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by C.J. Cherryh


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Sale of this book without a front cover may be unauthorized. If this book is coverless, it may have been reported to the publisher as unsold or destroyed and neither the author nor the publisher may have received payment for it. A Del Rey Book. Published by Ballantine Books. All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copy-right Conventions.

Carolyn Janice Cherry (born September 1, 1942), better known by the pen name C. J. Cherryh, is an American writer of speculative fiction. She has written more than 80 books since the mid-1970s, including the Hugo Award-winning novels Downbelow Station (1981) and Cyteen (1988), both set in her Alliance-Union universe.

American writer C. Cherryh's career began with publication of her first books in 1976, Gate of Ivrel and Brothers of Earth. She has been a prolific science fiction and fantasy author since then, publishing over 80 novels, short-story compilations, with continuing production as her blog attests. Ms. Cherryh has received the Hugo and Locus Awards for some of her novels.

J. Cherryh YVGENIE THE GHOST BOY Eveshka had a dreadful impression of danger. She ran across the yard and headlong down the slope to the ferry dock, toward the river. Past the gray, weathered boat she ran, then down the overgrown shoreline, fending her way through reeds and a thin screen of young birches. Her daughter Ilyana was standing there, wrapped in mist. Two lovers, one mortal, one-a ghost. Ilyana! Eveshka threw up an arm.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In ancient Russia, the battle between good and evil draws in three young wizards-Pyetr, Eveshka, and Sasha. A stupendous achievement! Cherryh brings her Rusalka series a step further with this fantasy novel, evoking mythological roots that nurture us all. The premise of wizardry being a matter of mere wishes in the pre-Christian Russia is the precursor to the practice of Christian prayer. If a wizard is forbidden to wish for anything for himself, that is the corrolary to the Lord's Prayer.

Currently resident in Spokane, Washington, . Cherryh has won four Hugos and is one of the best-selling and most critically acclaimed authors in the science fiction and fantasy field. She is the author of more than forty novels. Her hobbies include travel, photography, reef culture, Mariners baseball, and, a late passion, figure skating: she intends to compete in the adult USFSA track.

J. Cherryh eBook Online Read. Author: C. Cherryh. Published Year: 2013 Science Fiction. Published Year: 2010 Science FictionFantasy. Published Year: 1987 FantasyScience FictionHistory & Fiction. Published Year: 1984 Science Fiction. Published Year: 1990 FantasyScience Fiction.

A stupendous achievement! Cherryh brings her Rusalka series a step further with this fantasy novel, evoking mythological roots that nurture us all.

Yvgenie I feel that C. Cherryh outdid herself considering that this was her first book.

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. C. Cherryh celebrated it because the books were an elaboration of her untold stories and they were finally being jotted down in print. The books were published in 1976. A year later, C. Cherry was recognized for her work and this led to an unforeseen recognition by the John Campbell Award for Best New Writer. I feel that C. I would recommend this book to both beginners and advanced readers of both non-fiction and fiction novels. This story is breath-taking and even as you read it, you are tempted to live the fantasy in your own reality.

But she had no desire to go up to that awful doorway. She walked the whole circuit of the hill, hoping another path through the thorns might lead out.

But she had no desire to go up to that awful doorway ll and the palace of bone, and all the while the ghostly wolves lay about the door, the bear lazed near them, and Owl, faithless Owl, who should have guided her out of this, kept a watch from a white and dreadful ledge above the porch. She did not have to see them. She could wish not to see any ghosts at all and they would be gone until her resolve weakened.

In ancient Russia, the battle between good and evil draws in three young wizards--Pyetr, Eveshka, and Sasha

Yvgenie epub download

ISBN13: 978-0345367846

ISBN: 0345367847

Author: C.J. Cherryh

Category: Fantasy

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Del Rey; 1st edition (October 15, 1991)

Pages: 280 pages

ePUB size: 1967 kb

FB2 size: 1647 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 794

Other Formats: azw doc rtf mobi

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Vrion
This book and the whole series is fantastic...up until the end, which is horrible. There are half a dozen plot lines that just don't get any kind of resolution and there's a hoard of life and death issues that, as of the last few paragraphs, everyone is just suddenly ok with. It's like the author got bored writing and just said "Ok, they're all happy. The End."
I tell you what, if my niece or daughter were dating a guy possessed by a deadly wizard-ghost that could eat her life energy and that of every other living thing around causing wide spread death where I live, on top of the fact that said guy and wizard-ghost couldn't tell themselves apart anymore, I don't think I'd just be cool with it, even if both were in love with her. Call me old fashioned.
And the leshies all just up and dying as part of this grand, unexplained scheme to have the aforementioned daughter do...something? Unexplained. The great unnamed evil of the magical world that Sasha has been contemplating since book one and is the thing the leshies may or may not have been trying to battle? Unexplained. The witch who trained Draga and Ulamets possibly being Chernavog's mother and part of the unnamed evil? Is she wishing for the events? Are the leshies battling her? Unexfuckingsplained.
Why, WHY would an author get my hopes up with a badass, well written Russian fairy tale-based trilogy with character developments and multiple plotlines ONLY to crush any hope I had with a pathetic final chapter where literally nothing gets resolved except finding a wife for one of the characters that the author conveniently pulls out of a literary ass (oh it's my best friends secret, unknown daughter? That's cool, not weird at all)? Unexplained.
Fcuk you and your weirdly pronounced name and book, CJ Cherryh. I had SUCH high hopes.
Vrion
This book and the whole series is fantastic...up until the end, which is horrible. There are half a dozen plot lines that just don't get any kind of resolution and there's a hoard of life and death issues that, as of the last few paragraphs, everyone is just suddenly ok with. It's like the author got bored writing and just said "Ok, they're all happy. The End."
I tell you what, if my niece or daughter were dating a guy possessed by a deadly wizard-ghost that could eat her life energy and that of every other living thing around causing wide spread death where I live, on top of the fact that said guy and wizard-ghost couldn't tell themselves apart anymore, I don't think I'd just be cool with it, even if both were in love with her. Call me old fashioned.
And the leshies all just up and dying as part of this grand, unexplained scheme to have the aforementioned daughter do...something? Unexplained. The great unnamed evil of the magical world that Sasha has been contemplating since book one and is the thing the leshies may or may not have been trying to battle? Unexplained. The witch who trained Draga and Ulamets possibly being Chernavog's mother and part of the unnamed evil? Is she wishing for the events? Are the leshies battling her? Unexfuckingsplained.
Why, WHY would an author get my hopes up with a badass, well written Russian fairy tale-based trilogy with character developments and multiple plotlines ONLY to crush any hope I had with a pathetic final chapter where literally nothing gets resolved except finding a wife for one of the characters that the author conveniently pulls out of a literary ass (oh it's my best friends secret, unknown daughter? That's cool, not weird at all)? Unexplained.
Fcuk you and your weirdly pronounced name and book, CJ Cherryh. I had SUCH high hopes.
inform
love all of cj cherryh's book.
inform
love all of cj cherryh's book.
Jwalextell
This is a fantasy story set in ≈ 1800's Russia. There are wizards who only have to wish to make it so. They have learned to not wish carelessly and that even if a wish does not come true right now, it is still there to become manifest when conditions are right. They are living near a river away from everyone else so their daughter, Ilyana, can grow into being a wizard without distractions village life would have had.
The problem is that she, as a child, is given the freedom to go places and explore and play as any child might do. But, down by the river she meets a boy a bit older than herself and plays with him. He is only a spirit and he can not make any noises. They grow up and when she is fifteen (15) years old, he starts to talk with her. She just wants to make her parents happy and be a good girl for them, but they just do not understand this other boy. Only they do know this other boy, he is one they dealt with, badly, in the past before she was born. This spirit takes control of another boy, Yvgenie, and has Ilyana go on an expedition into the woods. They are chased by her parents and faux uncle because they are afraid that evil mischief will ensue if this spirit does as he intends.
I got 150 or so pages in and just put it down. It was not all that enthalling.
Jwalextell
This is a fantasy story set in ≈ 1800's Russia. There are wizards who only have to wish to make it so. They have learned to not wish carelessly and that even if a wish does not come true right now, it is still there to become manifest when conditions are right. They are living near a river away from everyone else so their daughter, Ilyana, can grow into being a wizard without distractions village life would have had.
The problem is that she, as a child, is given the freedom to go places and explore and play as any child might do. But, down by the river she meets a boy a bit older than herself and plays with him. He is only a spirit and he can not make any noises. They grow up and when she is fifteen (15) years old, he starts to talk with her. She just wants to make her parents happy and be a good girl for them, but they just do not understand this other boy. Only they do know this other boy, he is one they dealt with, badly, in the past before she was born. This spirit takes control of another boy, Yvgenie, and has Ilyana go on an expedition into the woods. They are chased by her parents and faux uncle because they are afraid that evil mischief will ensue if this spirit does as he intends.
I got 150 or so pages in and just put it down. It was not all that enthalling.
Ka
There are elements that are the most engaging of the trilogy, and it benefits from having the magic and wider community come more clearly into focus. However the pre-existing series and Cherryh's general writing approach is ill-suited to the amount of teenage angst that is introduced in this book, and the centering on this element weakens the interest in the story. Again good, but the weakest volume in the series.

Worse than: Exile's Gate by C. J. Cherryh
Better than: Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold
Ka
There are elements that are the most engaging of the trilogy, and it benefits from having the magic and wider community come more clearly into focus. However the pre-existing series and Cherryh's general writing approach is ill-suited to the amount of teenage angst that is introduced in this book, and the centering on this element weakens the interest in the story. Again good, but the weakest volume in the series.

Worse than: Exile's Gate by C. J. Cherryh
Better than: Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold
Fearlesshunter
A stupendous achievement! Cherryh brings her Rusalka series a step further with this fantasy novel, evoking mythological roots that nurture us all. The premise of wizardry being a matter of mere wishes in the pre-Christian Russia is the precursor to the practice of Christian prayer. If a wizard is forbidden to wish for anything for himself, that is the corrolary to the Lord's Prayer. Wizard emerges as sacred priest, which in fact the witches and artist's were in the pre-Christian world. Sasha at last finds the reward he deserves for all his self-denying loyalty to his friends Pyetr and Eveshka.
The dual nature of Pyetr's legitimate daughter's lover, (uncorrupted youth and evil, but redeemable spector) leads us to a deep understanding of the nature of love and of life--mortality consists not of the foreknowlege of death in the future, but the awareness that death is always with us, even as we breathe.
It also resonates on the Ressurection: love and loyalty engender rebirth.
The plot comes to a delightful conclusion, nimbly assisted by ubiquitous and adorable vodka-guzzling Yard Thing, Babi. (I seem to remember being a House Thing at my Grandmother's, called "Hoppy".)
Although the characters in the trilogy, "Rusalka", "Chernevog", and "Yvgenie" seem exotic, being wizards, ghosts, and former ghosts, they serve as a reflection of our own deeper nature: Eveshka has no powers any ordinary woman does not have. Having been alive once, then a ghost, then alive again, she is simply more aware of her connection with what Clarissa Pinkola Estes terms 'Veshka's "life-death-life nature", in Estes' wonderful treatist, "Women Who Run With the Wolves." Moreover, when Eveshka had been a ghost, in her rusalka mode, she was the classic study of an anorexic maiden, with the same parental influences that bring about anorexia in a real child.
The fact that Pyetr had the courage to face the dangers inherent in living with a rusalka and in befriending a wizard demonstrates that he earned the right to enjoy life as the head of his somewhat unconventional household.
Cherryh is a great lady, and a great writer. There is plenty of room left here for a sequel: "Et tu," Hwiiur?
Fearlesshunter
A stupendous achievement! Cherryh brings her Rusalka series a step further with this fantasy novel, evoking mythological roots that nurture us all. The premise of wizardry being a matter of mere wishes in the pre-Christian Russia is the precursor to the practice of Christian prayer. If a wizard is forbidden to wish for anything for himself, that is the corrolary to the Lord's Prayer. Wizard emerges as sacred priest, which in fact the witches and artist's were in the pre-Christian world. Sasha at last finds the reward he deserves for all his self-denying loyalty to his friends Pyetr and Eveshka.
The dual nature of Pyetr's legitimate daughter's lover, (uncorrupted youth and evil, but redeemable spector) leads us to a deep understanding of the nature of love and of life--mortality consists not of the foreknowlege of death in the future, but the awareness that death is always with us, even as we breathe.
It also resonates on the Ressurection: love and loyalty engender rebirth.
The plot comes to a delightful conclusion, nimbly assisted by ubiquitous and adorable vodka-guzzling Yard Thing, Babi. (I seem to remember being a House Thing at my Grandmother's, called "Hoppy".)
Although the characters in the trilogy, "Rusalka", "Chernevog", and "Yvgenie" seem exotic, being wizards, ghosts, and former ghosts, they serve as a reflection of our own deeper nature: Eveshka has no powers any ordinary woman does not have. Having been alive once, then a ghost, then alive again, she is simply more aware of her connection with what Clarissa Pinkola Estes terms 'Veshka's "life-death-life nature", in Estes' wonderful treatist, "Women Who Run With the Wolves." Moreover, when Eveshka had been a ghost, in her rusalka mode, she was the classic study of an anorexic maiden, with the same parental influences that bring about anorexia in a real child.
The fact that Pyetr had the courage to face the dangers inherent in living with a rusalka and in befriending a wizard demonstrates that he earned the right to enjoy life as the head of his somewhat unconventional household.
Cherryh is a great lady, and a great writer. There is plenty of room left here for a sequel: "Et tu," Hwiiur?