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Oblivion Hand:: A Tale of the Voidal (Wildside Fantasy) epub download

by Adrian Cole


Book in the Voidal Trilogy Series). Sword & sorcery at its best - the first of the Voidal trilogy, assembling Adrian Cole's sword & sorcery series for the first time.

Book in the Voidal Trilogy Series).

Sword & sorcery at its best and first of the Voidal trilogy, assembled from the author's short stories. The Long Reach of Night (the Voidal Trilogy, Book 2). Adrian Cole. См. также: Зарубежное фэнтези. Once more the cursed warrior, The Voidal and his bizar. т 1050. Darkness & Dawn Volume 2 - Beyond the Great Oblivion. George Allen England.

Title: Oblivion Hand:: A Tale of the Voidal (Wildside Fantasy) Author(s): Adrian Cole ISBN: 1-58715-466-8 .

Oblivion Hand:: A Tale of the Voidal (Wildside Fantasy)

Oblivion Hand:: A Tale of the Voidal (Wildside Fantasy). Sword & sorcery at its best and first of the Voidal trilogy, assembled from the author's short stories. Throughout all universes and dimensions, a great darkness is gathering, forging itself into a monstrous force bent on an all-consuming path of destruction. Against this impending cataclysm stands one man - the enigmatic Voidal, creature of myth and legend, and with him a small band of reluctant followers, themselves god-cursed renegades.

Producer Книга по Требованию. Book Художественная литература Фантастика. Sword & sorcery at its best and first of the Voidal trilogy, assembled from the author"s short stories. Pages 228. Year of production 2001. Мистика Зарубежное фэнтези. 67 руб. Arsene Lupin Vs. Herlock Sholmes: A Classic Tale of the World"s Greatest Thief and the World"s Greatest Detective! EAN 9781587154645 97. 7 руб.

Oblivion Hand: The Voidal, Vol. 1. by Adrian Cole. Publisher: Wildside PressReleased: Sep 5, 2012ISBN: 9781479490066Format: book. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. carousel previous carousel next.

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Adrian Cole was born in Plymouth, Devonshire in 1949. The Sleep of Giants (1983). The Hand of the Voidal (1984). Blood Red Angel (1993). Storm Over Atlantis (2001). Cole's father was in the Army, and Adrian spent three years with his family in Malaya when he was a young child, before settling back in Devon.

Sword & sorcery at its best and first of the Voidal trilogy, assembled from the author's short stories.

Oblivion Hand:: A Tale of the Voidal (Wildside Fantasy) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1587154669

ISBN: 1587154668

Author: Adrian Cole

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Wildside Press (January 19, 2005)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB size: 1475 kb

FB2 size: 1402 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 200

Other Formats: lit doc lrf txt

Related to Oblivion Hand:: A Tale of the Voidal (Wildside Fantasy) ePub books

Mayno
A magnificent combination of heroic questing in a fantastic Lovecraftian multiverse. The central conceit is a man known only as the Voidal: a wanderer stripped of his memories and cursed to respond whenever he is invoked, and to bring on a horrific fate to all concerned.

The format is a collection of adventures, often with the Voidal acting as a guest-star, responding to someone in trouble and bringing on doom, but the author avoids the danger of a formulaic plot: the Voidal soon evidences a personality of his own as he grows and changes, determined to have his memories and life restored and to have freedom from being a pawn of the gods, and very often he faces and overcomes temptation, doing right and helping innocents gets out of a tight situation rather than condemning them to save his own interests.

Extra points for the companions the Voidal soon collects in his wanderings, including a musician with the goal of saving his love, who has been imprisoned in an instrument, and a sardonic imp who attaches himself to the Voidal as his familiar and indispensable dogsbody, regardless of how the Voidal feels about the arrangement.

If you're looking for a blend of Lovecraftian and heroic fantasy, you can't go wrong with this!
Mayno
A magnificent combination of heroic questing in a fantastic Lovecraftian multiverse. The central conceit is a man known only as the Voidal: a wanderer stripped of his memories and cursed to respond whenever he is invoked, and to bring on a horrific fate to all concerned.

The format is a collection of adventures, often with the Voidal acting as a guest-star, responding to someone in trouble and bringing on doom, but the author avoids the danger of a formulaic plot: the Voidal soon evidences a personality of his own as he grows and changes, determined to have his memories and life restored and to have freedom from being a pawn of the gods, and very often he faces and overcomes temptation, doing right and helping innocents gets out of a tight situation rather than condemning them to save his own interests.

Extra points for the companions the Voidal soon collects in his wanderings, including a musician with the goal of saving his love, who has been imprisoned in an instrument, and a sardonic imp who attaches himself to the Voidal as his familiar and indispensable dogsbody, regardless of how the Voidal feels about the arrangement.

If you're looking for a blend of Lovecraftian and heroic fantasy, you can't go wrong with this!
Yozshugore
The 1970s was a golden age for sword and sorcery fiction in the small press. Young writers such as Charles Saunders, David C. Smith, Lew Cabos, David Madison, Charles de Lint, Richard L. Tierney breathed new exciting life into the genre in crude, saddlestapled magazines such as Space & Time, Fantasy Crossroads, Dark Fantasy, and Fantasy Tales to name a few. One of these young Turks was Adrian Cole. Cole hails from Devon in Britain, Solomon Kane country. He represents the fantastic edge of sword and sorcery fiction. Oblivion Hand (Wildside Press) is a collection of stories culled from those magazines 30 or more years ago. All feature the Voidal. The Voidal is a sort of destroying angel used by the Dark Gods to work their will and vengeance. Stripped of memory, in each story, he attempts to gain knowledge of who or what he is and regain his memory. To describe the stories, think of H. P. Lovecraft writing sword and sorcery, returning to the Dreamlands but written in his later, darker style. There is some Michael Moorcock influence present with the idea of the "omniverse" and the Voidal being sent to different dimensions. Cole uses words to create names in the manner of Tolkien. Names such as Tallyman, Nighteye, Windwrack appear. Cole combines simple Anglo-Saxon words to create new ones. He has a very unique style and good command of language. Fans of Clark Ashton Smith take note though I would not call Adrian Cole's writing style Smithish. Generally with collections anymore, I like to space the stories out one a week or even one a month to prevent repetition. I ended up reading one per day. Years ago, I had read "Astral Stray" in the anthology Heroic Fantasy which I mentioned yesterday. The story failed to make much impression with me twenty-five years ago. Turns out "Astral Stray" is a sort of bridging story on how the imp Elfloq came to serve the Voidal. Reading the stories sequentially was the way to go. Reading these early stories by Cole gave me a greater appreciation for his greatest work, the Omaran series. This is Cole's big four volume fantasy series that includes A Place Among the Fallen, Throne of Fools, The King of Light and Shadows, and The Gods in Anger. I once described the series as reading as if Tolkien had written for Weird Tales. I consider it to be one of the most important fantasy series of the 1980s. I have a fever and the only prescription is more sword and sorcery. Oblivion Hand helps feed that hunger.
Yozshugore
The 1970s was a golden age for sword and sorcery fiction in the small press. Young writers such as Charles Saunders, David C. Smith, Lew Cabos, David Madison, Charles de Lint, Richard L. Tierney breathed new exciting life into the genre in crude, saddlestapled magazines such as Space & Time, Fantasy Crossroads, Dark Fantasy, and Fantasy Tales to name a few. One of these young Turks was Adrian Cole. Cole hails from Devon in Britain, Solomon Kane country. He represents the fantastic edge of sword and sorcery fiction. Oblivion Hand (Wildside Press) is a collection of stories culled from those magazines 30 or more years ago. All feature the Voidal. The Voidal is a sort of destroying angel used by the Dark Gods to work their will and vengeance. Stripped of memory, in each story, he attempts to gain knowledge of who or what he is and regain his memory. To describe the stories, think of H. P. Lovecraft writing sword and sorcery, returning to the Dreamlands but written in his later, darker style. There is some Michael Moorcock influence present with the idea of the "omniverse" and the Voidal being sent to different dimensions. Cole uses words to create names in the manner of Tolkien. Names such as Tallyman, Nighteye, Windwrack appear. Cole combines simple Anglo-Saxon words to create new ones. He has a very unique style and good command of language. Fans of Clark Ashton Smith take note though I would not call Adrian Cole's writing style Smithish. Generally with collections anymore, I like to space the stories out one a week or even one a month to prevent repetition. I ended up reading one per day. Years ago, I had read "Astral Stray" in the anthology Heroic Fantasy which I mentioned yesterday. The story failed to make much impression with me twenty-five years ago. Turns out "Astral Stray" is a sort of bridging story on how the imp Elfloq came to serve the Voidal. Reading the stories sequentially was the way to go. Reading these early stories by Cole gave me a greater appreciation for his greatest work, the Omaran series. This is Cole's big four volume fantasy series that includes A Place Among the Fallen, Throne of Fools, The King of Light and Shadows, and The Gods in Anger. I once described the series as reading as if Tolkien had written for Weird Tales. I consider it to be one of the most important fantasy series of the 1980s. I have a fever and the only prescription is more sword and sorcery. Oblivion Hand helps feed that hunger.
Worla
Excellent work of dark fantasy in the tradition of Clark Ashton Smith and Darrell Schweitzer. Brilliantly inventive, worlds spun out of thin air like nowhere you've been before in the fantasy genre. Intriguing characters, dark humor, and deep, thoughtful undertones with a weighty premise that grows with each passing story. Not quite profound, but it doesn't seem that is what the author is attempting. A worthy way to spend your fantasy budget. I will offer my dissenting opinion, however, against the majority who seem to love the secondary character Elfloq. Fun, but detracted somewhat from what I liked best about the story--the varied sights and adventures, the darkly dreaming atmosphere, the sense of the inexorable pull of fate. Still, not a criticism, merely my preference. Fans of dark fantasy will find much to enjoy here.
Worla
Excellent work of dark fantasy in the tradition of Clark Ashton Smith and Darrell Schweitzer. Brilliantly inventive, worlds spun out of thin air like nowhere you've been before in the fantasy genre. Intriguing characters, dark humor, and deep, thoughtful undertones with a weighty premise that grows with each passing story. Not quite profound, but it doesn't seem that is what the author is attempting. A worthy way to spend your fantasy budget. I will offer my dissenting opinion, however, against the majority who seem to love the secondary character Elfloq. Fun, but detracted somewhat from what I liked best about the story--the varied sights and adventures, the darkly dreaming atmosphere, the sense of the inexorable pull of fate. Still, not a criticism, merely my preference. Fans of dark fantasy will find much to enjoy here.
Zorve
I second what the other review said about the book.

I first came across the Voidal in the story "Astral Stray" in a print anthology many years ago, and have been trying to find the rest of the stories of the Voidal ever since. Thanks to e-publishing, I can now complete my reading of the saga.

The writing in this first volume is rough in patches, especially the earlier stories. you can see Adrian Cole is attempting to imitate some fantasy stylists with the language, which in all honestly, verges on purple prose at times.

But the premise is solid, and the milieu of the Multiverse is incredibly inventive. Weird creatures mine the corpse of a long-dead and forgotten god; the Universe of Islands... you can actually see the improvements in the writing with every story. Ideas enough to fill several modern-day fantasy novels (drawn out, thick tomes with about 1 happening in its entire 700 page length) are casually tossed around in short stories and novellas.

Recommended!

PS. The later volumes improve and get even better.
Zorve
I second what the other review said about the book.

I first came across the Voidal in the story "Astral Stray" in a print anthology many years ago, and have been trying to find the rest of the stories of the Voidal ever since. Thanks to e-publishing, I can now complete my reading of the saga.

The writing in this first volume is rough in patches, especially the earlier stories. you can see Adrian Cole is attempting to imitate some fantasy stylists with the language, which in all honestly, verges on purple prose at times.

But the premise is solid, and the milieu of the Multiverse is incredibly inventive. Weird creatures mine the corpse of a long-dead and forgotten god; the Universe of Islands... you can actually see the improvements in the writing with every story. Ideas enough to fill several modern-day fantasy novels (drawn out, thick tomes with about 1 happening in its entire 700 page length) are casually tossed around in short stories and novellas.

Recommended!

PS. The later volumes improve and get even better.