» » Maskerade

Maskerade epub download

by Tony Robinson,Terry Pratchett


Maskerade is the 5th book in the Witches series, and the 18th book in Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld. Pratchett uses his other world to hold up a distorting mirror to our own. he is a satirist of enormous talent.

Maskerade is the 5th book in the Witches series, and the 18th book in Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld.

Sir Terry Pratchett, OBE, was the author of more than 70 books, including the internationally bestselling Discworld series of. .

Sir Terry Pratchett, OBE, was the author of more than 70 books, including the internationally bestselling Discworld series of novels. His books have been adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal. If you haven't read "Witches Abroad," you may be wondering how a cat can pass as a masked man.

Part of Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. And he dreamed the dream of all those who publish books, which was to have so much gold in your pockets that you would have to employ two people just to hold your trousers up. The huge, be-columned, gargoyle-haunted face of Ankh-Morpork's Opera House was there, in front of Agnes Nitt.

Maskerade is a fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, the eighteenth book in the Discworld series

Maskerade is a fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, the eighteenth book in the Discworld series. The witches Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg visit the Ankh-Morpork Opera House to find Agnes Nitt, a girl from Lancre, and get caught up in a story similar to The Phantom of the Opera. The story begins with Agnes Nitt leaving Lancre to seek a career at the Opera House in Ankh-Morpork

All of Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld books are good but having an adventure with Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Og makes it all the better. Here we find Lancre’s two most famous witches traveling to Ankh-Morpork to find Agnes Nitt who has taken up in the chorus of the Ankh-Morpork Opera house. And of course they happen upon a Scooby-Doolicious murder mystery surrounding the legend of the opera ghost.

Narrated by Tony Robinson. I thought: opera, how hard can it be? Songs. Pretty girls dancing. Lots of people handing over cash.

Text By – Terry Pratchett. Voice – Tony Robinson (13). 4 9. Terry Pratchett. Maskerade ‎(3xCD, Album). Maskerade ‎(8xCass, Album + Box). Other Versions (2 of 2) View All. Cat.

Written by Terry Pratchett, narrated by Tony Robinson. Pratchett has a subject and a style that is very much his ow. ( Sunday Times). Blackadder Goes Forth.

Sir Terence David John Pratchett OBE (28 April 1948 – 12 March 2015) was an English humorist, satirist, and author of fantasy novels, especially comical works. He is best known for his Discworld series of 41 novels. Pratchett's first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971. The first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983, after which Pratchett wrote an average of two books a year.

The Opera House, Ankh-Morpork: a huge rambling building, where innocent young sopranos are lured to their destiny by a strangely familiar evil mastermind in a hideously deformed evening dress. But Granny Weatherwax is in the audience, and she doesn’t hold with that sort of thing. So there’s going to be trouble (but nevertheless a good evening’s entertainment with murders you can really hum.)

Maskerade epub download

ISBN13: 978-0552153249

ISBN: 0552153249

Author: Tony Robinson,Terry Pratchett

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Corgi Audio; Abridged edition (November 22, 2005)

ePUB size: 1358 kb

FB2 size: 1596 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 735

Other Formats: mbr rtf doc mobi

Related to Maskerade ePub books

Adrierdin
It's difficult to choose a favorite Discworld book because there are only fractions of points between their ratings. I think Witches Abroad is still my number one favorite but Maskerade runs a very close second. They're in my top 40 for sure :-). The Joy of Snacks but had me laughing more than any of the other ones and that takes some doing because I love Terry Pratchett's humor more than any other author. Just read everything he wrote - his physical loss is a sad thing for literature but his voluminous contributions will live on till The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch are fulfilled.
Adrierdin
It's difficult to choose a favorite Discworld book because there are only fractions of points between their ratings. I think Witches Abroad is still my number one favorite but Maskerade runs a very close second. They're in my top 40 for sure :-). The Joy of Snacks but had me laughing more than any of the other ones and that takes some doing because I love Terry Pratchett's humor more than any other author. Just read everything he wrote - his physical loss is a sad thing for literature but his voluminous contributions will live on till The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch are fulfilled.
Gio
In which Terry Pratchett takes on the world of opera with typically anarchic and yet thoughtful results. Pratchett's long been fascinated with the power of stories and their presentation (see, for instance, Moving Pictures and Wyrd Sisters), and Maskerade is no different, as the power of opera proves to be surprisingly durable. To be fair, there's a lot more of the musical in here than the opera, especially given that the main plot is Pratchett's fractured version of The Phantom of the Opera; but really, unless you're a diehard purist, does it matter? This is a Witches book, and while they've never been my favorite story arc, there's no denying the fun Pratchett has with these ladies and their effects on the world, and when these effects include mutating cats, observations about how to determine the IQ of a mob (answer: determine the IQ of the lowest member and divide by the number of mobsters), musings by Death as to the inadvisability of the dead intruding on murder investigations, and an appropriately operatic and over-the-top ending, how can you not have fun with this one? It may not be the equal of the series's highest points (Mort,Small Gods,Thud!), but it's still a blast.
Gio
In which Terry Pratchett takes on the world of opera with typically anarchic and yet thoughtful results. Pratchett's long been fascinated with the power of stories and their presentation (see, for instance, Moving Pictures and Wyrd Sisters), and Maskerade is no different, as the power of opera proves to be surprisingly durable. To be fair, there's a lot more of the musical in here than the opera, especially given that the main plot is Pratchett's fractured version of The Phantom of the Opera; but really, unless you're a diehard purist, does it matter? This is a Witches book, and while they've never been my favorite story arc, there's no denying the fun Pratchett has with these ladies and their effects on the world, and when these effects include mutating cats, observations about how to determine the IQ of a mob (answer: determine the IQ of the lowest member and divide by the number of mobsters), musings by Death as to the inadvisability of the dead intruding on murder investigations, and an appropriately operatic and over-the-top ending, how can you not have fun with this one? It may not be the equal of the series's highest points (Mort,Small Gods,Thud!), but it's still a blast.
Vushura
You know what I think? I think Terry Pratchett is breaking the rules. He's not writing these books for his publisher, or even for us - I think he's writing for himself. And I'm so glad he is. Because instead of sticking to some "formula for success," which usually results in most sequels turning out to be pale, thin imitations of the books that made us ask the author for more, Pratchett just keeps on turning out great STORIES and each one gets richer and better as his characters and his world develop and become more real.
But enough of my half-formed Theory of Great Literature. Here is why you want to read Masquerade: It has Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg in it. And, as if that weren't enough to make you want to read it (well, it was enough for me!) Death shows up (of course he's everywhere, right?) in a very interesting cameo, wherein we get to wonder just who - Granny or Death - IS the most powerful character on the Disc. Dear (?) ol' Greebo gets a large speaknig part in this one, too (mee-yowl!)
This is the story of how Agnes/Perdita Nitt came to be involved in in the unconventional coven. It's also a murder mystery (people are dropping out of the flies like flies) and it's a belly-busting look at opera and the entertainment industry and - as always - human nature overall.
It never ceases to amaze me how Pratchett manages to make me say "wow, that is so deep, that is so true," and yet laugh so hard I have to put the book down for a few minutes - every few minutes.
Vushura
You know what I think? I think Terry Pratchett is breaking the rules. He's not writing these books for his publisher, or even for us - I think he's writing for himself. And I'm so glad he is. Because instead of sticking to some "formula for success," which usually results in most sequels turning out to be pale, thin imitations of the books that made us ask the author for more, Pratchett just keeps on turning out great STORIES and each one gets richer and better as his characters and his world develop and become more real.
But enough of my half-formed Theory of Great Literature. Here is why you want to read Masquerade: It has Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg in it. And, as if that weren't enough to make you want to read it (well, it was enough for me!) Death shows up (of course he's everywhere, right?) in a very interesting cameo, wherein we get to wonder just who - Granny or Death - IS the most powerful character on the Disc. Dear (?) ol' Greebo gets a large speaknig part in this one, too (mee-yowl!)
This is the story of how Agnes/Perdita Nitt came to be involved in in the unconventional coven. It's also a murder mystery (people are dropping out of the flies like flies) and it's a belly-busting look at opera and the entertainment industry and - as always - human nature overall.
It never ceases to amaze me how Pratchett manages to make me say "wow, that is so deep, that is so true," and yet laugh so hard I have to put the book down for a few minutes - every few minutes.
Yramede
Admittedly this is not a heavyweight book. But then, I don't read Terry Pratchett's Discworld series to be challenged mentally, I read them because they are fun. And Maskerade is one of Pratchett's best in that area. The book is mainly about poking fun at The Phantom of the Opera, and many other Andrew Lloyd Webber creations, with a simple storyline (although it does appear to be raising a character from a previous book to a more prominent role).
The allusions and parody in Maskerade are (moderately) subtle, so they don't interfere with the flow of the story (what there is of it). In fact, the book won't be anywhere near as enjoyable for someone who isn't familiar with the stage presentation of Phantom.

So if you are looking for an easy and enjoyable read, and have already read earlier books in the "Witches" line of Discworld, go for it.
Yramede
Admittedly this is not a heavyweight book. But then, I don't read Terry Pratchett's Discworld series to be challenged mentally, I read them because they are fun. And Maskerade is one of Pratchett's best in that area. The book is mainly about poking fun at The Phantom of the Opera, and many other Andrew Lloyd Webber creations, with a simple storyline (although it does appear to be raising a character from a previous book to a more prominent role).
The allusions and parody in Maskerade are (moderately) subtle, so they don't interfere with the flow of the story (what there is of it). In fact, the book won't be anywhere near as enjoyable for someone who isn't familiar with the stage presentation of Phantom.

So if you are looking for an easy and enjoyable read, and have already read earlier books in the "Witches" line of Discworld, go for it.
Via
I love Terry Pratchett's books and his Discworld universe. This book is based off the Phantom of the Opera/opera classics. It wasn't bad, and I just finished rereading it but it's not quite up to the standards of his other books
Via
I love Terry Pratchett's books and his Discworld universe. This book is based off the Phantom of the Opera/opera classics. It wasn't bad, and I just finished rereading it but it's not quite up to the standards of his other books