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Freak Nation: A Field Guide to 101 of the Most Odd, Extreme, and Outrageous American Subcultures epub download

by Kate Stevens


Kate Stevens uses a pen name to protect the innocent, but she is no stranger to the weird and wonderful fringe of American culture

Kate Stevens uses a pen name to protect the innocent, but she is no stranger to the weird and wonderful fringe of American culture. She's written everything from books on sex to career guides to articles for The Christian Science Monitor. It examines 101 of the best-known American subcultures, ranging from the nearly mainstream (collectors of stamps, coins, and comic books) to the most visibly notable (Trekkies, cosplayers (.

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Kate Stevens: Freak Nation. Retrieved May 19, 2010.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Freak Nation: A Field Guide to 101 of. .The Cult of the Individual is alive and well and expressing itself all over America-and this book proves it.

The Cult of the Individual is alive and well and expressing itself all over America-and this book proves it.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. HERO: Dr. George Heath, founder of the American Numismatics Association, which celebrates its twentieth year in 2011. Sorry, George! The guy on the quarter, aka George Washington, opposed the idea of putting presidential portraits on coinage, because he thought it smacked too much of the king's noble visage on currency.

book by Kate Stevens.

Freak Nation by Kate Stevens - Vegans. With this enlightening (and sometimes frightening) field guide, you'll delve into the customs, mores, and motivations behind every type of fan, geek, and superfreak, including: Swingers.

With this enlightening (and sometimes frightening) field guide, you'll delve into the customs, mores, and motivations behind every type of fan, geek, and superfreak, including . Books related to Freak Nation.

With this enlightening (and sometimes frightening) field guide, you'll delve into the customs, mores, and motivations behind every type of fan, geek, and superfreak, including: Swingers.

Vegans. Skateboarders. Trekkies. The Cult of the Individual is alive and well and expressing itself all over America--and this book proves it. With this enlightening (and sometimes frightening) field guide, you'll delve into the customs, mores, and motivations behind every type of fan, geek, and superfreak, including:SwingersHackersDungeon MastersHappening ArtistsCryptozoologistsUtopiansBohemiansShrinersOenophilesDeadheadsFrom music to food, sports to fashion, there are people who take their "hobbies" to an extreme the rest of us can only imagine. With this book, you'll get a bird's-eye view of these hobbies gone wild--from sea to shining sea!

Freak Nation: A Field Guide to 101 of the Most Odd, Extreme, and Outrageous American Subcultures epub download

ISBN13: 978-1440506468

ISBN: 1440506469

Author: Kate Stevens

Category: Entertainment

Subcategory: Puzzles & Games

Language: English

Publisher: Adams (November 16, 2010)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1367 kb

FB2 size: 1549 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 727

Other Formats: txt mobi doc azw

Related to Freak Nation: A Field Guide to 101 of the Most Odd, Extreme, and Outrageous American Subcultures ePub books

Mori
Freak Nation is a bathroom reader that is flimsy even by the standards of the genre. I think the author did most of her research watching VH-1 and occasionally hitting Wikipedia when she wanted to give her flabby bullet points a little patina of being something more than flotsam she pulled out of her nether regions.

It's not humorous. It's not informative. It's not interesting. It's borderline insulting how editorially sloppy it is. And the author doesn't even feign being interested in the groups she writes about.

Thing is, the idea of the book - a compendium of subcultures - is pretty interesting. My hope is that one day, someone who has taste, compassion, wit and a work ethic tackles it.
Mori
Freak Nation is a bathroom reader that is flimsy even by the standards of the genre. I think the author did most of her research watching VH-1 and occasionally hitting Wikipedia when she wanted to give her flabby bullet points a little patina of being something more than flotsam she pulled out of her nether regions.

It's not humorous. It's not informative. It's not interesting. It's borderline insulting how editorially sloppy it is. And the author doesn't even feign being interested in the groups she writes about.

Thing is, the idea of the book - a compendium of subcultures - is pretty interesting. My hope is that one day, someone who has taste, compassion, wit and a work ethic tackles it.
Otrytrerl
Like all the "field guides" that have blossomed in the years since the appearance of the Preppie Handbook, this one, while written with tongue slightly in cheek, has many pointedly accurate observations to make about those segments of society that aren't afraid to proclaim "that we are unique, our own person, and dedicated to not entirely fitting in." It examines 101 of the best-known American subcultures, ranging from the nearly mainstream (collectors of stamps, coins, and comic books) to the most visibly notable (Trekkies, cosplayers (i.e., people who like to dress up as and pretend to be favorite fictional characters), Rennies (attendees at Renaissance Faires, perhaps more accurately Creative Anachronists), steampunkers, and Civil War re-enactors), to tattoo artists and local thespians, vegans and locavores, fans of various music genres, ghost hunters, birders, skateboarders, D&D players, fringe political movements, motorcyclists, MENSA members, and on out the other side to the ones that make us feel just a little creeped out (hoarders, survivalists). Each two- or three-page chapter explains "who they are"--that is, what defines each subculture--who their heroes are, their most distinctive trait, the biggest controversy and misconception about them, how to recognize them, and how you might resemble them even if you don't "go all the way." And, as author Kate Stevens points out, many of these groups include names highly respected in more conventional fields, such as real-life model railroaders Tom Brokaw and Eric Clapton, stamp collector Franklin D. Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson (who planted the very first vineyard in America and so is a hero to oenophiles), Michelle Obama (who planted a veggie garden on the White House grounds, making her not only First Lady but First Locavore), and Orlando Bloom (who not only played an elf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, but declared that "Elves are cool, man"). It's meant to be humorous (and you may well find it in the humor section of your bookstore), but it's also a perceptive examination of an aspect of sociology that many of us may not have thought much about, but that in some ways is the most American way to be an American, celebrating true--chosen--diversity.
Otrytrerl
Like all the "field guides" that have blossomed in the years since the appearance of the Preppie Handbook, this one, while written with tongue slightly in cheek, has many pointedly accurate observations to make about those segments of society that aren't afraid to proclaim "that we are unique, our own person, and dedicated to not entirely fitting in." It examines 101 of the best-known American subcultures, ranging from the nearly mainstream (collectors of stamps, coins, and comic books) to the most visibly notable (Trekkies, cosplayers (i.e., people who like to dress up as and pretend to be favorite fictional characters), Rennies (attendees at Renaissance Faires, perhaps more accurately Creative Anachronists), steampunkers, and Civil War re-enactors), to tattoo artists and local thespians, vegans and locavores, fans of various music genres, ghost hunters, birders, skateboarders, D&D players, fringe political movements, motorcyclists, MENSA members, and on out the other side to the ones that make us feel just a little creeped out (hoarders, survivalists). Each two- or three-page chapter explains "who they are"--that is, what defines each subculture--who their heroes are, their most distinctive trait, the biggest controversy and misconception about them, how to recognize them, and how you might resemble them even if you don't "go all the way." And, as author Kate Stevens points out, many of these groups include names highly respected in more conventional fields, such as real-life model railroaders Tom Brokaw and Eric Clapton, stamp collector Franklin D. Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson (who planted the very first vineyard in America and so is a hero to oenophiles), Michelle Obama (who planted a veggie garden on the White House grounds, making her not only First Lady but First Locavore), and Orlando Bloom (who not only played an elf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, but declared that "Elves are cool, man"). It's meant to be humorous (and you may well find it in the humor section of your bookstore), but it's also a perceptive examination of an aspect of sociology that many of us may not have thought much about, but that in some ways is the most American way to be an American, celebrating true--chosen--diversity.
Zahisan
Don't really understand the previous reviews for the most part. If you have a bookshelf for " Modern Cultural History" this should be on it. I've lived through most all of this and the author nails it for the most part. I would disagree on a few points like the Beatles being hook-laden pop music. Yeah, I know, certain simple chords and progressions that get to a person yet nobody else has managed to come close. And I'm not a Bearllemaniac. My favorite is old hymns. The Beatles with the music/lyric combo is probably the most timeless music since electricity was tamed. Oddly, to me, I've been a few things in this book and had no idea there was a label. Mainly somewhere between a Locavore and whatever the label is for "gardener". A Freak in the 60's-early 70's ( hippie was a Life Magazine word if I remember right and none of us longhairs accepted it). Been a few other things briefly going by the labels. Phases. But this is a good read that is about true as you can get. Oh, never have met a psychobilly and don't want to.
Zahisan
Don't really understand the previous reviews for the most part. If you have a bookshelf for " Modern Cultural History" this should be on it. I've lived through most all of this and the author nails it for the most part. I would disagree on a few points like the Beatles being hook-laden pop music. Yeah, I know, certain simple chords and progressions that get to a person yet nobody else has managed to come close. And I'm not a Bearllemaniac. My favorite is old hymns. The Beatles with the music/lyric combo is probably the most timeless music since electricity was tamed. Oddly, to me, I've been a few things in this book and had no idea there was a label. Mainly somewhere between a Locavore and whatever the label is for "gardener". A Freak in the 60's-early 70's ( hippie was a Life Magazine word if I remember right and none of us longhairs accepted it). Been a few other things briefly going by the labels. Phases. But this is a good read that is about true as you can get. Oh, never have met a psychobilly and don't want to.
Conjuril
There's something satisfying about putting things into groups, and this book does just that. It's definitely not an in-depth sociological study, but it is fun. And I learned plenty-- this was the first place I heard about 'steampunks,' which led me to a deeper investigation of that group. When I saw a steampunked computer on the internet, I knew what they were talking about. And that may be the point. It's not an exhaustive description of each category, but it does whet your appetite for more.

She divides the subcultures into groups that sounds like a list of newspaper sections:
Collectibles
Fashion
Art
Food and Drink
Lifestyles
Music
Sports and Games
Pastimes and Careers
Politics
Sex
Society
Technology

I thought it was a fun read, and I still go back to it for quick entertainment and knowledge-junkie satisfaction. Who knew what a 501st Legionnaire was? Or a yarn bomber, bilderberger, or rivethead? Well, now I do.
Conjuril
There's something satisfying about putting things into groups, and this book does just that. It's definitely not an in-depth sociological study, but it is fun. And I learned plenty-- this was the first place I heard about 'steampunks,' which led me to a deeper investigation of that group. When I saw a steampunked computer on the internet, I knew what they were talking about. And that may be the point. It's not an exhaustive description of each category, but it does whet your appetite for more.

She divides the subcultures into groups that sounds like a list of newspaper sections:
Collectibles
Fashion
Art
Food and Drink
Lifestyles
Music
Sports and Games
Pastimes and Careers
Politics
Sex
Society
Technology

I thought it was a fun read, and I still go back to it for quick entertainment and knowledge-junkie satisfaction. Who knew what a 501st Legionnaire was? Or a yarn bomber, bilderberger, or rivethead? Well, now I do.
Uaha
For light humor and half-hearted science lovers. Not a true reference book. Does have a few funny moments loosely based on facts.
Uaha
For light humor and half-hearted science lovers. Not a true reference book. Does have a few funny moments loosely based on facts.