» » Paul Keres : The Road to the Top

Paul Keres : The Road to the Top epub download

by Paul Keres


Paul Keres vs Alexander Alekhine Margate 1937 Spanish Game: Morphy Defense.

Paul Keres vs Alexander Alekhine Margate 1937 Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Дебют для всех любителей шахмат.

Two Books for 1 USD. ChessOK books Paul Keres: The Road to the Top. Paul Keres: The Road to the Top. 2-11-2018.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Paul Keres: The Road to the Top as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Books – septembre-octobre 2019. Views: 73. Date: October 15, 2019. Views: 261. Date: October 2, 2019. Kama Sutra – A Modern Guide to the Ancient Art of Sex. Views: 168. Date: October 13, 2019.

Paul Keres: The Road to the Top by Paul Keres & John Nunn. The same gentleman who is responsible for the Keres 194i book is working on an English translation of 4 X 25. Paul Keres: The Quest for Perfection by Paul Keres & John Nunn. Power Chess by Paul Keres.

Chess book with theories,tactics. Flag for inappropriate content. saveSave Paul Keres - The Road to the Top - Keres For Later. Thccontiuuaton rclstorc- lcvc alhsdcultcs It was onlylatcrthat lcarntthat thc dcntcalpostou had alrcady Kcru~Kere: J! ocurrcd n thc amc Marshall- Duras,Karlsbad I. hitccon- tnucdin thatamc wth c3! and ositon.

Paul Keres was a great player in chess history and a contender for the world championship for a third of a century. 3 people are interested in this title. We receive fewer than 1 copy every 6 months.

Paul Keres (; January 7, 1916 – June 5, 1975) was an Estonian chess grandmaster and chess writer. He was among the world's top players from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s

Paul Keres (; January 7, 1916 – June 5, 1975) was an Estonian chess grandmaster and chess writer. He was among the world's top players from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s. Keres narrowly missed a chance at a world championship match on five occasions.

You get BOTH Keres books!!! PAUL KERES 2 Vols: ROAD TO THE TOP & QUEST FOR PERFECTION * PAUL KERES: THE ROAD TO THE TOP * An Expanded New Edition Of A Modern Classic * Paul Keres is generally regarded as the strongest player never to become world champion. His modesty, honesty and open-minded approach to chess made him popular with chess enthusiasts the world over. The reader will find lots of wild sacrificial tactics in the early games of his 30 year chess career. "The author and editor, Grandmaster John Nunn, helps the reader understand the secrets of chess."-publisher. Chess Digest Editor Ken Smith writes: "Setting at a table in a local steak house in San Antonio, Texas (1972) were Keres, Gligoric and myself. Gligoric is teasing Keres with `when are you going to speak out against your Communist masters?'. Not a word in retort from the kind, gentle, Keres." 256 pages * IGM PAUL KERES IGM John Nunn * 256 Pages * OP 1st Ed * 1996 * 8vo PB * 7 Chapters * 51 Games * PAUL KERES: QUEST FOR PERFECTION * An Expanded New Edition Of A Modern Classic * This is the 2nd & final volume covering the period from 1950 to his death in 1975. Subtitle: Inspiration and Instruction For Chess Players Of All Levels. Here are 103 deeply annotated best games. There is an introduction to each chapter to give you the background of what is happening. Keres annotates most and GM John Nunn follows by selecting and annotating the finest from 1962-1975. ("My instructive draw, San Antonio 1972, was not selected".-Ken Smith * IGM PAUL KERES IGM John Nunn * 272 Pages * 1st Ed * 1996 * 8vo PB * 7 Chapters * 53 Games * List Price for both = $47.90, yet here are both for less than the price of 1. We'll send you an email with our, as of August 28, 2018, 55 FREE selections, so that you may make your THREE (3) selections!

Paul Keres : The Road to the Top epub download

ISBN13: 978-0713480542

ISBN: 0713480548

Author: Paul Keres

Category: Entertainment

Subcategory: Puzzles & Games

Language: English

Publisher: Chrysalis Books Group (July 31, 1996)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1802 kb

FB2 size: 1637 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 100

Other Formats: doc rtf mobi docx

Related to Paul Keres : The Road to the Top ePub books

WinDImmortaL
I have not finished this book, but I was moved to write a review of what I've read so far. Outstanding. I often hear that Alekhine was a great annotator. Bah, humbug! As far as I'm concerned Keres is the model of a perfect annotator, at least for a player below expert strength. The variations provided are plentiful and deep enough to provide food for thought without being overwhelming (unlike say Kasparov's MGP series, which has encyclopedic annotations of some games, which overwhelms the non-master). Beyond simply citing moves, Keres delves into the intricacies of the positions, explaining plans and strategies. This book will help anyone's game improve. Can't wait to finish, and I'm going to buy Vol 2 immediately.
WinDImmortaL
I have not finished this book, but I was moved to write a review of what I've read so far. Outstanding. I often hear that Alekhine was a great annotator. Bah, humbug! As far as I'm concerned Keres is the model of a perfect annotator, at least for a player below expert strength. The variations provided are plentiful and deep enough to provide food for thought without being overwhelming (unlike say Kasparov's MGP series, which has encyclopedic annotations of some games, which overwhelms the non-master). Beyond simply citing moves, Keres delves into the intricacies of the positions, explaining plans and strategies. This book will help anyone's game improve. Can't wait to finish, and I'm going to buy Vol 2 immediately.
Tholmeena
Computers now have a huge presence in chess. The Super-GMs uses them to train, other chess professionals use them for databases on games, and many average club players use them as a lesson in humility. The beauty of this book is that it was written well before computers really had any presence in chess. This is book 1 of a two part series which comprise Keres' collection of best games. Keres does a wonderful job annotating the games because he really has an eye for the transitional points in a game.

What you won't find in this book ...

Long variations with short unjustified assessments
Routine wins
Endless variations that really don't contribute to the theme of the game

But what you will find in this book are ..

Insightful comments that draw out the essence of the positions
Personal thoughts that occurred during the games that perhaps lead to key game transitions
Lessons in how to balance positional complexity against decisions to take the game into technical wins
Analysis from one of the greatest players in chess

One of Keres' strength comes from his extended postal play. If you play postal chess (now correspondence chess because it's typically over email), you'll know that calculating variations is much different than over-the-board play. Correspondence chess allows one to get a real "feel" for the middlegame structures. I can see this very clearly in Keres' annotations and game descriptions. Often in the book he'll write a whole paragraph (and often more) on the intrinsic plans for each side. Interestingly, he uses the term "positional sacrifice" and then provides the explanation of why it is sound (or not sound). One of the signs of a truly strong player is to judge correctly the benefits of a sacrifice. I really believe that is one of the benefits of this book.

The book does have some additional comments from John Nunn. As the book progressed, the comments got fewer and fewer, but part of that may have something to do with the quality of the games. The book itself starts with his early competitive career in the late 20s and ends in the late 40s as he is competing in the post-war tournament to replace Alekhine as champion. Personally, i found his comments on opening systems very intriguing and educational. Keres' style is very universal because he could play almost any position. He generally played positions that gave him a good chance for equality and then "waited" for his opponent to make an inaccuracy that would allow him to either equalize as black or take the initiative an already equal position. Keres was truly trying to teach his audience how to get a sense for the initiative and then keep it.

Although Keres has been criticized for possible collaborations with the Germans during World War II, the value of this book should not be diminished by whatever mistakes he might have made in that turbulent time. The book does include some biographical remarks before each section, but the war years was limited to comment on two tournaments (and results) in Salzburg and Munich. But overall, the book really has the elements to make almost any chess player better. His target audience is an advanced club player, but the book is approachable for almost anyone (even beginners with some diligence). This is one of Batsford's best books, even if it now may be out of print.
Tholmeena
Computers now have a huge presence in chess. The Super-GMs uses them to train, other chess professionals use them for databases on games, and many average club players use them as a lesson in humility. The beauty of this book is that it was written well before computers really had any presence in chess. This is book 1 of a two part series which comprise Keres' collection of best games. Keres does a wonderful job annotating the games because he really has an eye for the transitional points in a game.

What you won't find in this book ...

Long variations with short unjustified assessments
Routine wins
Endless variations that really don't contribute to the theme of the game

But what you will find in this book are ..

Insightful comments that draw out the essence of the positions
Personal thoughts that occurred during the games that perhaps lead to key game transitions
Lessons in how to balance positional complexity against decisions to take the game into technical wins
Analysis from one of the greatest players in chess

One of Keres' strength comes from his extended postal play. If you play postal chess (now correspondence chess because it's typically over email), you'll know that calculating variations is much different than over-the-board play. Correspondence chess allows one to get a real "feel" for the middlegame structures. I can see this very clearly in Keres' annotations and game descriptions. Often in the book he'll write a whole paragraph (and often more) on the intrinsic plans for each side. Interestingly, he uses the term "positional sacrifice" and then provides the explanation of why it is sound (or not sound). One of the signs of a truly strong player is to judge correctly the benefits of a sacrifice. I really believe that is one of the benefits of this book.

The book does have some additional comments from John Nunn. As the book progressed, the comments got fewer and fewer, but part of that may have something to do with the quality of the games. The book itself starts with his early competitive career in the late 20s and ends in the late 40s as he is competing in the post-war tournament to replace Alekhine as champion. Personally, i found his comments on opening systems very intriguing and educational. Keres' style is very universal because he could play almost any position. He generally played positions that gave him a good chance for equality and then "waited" for his opponent to make an inaccuracy that would allow him to either equalize as black or take the initiative an already equal position. Keres was truly trying to teach his audience how to get a sense for the initiative and then keep it.

Although Keres has been criticized for possible collaborations with the Germans during World War II, the value of this book should not be diminished by whatever mistakes he might have made in that turbulent time. The book does include some biographical remarks before each section, but the war years was limited to comment on two tournaments (and results) in Salzburg and Munich. But overall, the book really has the elements to make almost any chess player better. His target audience is an advanced club player, but the book is approachable for almost anyone (even beginners with some diligence). This is one of Batsford's best books, even if it now may be out of print.
Netlandinhabitant
This book contains Paul Keres' best games played in the period 1929-1950. And as one might imagine, almost all the games are against World class players. What sets this book apart from many others of its genre is the annotations. Another reviewer rightly mentioned that Keres' style of annotation is as good as Bronstein. Those who are familiar with David Bronstein's books will get the point. The book has around 250 pages and covers 50 of Keres' games. This might give you some idea as to how detailed the annotations would be(unlike the lightly annotated books that cover a players' 100 or more games in the same number of pages). The games are all Keres' wins but at no point one feels even the slightest hint of personal bias in his annotations. They are highly objective and very detailed. Keres clearly explains the plans of both the sides and devotes around 5-6 pages to almost every game. He gives detailed variations where necessary but nothing to overwhelm an average player.
The one slight dissappointment that I have from this book is that I expected it to be a complete autobiography of Keres' life. But Keres doesn't talk much about his life in general or shares any interesting chessic stories or incidents that might have happened in his life(unlike Tal in his autobiography). All he mentions is the tournaments and matches he participated in a given year and how he felt his standard of play was compared to other successful players. But this shouldn't keep anyone away from buying this book. This book would've been worth its price even if it had no autobiography. The set of games are worth studying.
Finally I would like to say that even though the games are highly annotated, a sound understanding of both tactics and basic chess strategy is needed. The level of the games is high and so I feel that this book will be most useful to players over 1700(uscf). Also the footnotes added by John Nunn are in no way a nuisance(as mentioned by another reviewer). I was amazed to see that after going over 35 games, there was no occassion when even a single variation given by Keres was completely wrong. All Nunn does is is add to what Keres had to say or point out another interesting idea or variation that Keres probably ignored.
In conclusion I would like to say that these games have been thoroughly scrutinized by their creator and there aren't simply many chess books that match this book's content. So you can't afford to miss it.
Netlandinhabitant
This book contains Paul Keres' best games played in the period 1929-1950. And as one might imagine, almost all the games are against World class players. What sets this book apart from many others of its genre is the annotations. Another reviewer rightly mentioned that Keres' style of annotation is as good as Bronstein. Those who are familiar with David Bronstein's books will get the point. The book has around 250 pages and covers 50 of Keres' games. This might give you some idea as to how detailed the annotations would be(unlike the lightly annotated books that cover a players' 100 or more games in the same number of pages). The games are all Keres' wins but at no point one feels even the slightest hint of personal bias in his annotations. They are highly objective and very detailed. Keres clearly explains the plans of both the sides and devotes around 5-6 pages to almost every game. He gives detailed variations where necessary but nothing to overwhelm an average player.
The one slight dissappointment that I have from this book is that I expected it to be a complete autobiography of Keres' life. But Keres doesn't talk much about his life in general or shares any interesting chessic stories or incidents that might have happened in his life(unlike Tal in his autobiography). All he mentions is the tournaments and matches he participated in a given year and how he felt his standard of play was compared to other successful players. But this shouldn't keep anyone away from buying this book. This book would've been worth its price even if it had no autobiography. The set of games are worth studying.
Finally I would like to say that even though the games are highly annotated, a sound understanding of both tactics and basic chess strategy is needed. The level of the games is high and so I feel that this book will be most useful to players over 1700(uscf). Also the footnotes added by John Nunn are in no way a nuisance(as mentioned by another reviewer). I was amazed to see that after going over 35 games, there was no occassion when even a single variation given by Keres was completely wrong. All Nunn does is is add to what Keres had to say or point out another interesting idea or variation that Keres probably ignored.
In conclusion I would like to say that these games have been thoroughly scrutinized by their creator and there aren't simply many chess books that match this book's content. So you can't afford to miss it.
Goldfury
The basic material in this book, and its companion, Paul Keres: The Quest for Perfection (also available from Amazon) were previously published under another title. British GM John Nunn has updated the notes and added some games.
The result is a book that every serious chessplayer should have. Keres' deep notes will help players from Class C on up to improve their games and get more enjoyment out of chess.
Goldfury
The basic material in this book, and its companion, Paul Keres: The Quest for Perfection (also available from Amazon) were previously published under another title. British GM John Nunn has updated the notes and added some games.
The result is a book that every serious chessplayer should have. Keres' deep notes will help players from Class C on up to improve their games and get more enjoyment out of chess.