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Black Halo epub download

by Sam Sykes


Home Sam Sykes Black Halo. The importance of the book is nothing worth noting unless it is also noted who had the book. In this case, after Miron, the new owners were the Abysmyths: giant, emaciated demons with the heads of fish who drown men on dry land.

Home Sam Sykes Black Halo. Part of Aeons Gate series by Sam Sykes. Fittingly enough, their leader, the Deepshriek, was even more horrendous.

Читать бесплатно Black Halo Sam Sykes. Текст этой книги доступен онлайн: o boil. You were hallucinating strange things, thoughts that never occurred to you before

Читать бесплатно Black Halo Sam Sykes. You were hallucinating strange things, thoughts that never occurred to you before. No, they aren’t!’ The last echoes of the voice vanished, forced out of his mind as he threw himself into a fervent rampage of thought. I am here to speak to someone about a book,’ Sheraptus said, smiling. I was intending to inquire as to its status. ‘I am pleased to have saved you the trouble. Текст этой книги доступен онлайн: ways ahead, eyes never moving, legs never stopping. Surely, Sheraptus reasoned, something so small would not know where it was going.

Seven Blades in Black book. Sam Sykes returns with a new fantasy that introduces to an unforgettable outcast magician caught between two warring empires. Among humans, none have power like mages. And among mages, none have will like Sal the Cacophony. Once revered, now vagrant, she walks a wasteland scarred by generations of magical warfare.

Sam Sykes' unique and energetic fantasy has carved out its own place in the fantasy landscape. Critics are arguing about the book but readers have fallen for its dark and twisted charms. This is a key fantasy for the new decade. Пользовательский отзыв - ladycato - ww. ibrarything. Sykes's Aeon's Gates Trilogy uses all the usual fantasy tropes but with inventive, vivid energy.

Sam Sykes’ first book Tome of the Undergates belongs to a select group of debut novels that takes familiar .

Sam Sykes’ first book Tome of the Undergates belongs to a select group of debut novels that takes familiar fantastical tropes and transforms them into something completely new. Knitting together great characterisation with bloodthirsty adventure and shameless humour, Sykes’ debut made itself a tough act to follow. The sequel, Black Halo, sees our band of socially-challenged rogues stranded and separated on a tropical island with only tubers to eat and their consciences for company.

Black Halo (Aeons' Gate is a Fantasy novel by Sam Sykes. Black Halo (Aeons' Gate The Tome of the Undergates has been recovered, and the gates of hell remain closed. Lenk and his five companions set sail to bring the accursed relic away from the demonic reach of Ulbecetonth, the Kraken Queen, but their ship crashes upon an island made of the bones left behind from a war long dead.

Sykes, Sam. It was a matter of instinct. It was a matter of instinct us they had not been given the talent by Riffid, thus they were not shict. She reminded herself of this. Her breathing was slow and steady, fear kept hidden deep, far away from her eyes. She sat up straight, resting on her knees, back rigid: Those with weak stances were easy prey; those who drew attention to themselves provoked sharp teeth.

Black Halo (Aeons Gate 2). Sam Sykes. The first book in a new trilogy from the acclaimed author of the Aeon's Gate series. Acclaimed author Sam Sykes returns with the second thrilling novel in his Bring Down Heaven series. The heart of civilization bleeds. Cier'Djaal, once the crowning glory of the civilized world, has gone from a city to a battlefield and a battlefield to a graveyard.

Black Halo epub download

ISBN13: 978-0575090347

ISBN: 0575090340

Author: Sam Sykes

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Gollancz (February 1, 2012)

ePUB size: 1108 kb

FB2 size: 1246 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 502

Other Formats: azw lrf docx mbr

Related to Black Halo ePub books

Nto
Book two of the Aeon's Gate trilogy picks up mere moments after the end of Tome of the Undergates with the intrepid Lenk recording recent events in his journal. The Tome of the Undergates has been recovered, and yet the gates of hell remain closed. Lenk and his five companions set sail to bring the accursed relic away from the demonic reach of Ulbecetonth, the Kraken Queen. But after weeks at sea, tensions amidst the adventurers are rising. Their troubles are only beginning when their ship crashes upon an island made of the bones left behind from a war long dead.

And it appears that bloodthirsty alien warrior women, fanatical beasts from the deep, and heretic-hunting wizards are the least of their concerns. Haunted by their pasts, plagued by their gods, tormented by their own people, and gripped by madness personal and peculiar, their greatest foes may yet be themselves.

Critics of the first book lamented that the characters were too thinly sketched, the bulk of the book being taken up by some longer than usual action scenes. In this second volume, Sykes flips that expectation on us. We delve deeper into each of the characters, getting more tantalizing glints of their depth and background as they recover on the island of the dead. To be sure, while the first book was a book of struggling, this second volume gives us a better understanding on why each of our characters - and I don't just mean our protagonists - are struggling and what it is they are trying to achieve. Which in the case of our (un)lucky band of adventurers is largely what they are struggling to run away from.

The problem, of course, is that we spend most of the book introspecting the characters, their flaws, backgrounds, motives, and favorite past times that we never quite make any headway in the story. In fact, the only real progress in the books is delivered by two new characters that are external to the adventurer party, one a librarian (don't snicker, librarians can kick your butt) on a mission to step any who use magic without paying the price (Oh Netherlings...), and the other who is commonly known as the Moth, a vassal of the Deep Shriek sent out to release the Father. The story advances under the stewardship of these two characters, but they have scenes too far and few between to give the rest of the novel momentum.

And this is why the second volume of a series usually drags. The first volume hit us with such force and speed, the second volume had a bar set higher than it could reasonably achieve.

And yet I will still recommend this book to you. It was a well written and fine addition to the series, with all the Shict loving you can handle. Hopefully in volume three, now that we understand what compels most of the POV characters in such detail already, we will return to the tour de force that was book one, but with a better understanding and appreciation of what is driving Lenk and his merry band.
Nto
Book two of the Aeon's Gate trilogy picks up mere moments after the end of Tome of the Undergates with the intrepid Lenk recording recent events in his journal. The Tome of the Undergates has been recovered, and yet the gates of hell remain closed. Lenk and his five companions set sail to bring the accursed relic away from the demonic reach of Ulbecetonth, the Kraken Queen. But after weeks at sea, tensions amidst the adventurers are rising. Their troubles are only beginning when their ship crashes upon an island made of the bones left behind from a war long dead.

And it appears that bloodthirsty alien warrior women, fanatical beasts from the deep, and heretic-hunting wizards are the least of their concerns. Haunted by their pasts, plagued by their gods, tormented by their own people, and gripped by madness personal and peculiar, their greatest foes may yet be themselves.

Critics of the first book lamented that the characters were too thinly sketched, the bulk of the book being taken up by some longer than usual action scenes. In this second volume, Sykes flips that expectation on us. We delve deeper into each of the characters, getting more tantalizing glints of their depth and background as they recover on the island of the dead. To be sure, while the first book was a book of struggling, this second volume gives us a better understanding on why each of our characters - and I don't just mean our protagonists - are struggling and what it is they are trying to achieve. Which in the case of our (un)lucky band of adventurers is largely what they are struggling to run away from.

The problem, of course, is that we spend most of the book introspecting the characters, their flaws, backgrounds, motives, and favorite past times that we never quite make any headway in the story. In fact, the only real progress in the books is delivered by two new characters that are external to the adventurer party, one a librarian (don't snicker, librarians can kick your butt) on a mission to step any who use magic without paying the price (Oh Netherlings...), and the other who is commonly known as the Moth, a vassal of the Deep Shriek sent out to release the Father. The story advances under the stewardship of these two characters, but they have scenes too far and few between to give the rest of the novel momentum.

And this is why the second volume of a series usually drags. The first volume hit us with such force and speed, the second volume had a bar set higher than it could reasonably achieve.

And yet I will still recommend this book to you. It was a well written and fine addition to the series, with all the Shict loving you can handle. Hopefully in volume three, now that we understand what compels most of the POV characters in such detail already, we will return to the tour de force that was book one, but with a better understanding and appreciation of what is driving Lenk and his merry band.
Naa
Let me start by saying, I did NOT like this book. At the start the book had promise, with our antiheroes recovering from their last battle and trying to return to the mainland. They had the tome, were licking their wounds, and were all set to collect on their reward. Misfortune struck as it always does, and our band of adventurers get split up, each going their separate ways. All of this was fine. What was not fine was the extended monologues they were all having in their heads. Between long conversions with dead relatives, agonies over whether or not one was a shict, and multiple personalities clamoring incessantly in one's head trying to make one choose path kill, survive or apathy, the story did not advance. It was painful plodding through this extended monologue of mental gymnastics but I kept up with it, hoping the curve in the story was going to come soon to make it all worth it. Suffuice it to say that did not happen for me. The parts in the reptile village was blase, and the build up to make the island of Teji seem terrifyingly mysterious and important fell flat. The battle with Sheraptus on the ship was okay and his character was nicely done, but not enough to save this hot mess of a book. Overall as I closed the final page in this book, I felt that it had advanced nowhere from book one. I struggled to reach the end, hoping desparately that Lenk would do something, anything to make me put the book down with a sense of accomplishment and a desire to get the next book. He did not, and I will not be reading the next book in this series. Sad. Because to me the series had promise...
Naa
Let me start by saying, I did NOT like this book. At the start the book had promise, with our antiheroes recovering from their last battle and trying to return to the mainland. They had the tome, were licking their wounds, and were all set to collect on their reward. Misfortune struck as it always does, and our band of adventurers get split up, each going their separate ways. All of this was fine. What was not fine was the extended monologues they were all having in their heads. Between long conversions with dead relatives, agonies over whether or not one was a shict, and multiple personalities clamoring incessantly in one's head trying to make one choose path kill, survive or apathy, the story did not advance. It was painful plodding through this extended monologue of mental gymnastics but I kept up with it, hoping the curve in the story was going to come soon to make it all worth it. Suffuice it to say that did not happen for me. The parts in the reptile village was blase, and the build up to make the island of Teji seem terrifyingly mysterious and important fell flat. The battle with Sheraptus on the ship was okay and his character was nicely done, but not enough to save this hot mess of a book. Overall as I closed the final page in this book, I felt that it had advanced nowhere from book one. I struggled to reach the end, hoping desparately that Lenk would do something, anything to make me put the book down with a sense of accomplishment and a desire to get the next book. He did not, and I will not be reading the next book in this series. Sad. Because to me the series had promise...
Duktilar
I liked this book a lot more than the first one, though I gave it the same 4 stars as the first.

There didn't seem to be nearly as much confusing dialogue, so either I've gotten used to it or he did a better job of keeping it clear. There did seem to be less of it as well.

Lots more plot develops in this book than in the first one. It's still long winded. How many hundreds of pages did I read where the lack of pants was the most pressing thing in the book? It seems like the whole book really. How happy I was when they finally managed to regain their pants, because it meant they would stop complaining about it.

They didn't let up with peeing, either. Lots of peeing.

There was more humor in this book. It was quite a bit funnier than the first. Funnier in a direct way. The first was a subdued humor, very dry. This book is more overt about it.

The survival of the party members is now completely over the top. Every unsurvivable encounter ends with each thinking the other is dead, and then they all get back together again.
Duktilar
I liked this book a lot more than the first one, though I gave it the same 4 stars as the first.

There didn't seem to be nearly as much confusing dialogue, so either I've gotten used to it or he did a better job of keeping it clear. There did seem to be less of it as well.

Lots more plot develops in this book than in the first one. It's still long winded. How many hundreds of pages did I read where the lack of pants was the most pressing thing in the book? It seems like the whole book really. How happy I was when they finally managed to regain their pants, because it meant they would stop complaining about it.

They didn't let up with peeing, either. Lots of peeing.

There was more humor in this book. It was quite a bit funnier than the first. Funnier in a direct way. The first was a subdued humor, very dry. This book is more overt about it.

The survival of the party members is now completely over the top. Every unsurvivable encounter ends with each thinking the other is dead, and then they all get back together again.
great ant
This book has and makes up for what Tome of the Undergates purposely did not, character development and albeit small amount of world building. The pacing in comparison to Tome of the Undergates is slower but do not let that deter you as the pacing is much better balanced between the gritty action and mayhem as well as true character growth. The characters in the story are more amazing and more believable because of the time taken in this book for there development and growth. I had some serious reservations going into this book for as much as I enjoyed the not stop mayhem of Tome of the Undergates it was lacking a few things such as true character development, world building etc... The same tropes that people have always mentioned of the first book and as fun as it was it would not make for a good continuation of the story if it had. Black Halo does NOT share those same pitfalls.

To sum it up I was happy to start reading and when finished, I was more thoughtful of the various plot lines in the story and more than ready for the next book. If you enjoyed Tome of the Undergates or you liked it but were looking for more world building, character development/growth then read Black Halo as a lot of that takes place here in The Aeons' Gate Book 2, Black Halo.
great ant
This book has and makes up for what Tome of the Undergates purposely did not, character development and albeit small amount of world building. The pacing in comparison to Tome of the Undergates is slower but do not let that deter you as the pacing is much better balanced between the gritty action and mayhem as well as true character growth. The characters in the story are more amazing and more believable because of the time taken in this book for there development and growth. I had some serious reservations going into this book for as much as I enjoyed the not stop mayhem of Tome of the Undergates it was lacking a few things such as true character development, world building etc... The same tropes that people have always mentioned of the first book and as fun as it was it would not make for a good continuation of the story if it had. Black Halo does NOT share those same pitfalls.

To sum it up I was happy to start reading and when finished, I was more thoughtful of the various plot lines in the story and more than ready for the next book. If you enjoyed Tome of the Undergates or you liked it but were looking for more world building, character development/growth then read Black Halo as a lot of that takes place here in The Aeons' Gate Book 2, Black Halo.