taking a crack at chronicling Green Arrow's exploits. Smith would once again prove his storytelling gifts as this awesome hire would consistently place the Emerald Archer's title firmly on the topselling lists in the comic book realm. So, yes, Green Arrow, better than ever.

GREEN ARROW: QUIVER presents the collected first 10 issues of this new regular monthly. As the series opens, the intimates of Oliver Queen reflect on him and his untimely passing. I don't think it's much of a giveaway when I mention that the last page of the first issue has Green Arrow back from the dead. Homeless, unkempt and in tatters, yeah, but back from the dead. The wealthy old man Green Arrow rescues from being murdered in a scummy alley becomes a staunch friend who takes in the amnesiac Oliver and who then finances his return to costumed vigilantism in Star City. Corrupt fat cats, watch out!

One thing, though: Ollie's been stricken with amnesia, to the point where he doesn't recall events past when he and his pal Hal Jordan (Green Lantern) were trekking across America (as told in those classic, socially relevant issues by Dennis O'Neil and Neal Adams, remember?). So here we have a more innocent, less jaded, but still very much opinionated Green Arrow. Except, in his eyes, he hasn't killed anyone or cheated on his pretty bird. Or perished in a bomb explosion.

Plenty of guest stars in these issues as Ollie's old acquaintances learn of his resurrection. These definitely include folks in his inner circle: Roy, Connor, Dinah, and Hal. The Justice Leaguers try to welcome him back, but changes in the ranks have Ollie disconcerted and disgruntled. Too, his abrupt reappearance draws the suspicions of Batman, who sniffs around for a few issues to see what's up with that. Then several of DC's mystical denizens pop in, including the demon Etrigan, who seems intent on reestablishing Ollie's non-living status. By the way, Kevin Smith teases the readers by holding out on explanations on Ollie's return, which aren't provided until around the 7th issue. But until full disclosure he keeps us entertained with good storytelling.

There are several satisfying "relationship" moments here, from Ollie's re-introduction to his Arrow family to his interactions with colleagues Batman and Aquaman and with his best friend Hal Jordan, who'd just taken up the Spectre's mantle. And, of course, there's his reunion with the pretty bird. Smith also introduces a promising new supporting cast member in troubled teen Mia Dearden, whom Ollie takes under his wing. If you've been brushing up on Green Arrow lore, you know what's in store for Mia.

Oliver Queen will always question authority. In reintegrating Ollie into the DC universe, Kevin Smith keeps intact Green Arrow's iconic characteristics, keeps him headstrong and liberal. It's not too long before the Emerald Archer is again crusading against Star City's governing fat cats and street scum. These stories contain an element of that grit typically associated with the Green Arrow, yet combined with several supernatural sequences. Green Arrow's villains here range from lowly muggers to political crooks to devil worshippers and demons. Somehow Smith makes it all work, and with less use of Ollie's trick arrows. Phil Hester and Ande Park's vivid and energetic art graces these pages. Hester has impressed me to the point where I consider him third only to Neal Adams and Mike Grell as the definitive Green Arrow artists (but are you really considered definitive if you're third in line? Whatever, Phil Hester rocks!).

Green Arrow's always worked in the shadow of Batman. We all know his Arrow-Plane, Arrow-Car, and Arrow-Cave are ideas borrowed from Bats. But I've always liked him, anyway, maybe because I like Robin Hood. Glad to see DC took Green Arrow serious enough that they got someone like Kevin Smith to write him. GREEN ARROW: QUIVER, at 232 pages, is a pleasantly thick read as trade paperbacks go. It also comes with a three-paged intro by Kevin Smith. This volume is for folks who like their heroes to be not too powerful yet be able to bust heads with relish. And for those who also like their heroes to be vocal and argumentative, and maybe with a touch of social conscience, yet old-fashioned and romantic at heart, well, then, this is the right place.