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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign epub download

by Paizo Staff,Jason Bulmahn


And if you are playing the Pathfinder Kingmaker campaign, this book includes the revised rules for kingdom management (which you can also find on the Paizo site).

And if you are playing the Pathfinder Kingmaker campaign, this book includes the revised rules for kingdom management (which you can also find on the Paizo site). Players are treated to a buffet of story ideas, some randomization tables for character backstory by class and race, and lots of Traits. Many of the traits are identical to those in the Advanced Players Guide and the Kingmaker campaign (note that some campaign feats, like "Bastard" in Kingmaker, have different properties in this sourcebook).

Book- Ultimate Campaign. Execution-This book is the standard Paizo quality. It's not listed I mean. TL;DR- Tables and Rules Everywhere!-83%. Basics- Ultimate Campaign focuses on the rules around the rest of the Pathfinder RPG. This book is more "meta" then most books. The book starts with a chapter on how to make characters; not how to make stats, but how to build a story into your characters. The book is a nice hard cover with well put together pages.

ew sourceView history

ew sourceView history. Ultimate Campaign, a hardcover core Pathfinder RPG book featuring content by Jesse Benner, Benjamin Bruck, Jason Bulmahn, Ryan Costello, Adam Daigle, Matt Goetz, Tim Hitchcock, James Jacobs, Ryan Macklin, Colin McComb, Jason Nelson, Richard Pett, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Patrick Renie, Sean K Reynolds, F. Wesley Schneider, James L. Sutter, Russ Taylor, and Steven Townshend, was released on May 29, 2013.

Jason Bulmahn, Paizo Staff. Take Charge! Where the dungeon ends, another adventure begins! Pathfinder RPG Ultimate Campaign takes you on a guided tour through the parts of the game that happen between monster attacks and quests for ancient artifacts. As some of the most powerful and prestigious heroes around, do your player characters want to build up a kingdom of their own, or lead an army against a neighboring nation? Perhaps they want to start a business, craft magic items, or embark on a quest that will come to define them.

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game book. Take Charge!Where the dungeon ends, another adventure. Where the dungeon ends, another adventure begins! Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign takes you on a guided tour through the parts of the game that happen between monster attacks and quests for ancient artifacts. As some of the most powerful and prestigious heroes around, do your player characters want to build up a kingdom of their own, or lead an a Take Charge! Where the dungeon ends, another adventure begins!

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign by Jason . Place of Publication. Paizo Publishing, Llc. Leisure & Lifestyle.

Place of Publication.

Roleplaying Game campaign with Bestiary 4! This collection of creatures shatters all past thresholds of . .new Pathfinder Roleplaying Game!Backward-compatible with the . fantasy rules but packed.Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: The Pathfinder Bestiary. 57 MB·552 Downloads·New! new Pathfinder Roleplaying Game!Backward-compatible with the . Life-Sciences GATE-DBT. 5 MB·38,317 Downloads. ISBN: 978-81-906427-7-4 Life Sciences Life-Sciences part-2-CS. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Pathfinder Unchained.

Jun 25, 2019- Read Jason Bulmahn's new book, Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Equipment. Published on 2016-07-19

Jun 25, 2019- Read Jason Bulmahn's new book, Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Equipment. Published on 2016-07-19. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Equipment PDF Jason Bulmahn Paizo Inc. Gear up your Pathfinder RPG character in style with this massive catalog of thousands of magic items, alchemical equipment, weapons, and adventuring gear!

The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) that was published in 2009 by Paizo Publishing.

The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) that was published in 2009 by Paizo Publishing.

Take Charge!Where the dungeon ends, another adventure begins! Pathfinder RPG Ultimate Campaign takes you on a guided tour through the parts of the game that happen between monster attacks and quests for ancient artifacts. As some of the most powerful and prestigious heroes around, do your player characters want to build up a kingdom of their own, or lead an army against a neighboring nation? Perhaps they want to start a business, craft magic items, or embark on a quest that will come to define them. Whether you're looking for help generating a young character or seeking ways to challenge adventurers who've grown bored of fighting monsters one-on-one, this book has everything you need! Pathfinder RPG Ultimate Campaign is a must-have companion volume to the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook. This imaginative tabletop game builds on more than 10 years of system development and an open playtest featuring more than 50,000 gamers to create a cutting-edge RPG experience that brings the all-time best-selling set of fantasy rules into a new era.

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign epub download

ISBN13: 978-1601254986

ISBN: 1601254989

Author: Paizo Staff,Jason Bulmahn

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Gaming

Language: English

Publisher: Paizo Inc.; 1st edition (March 21, 2017)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1490 kb

FB2 size: 1278 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 169

Other Formats: txt doc lit rtf

Related to Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign ePub books

Not-the-Same
This is the first Pathfinder book that disappointed me. I guess everyone has their own way of gaming, but rules for downtime is not really something I have every needed. I was expecting more from the mass combat system, and it was an appendix in the back of the book. I thought that running Wrath of the Righteous I would need it, but really I didn't. It felt like a bunch of odd system bits mashed together into a hard cover book.
Not-the-Same
This is the first Pathfinder book that disappointed me. I guess everyone has their own way of gaming, but rules for downtime is not really something I have every needed. I was expecting more from the mass combat system, and it was an appendix in the back of the book. I thought that running Wrath of the Righteous I would need it, but really I didn't. It felt like a bunch of odd system bits mashed together into a hard cover book.
Vushura
There are 2 aspects I decided to rate this book with: presentation and contents.

Contents.

I am not gonna replicate here what you can find on the web, as far as what each chapter contains. I just bought the book and found the rules presented in the first couple of chapters to be extremely useful. We have been playing with the same party for some time, and using the rules for background generation helped bring some of the characters' backgrounds to the front in creative new ways. The next section, about downtime is fantastic in allowing Players more varied choices on how to achieve certain goals. I found these rules to be extremely creative and very solid for the 3.5/Pathfinder game. These 2 sections we are already using in the game.
The rest of the book provides other nice rules, which I havent had the chance to test with my players, but they seem specially useful for certain types of campaigns and I am sure many GMs (and players) would benefit from the ideas provided there.

Presentation.
This is where I had to substract 2 stars from the product. I am so used to the great quality of Paizo's books, and this one falls short. It seems they used a different kind of paper, so while the book is still full color, the colors seem washed out, like a bit pale. Even to the touch, it feels like it is a cheaper book. Too bad, because the book is fantastic, and I am not sure why they decided to go this way, when all their book, even the small 64 page booklets have had amazing color. The cover is the usual quality, which is good.

I would still recommend the book for its contents, it provides amazing ideas, specially if you combine these with the tules from previous books.
Vushura
There are 2 aspects I decided to rate this book with: presentation and contents.

Contents.

I am not gonna replicate here what you can find on the web, as far as what each chapter contains. I just bought the book and found the rules presented in the first couple of chapters to be extremely useful. We have been playing with the same party for some time, and using the rules for background generation helped bring some of the characters' backgrounds to the front in creative new ways. The next section, about downtime is fantastic in allowing Players more varied choices on how to achieve certain goals. I found these rules to be extremely creative and very solid for the 3.5/Pathfinder game. These 2 sections we are already using in the game.
The rest of the book provides other nice rules, which I havent had the chance to test with my players, but they seem specially useful for certain types of campaigns and I am sure many GMs (and players) would benefit from the ideas provided there.

Presentation.
This is where I had to substract 2 stars from the product. I am so used to the great quality of Paizo's books, and this one falls short. It seems they used a different kind of paper, so while the book is still full color, the colors seem washed out, like a bit pale. Even to the touch, it feels like it is a cheaper book. Too bad, because the book is fantastic, and I am not sure why they decided to go this way, when all their book, even the small 64 page booklets have had amazing color. The cover is the usual quality, which is good.

I would still recommend the book for its contents, it provides amazing ideas, specially if you combine these with the tules from previous books.
Dark_Sun
This sourcebook is clearly intended for players as well as gamemasters, if not more so. Much of the content is generic in format and can be ported to other game systems as well. And if you are playing the Pathfinder Kingmaker campaign, this book includes the revised rules for kingdom management (which you can also find on the Paizo site).

Players are treated to a buffet of story ideas, some randomization tables for character backstory by class and race, and lots of Traits. Many of the traits are identical to those in the Advanced Players Guide and the Kingmaker campaign (note that some campaign feats, like "Bastard" in Kingmaker, have different properties in this sourcebook). Finally, there are story feats, which are pretty complicated and might need GM consideration.

The Downtime section is good. This is clearly player-centric and designed for players to manage a building or two of their own, like a fort or an inn. Very useful floor plans included. The system lets you abstract purchases by components (labor, goods, magic and influence) or just by gold pieces. The prices are incredibly modest compared to 3.5 equivalents; I recall 3.5 had a castle at 500,000gp but Ultimate Campaign gives a little over 7,000. There are also event tables by building type for GMs to use or extract for ideas. Mileage may vary; some of these are pretty cheesy even for fantasy RPG. "A wealthy merchant, noble or other person privately asks for help with a personal problem such as halitosis or bedroom performance problems." Running out of ideas, Paizo?

The chapter on Campaign Systems is a proper salad bar for the gamemaster. There are several clarifications on animal companions, followers, contacts, exploration, magic item creation, and so on, as well as intangible player qualities like alignment, honor, prestige, fame and prestige. Some are full rule sets with a point-based system that might be useful for a character-centered campaign in an urban adventure, but will find little use in a typical adventure. Even if you avoid the mini-rules systems, most of the subsections feature rules clarifications and examples.

The last section, Kingdoms and War, is a rules set for building and managing a full kingdom. It abstracts everything from food and labor to cash money into "build points", which players spend to acquire territory, construct buildings, improve land, and finance operations. It does not dovetail well with the Downtime building rules. The mechanics of this mini-game have the feeling of an obscure Avalon Hill board game. Some of the material appears to have been shoehorned according to its statistical benefits rather than actual value. For instance, a castle spanning four lots costs 54 BP, but a marketplace (an "open space" spanning two lots) costs 48BP. As such, it suffers from the problems of a typical sim game. Success in the early stages requires good stats rather than good planning. But you can't just roll your way through it; you will require multiple record pages. It's not always good to be the king.

Lastly, there are rules for large scale warfare. Much easier to follow than the Kingdoms rules, although I haven't tried it yet.

All told, Ultimate Campaign is a useful sourcebook if you approach it with a critical eye. There's plenty here to be used as it is, some that requires extraction or house-ruling, and large chunks that can be disregarded altogether.
Dark_Sun
This sourcebook is clearly intended for players as well as gamemasters, if not more so. Much of the content is generic in format and can be ported to other game systems as well. And if you are playing the Pathfinder Kingmaker campaign, this book includes the revised rules for kingdom management (which you can also find on the Paizo site).

Players are treated to a buffet of story ideas, some randomization tables for character backstory by class and race, and lots of Traits. Many of the traits are identical to those in the Advanced Players Guide and the Kingmaker campaign (note that some campaign feats, like "Bastard" in Kingmaker, have different properties in this sourcebook). Finally, there are story feats, which are pretty complicated and might need GM consideration.

The Downtime section is good. This is clearly player-centric and designed for players to manage a building or two of their own, like a fort or an inn. Very useful floor plans included. The system lets you abstract purchases by components (labor, goods, magic and influence) or just by gold pieces. The prices are incredibly modest compared to 3.5 equivalents; I recall 3.5 had a castle at 500,000gp but Ultimate Campaign gives a little over 7,000. There are also event tables by building type for GMs to use or extract for ideas. Mileage may vary; some of these are pretty cheesy even for fantasy RPG. "A wealthy merchant, noble or other person privately asks for help with a personal problem such as halitosis or bedroom performance problems." Running out of ideas, Paizo?

The chapter on Campaign Systems is a proper salad bar for the gamemaster. There are several clarifications on animal companions, followers, contacts, exploration, magic item creation, and so on, as well as intangible player qualities like alignment, honor, prestige, fame and prestige. Some are full rule sets with a point-based system that might be useful for a character-centered campaign in an urban adventure, but will find little use in a typical adventure. Even if you avoid the mini-rules systems, most of the subsections feature rules clarifications and examples.

The last section, Kingdoms and War, is a rules set for building and managing a full kingdom. It abstracts everything from food and labor to cash money into "build points", which players spend to acquire territory, construct buildings, improve land, and finance operations. It does not dovetail well with the Downtime building rules. The mechanics of this mini-game have the feeling of an obscure Avalon Hill board game. Some of the material appears to have been shoehorned according to its statistical benefits rather than actual value. For instance, a castle spanning four lots costs 54 BP, but a marketplace (an "open space" spanning two lots) costs 48BP. As such, it suffers from the problems of a typical sim game. Success in the early stages requires good stats rather than good planning. But you can't just roll your way through it; you will require multiple record pages. It's not always good to be the king.

Lastly, there are rules for large scale warfare. Much easier to follow than the Kingdoms rules, although I haven't tried it yet.

All told, Ultimate Campaign is a useful sourcebook if you approach it with a critical eye. There's plenty here to be used as it is, some that requires extraction or house-ruling, and large chunks that can be disregarded altogether.