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Hope's End (Vel Chronicles) epub download

by Stephen Chambers


Hope's End (Vel Chronicles) Hardcover – August 11, 2001. First-time novelist Chambers, a University of Chicago sophomore, would seem an apt pupil of "write what you know" with this angst-ridden tale of a young man's struggle to define his own life

Hope's End (Vel Chronicles) Hardcover – August 11, 2001. by. Stephen Chambers (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. First-time novelist Chambers, a University of Chicago sophomore, would seem an apt pupil of "write what you know" with this angst-ridden tale of a young man's struggle to define his own life.

Start by marking Hope's End (Vel Chronicles, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Hope's End. Vel Chronicles (Volume 1). Stephen Chambers. Chamber's first novel uses the trappings of fantasy to depict a world separated from its technological roots and governed by fragments of lost knowledge

The Hope's End. Chamber's first novel uses the trappings of fantasy to depict a world separated from its technological roots and governed by fragments of lost knowledge. Stephen Chambers deserves to be feted. you just keep reading. A clever piece of work, a page turner that keeps you going all the way to the end. You won't want to put it down.

Hope's End by Stephen Chambers (Vel Chronicles). Stephen Chambers began his first novel, Hope's End, as a high school senior and completed it after attending the prestigious Odyssey Writing conference at New Hampshire College. Published April 1, 2010 by Tor Books.

Items related to Hope's End (Vel Chronicles). Stephen Chambers Hope's End (Vel Chronicles). ISBN 13: 9780312873493. Hope's End (Vel Chronicles). ISBN 10: 0312873492 ISBN 13: 9780312873493. Publisher: Tor Books, 2001.

Stephen Chambers began his first novel, Hope's End, as a high school senior and completed it after attending the prestigious Odyssey Writing conference at New Hampshire College. Библиографические данные. The Hope's End Vel Chronicles (Том 1). Автор. Tom Doherty Associates, 2010.

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The Hope's End - Stephen Chambers. Vel’s parents did own books. Writing and book production carried a death sentence, and book possession might bring ten or fifteen years in one of the Garrs; in prison. Criminals connected with black market books were often called Laumians, after a man named Laum who was killed twenty years before Vel was born.

Diane said: This book did not exactly leave me with warm, fluffy feelings of happily ever after. HOPE'S END (Vel Chronicles, by Stephen Chambers.

On a planet decimated by plague and political upheaval, young Vel has survived by living on his wits. A seasoned con man who has learned to think only of himself, Vel is forced to choose sides in a civil war. But the choice is made more complicated when Vel learns the truth about a mysterious alien race that predated the settlers of Hera.It turns out that Vel may not be who he thinks he is.

Hope's End (Vel Chronicles) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0312873493

ISBN: 0312873492

Author: Stephen Chambers

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (August 11, 2001)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB size: 1456 kb

FB2 size: 1880 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 666

Other Formats: mbr doc mobi docx

Related to Hope's End (Vel Chronicles) ePub books

OTANO
William Blake features as a central figure in this book, and in fact is in some remote sense one of the villains. The real target, though, is not so much the historical Blake as it is the late twentieth century's versions of nature romanticism and "small is beautiful" ideologies.
The dystopian future setting of this book is ruled by an enfeebled monarchy, and an authoritarian Church that forbids reading, and hoards a small cache of remaining technology which it uses to bedazzle an ignorant and oppressed population. The teachings of this Church seem to stem from this romantic, back to nature philosophy.
This critical philosophical and political content lends stature to what is in essence the old story of a thief who learns of his surprising heritage. As a result, this is a book that can be read on multiple levels, either as straight adventure and mystery or as a philosophical critique. The slow revelations of more details about both the history of the world, and the history of the main character, are handled well and sustain interest and suspense.
OTANO
William Blake features as a central figure in this book, and in fact is in some remote sense one of the villains. The real target, though, is not so much the historical Blake as it is the late twentieth century's versions of nature romanticism and "small is beautiful" ideologies.
The dystopian future setting of this book is ruled by an enfeebled monarchy, and an authoritarian Church that forbids reading, and hoards a small cache of remaining technology which it uses to bedazzle an ignorant and oppressed population. The teachings of this Church seem to stem from this romantic, back to nature philosophy.
This critical philosophical and political content lends stature to what is in essence the old story of a thief who learns of his surprising heritage. As a result, this is a book that can be read on multiple levels, either as straight adventure and mystery or as a philosophical critique. The slow revelations of more details about both the history of the world, and the history of the main character, are handled well and sustain interest and suspense.
Andriodtargeted
After five centuries on Hera, the human colony of Hope is an agricultural society dominated by the Council and the Church. However, the current cycle has been nasty as the five-year summer fails to arrive, leading to a scarcity of food for a hungry populace. On top of that, an alien deadly disease and the arrival of the dangerous Frill shake the planet further. When the King dies, Chief Council Hillor pushes forward his plan to have the wealthy handle food distribution while Church leader Lord Denon turns to the Holy Scripture as written by William Blake for guidance.
Meanwhile a street punk Vel rejects the notion of laboring in the fields because he preferring cons and stealing. That changes when he learns he is in the succession to the vacant throne of Hope. Though he refuses to become involved in the power struggle, Hillor and others want to use Vel. If they cannot, one of the factions or perhaps a Frill will simply kill Vel. <
HOPE'S END is an engaging science fiction book that plays out on multiple levels. The coming of age of the hero Vel is the prime theme of the story line, but choices for the other key participants permeate the plot and making it very complex. The novel starts slow so that the readers can understand the fully developed society, but eventually picks up to light year speed. Stephen Chambers provides quite a debut that will rock genre fans with the hope of a new talent for many years to come.

Harriet Klausner
Andriodtargeted
After five centuries on Hera, the human colony of Hope is an agricultural society dominated by the Council and the Church. However, the current cycle has been nasty as the five-year summer fails to arrive, leading to a scarcity of food for a hungry populace. On top of that, an alien deadly disease and the arrival of the dangerous Frill shake the planet further. When the King dies, Chief Council Hillor pushes forward his plan to have the wealthy handle food distribution while Church leader Lord Denon turns to the Holy Scripture as written by William Blake for guidance.
Meanwhile a street punk Vel rejects the notion of laboring in the fields because he preferring cons and stealing. That changes when he learns he is in the succession to the vacant throne of Hope. Though he refuses to become involved in the power struggle, Hillor and others want to use Vel. If they cannot, one of the factions or perhaps a Frill will simply kill Vel. <
HOPE'S END is an engaging science fiction book that plays out on multiple levels. The coming of age of the hero Vel is the prime theme of the story line, but choices for the other key participants permeate the plot and making it very complex. The novel starts slow so that the readers can understand the fully developed society, but eventually picks up to light year speed. Stephen Chambers provides quite a debut that will rock genre fans with the hope of a new talent for many years to come.

Harriet Klausner
Brazil
I hate to be critical of something that someone puts so much work into, but the book is a real downer. The dialog needs work and it's a bit too gruesome (think Medieval/Dark Ages Europe meets Planet of the Apes (original)). It reads like it was written by someone who is fairly intelligent, but coming out of a hopeless depression (and used William Blake to pull himself out of it). It's hard to follow in parts; the characters have no depth - there's no real development - they just sort of do what they do. It did have redeeming qualities though: it had some fairly good insight into human character, darker points in history...
Plot: Nazi, Stalin... type regime made up of old school Mormons lands on an inhospitable world (much like Utah, beautiful though it is) and through bids for power manage to destroy most their knowledge, technology, and purpose (envision Roman Empire to Dark Ages Europe). 500 yrs go by and a weakening monarchy is overtaken by an evil advisor when a typical teenage thief gets caught in the middle of various bids for power... Oh, and there are some aliens that make the book a bit interesting, though not enough for me to want to read the sequel.
If that's your kind of book then the author did an excellent job and my recomendations. If you're looking for a fun book, or like reading novels where you come to care for the characters, this isn't it.
Brazil
I hate to be critical of something that someone puts so much work into, but the book is a real downer. The dialog needs work and it's a bit too gruesome (think Medieval/Dark Ages Europe meets Planet of the Apes (original)). It reads like it was written by someone who is fairly intelligent, but coming out of a hopeless depression (and used William Blake to pull himself out of it). It's hard to follow in parts; the characters have no depth - there's no real development - they just sort of do what they do. It did have redeeming qualities though: it had some fairly good insight into human character, darker points in history...
Plot: Nazi, Stalin... type regime made up of old school Mormons lands on an inhospitable world (much like Utah, beautiful though it is) and through bids for power manage to destroy most their knowledge, technology, and purpose (envision Roman Empire to Dark Ages Europe). 500 yrs go by and a weakening monarchy is overtaken by an evil advisor when a typical teenage thief gets caught in the middle of various bids for power... Oh, and there are some aliens that make the book a bit interesting, though not enough for me to want to read the sequel.
If that's your kind of book then the author did an excellent job and my recomendations. If you're looking for a fun book, or like reading novels where you come to care for the characters, this isn't it.
Cala
This book had a great start... 1)a city civilization fallen from technology on a distant planet, 2)an unusual social structure derived from Nazi socialism, 3)a threatening alien culture, and 4) religious/political intrigue.
With all those ideas to build on, I expected an interesting read. However, the shallow characters and hollow dialogue robbed the plot of its depth. With the dark themes and cold brutality of many of the characters, it was probably a good thing that they weren't developed further. At least when (almost) all the characters die, I didn't really know them enough to care. The ending was a bloodbath that didn't resolve many of the open ends of the plot. I assume that in the next book, more of the ends will be tied up, but I don't care enough about the story or the characters to read it. As a work of literature, the book is consistent with its title - Hope's End. As a story, it falls apart.
Cala
This book had a great start... 1)a city civilization fallen from technology on a distant planet, 2)an unusual social structure derived from Nazi socialism, 3)a threatening alien culture, and 4) religious/political intrigue.
With all those ideas to build on, I expected an interesting read. However, the shallow characters and hollow dialogue robbed the plot of its depth. With the dark themes and cold brutality of many of the characters, it was probably a good thing that they weren't developed further. At least when (almost) all the characters die, I didn't really know them enough to care. The ending was a bloodbath that didn't resolve many of the open ends of the plot. I assume that in the next book, more of the ends will be tied up, but I don't care enough about the story or the characters to read it. As a work of literature, the book is consistent with its title - Hope's End. As a story, it falls apart.