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Memo from David O. Selznick : The Creation of "Gone with the Wind" and Other Motion Picture Classics, as Revealed in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks epub download

by Rudy Behlmer,Roger Ebert,David O. Selznick


David O. Selznick was a unique figure in the golden Hollywood studio era. He produced some of the greatest and .

David O. He produced some of the greatest and most memorable American films ever made-notably, Rebecca, A Star Is Born, Anna Karenina, A Farewell to Arms, and, above all, Gone With the Wind. Although Selznick could fire through to you a 5 page memo arguing indeed it WAS collaboration and because of his many successes he was doing you a very great favour of which you should be eternally grateful. So many people must have stormed off yelling, "Do it yourself!" From the safe distance of not having to work for him, this book is an utterly fascinating and instructive, enlightening read. Selznick was infamous for his impassioned, eloquent, witty and sometimes raging memos to directors .

Collected here, they stand as an illuminating look at the movie business.

Memo from David O. Selznick : The Creation of "Gone with the Wind" and Other Motion Picture Classics, as Revealed in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks. 0375755314 (ISBN13: 9780375755316). Selznick : The Creation of Gone with the Wind and Other Motion Picture Classics, as Revealed in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks full book. net/pdf?id 0375755314. Memo from David O. Selznick PDF Part1. Get notified when Memo from David O. Selznick by David O. Selznick is updated.

Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks. Unknown - Please report. Become a fan. Author David O. Selznick. Selznick is remembered for writing hundreds of thousands of memos. The section on Gone With The Wind is extensive, originally Selznick did not want to purchase the novel, deeming it too expensive. The rest, as we all know, is history. Trivia: he also produced Gone With the Wind. These 500 pages of small print represent a tiny selection of the total. Selznick wasn’t just around for the Golden Age, didn’t just work for seemingly everyone worth working for, didn’t just bring Alfred Hitchcock over, discover Ingrid Bergman, produce Gone With the Wind and do much, much more. Great reading for anyone interested in Hollywood and the people who made the movies. The Creation of Gone With the Wind and Other Motion-Picture Classics–as Reveale d in the Producer’s Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums and. By David O. Selznick Introduction by Roger Ebert. Part of Modern Library Movies. David O. He produced some of the greatest and most memorable American films ever made–notably, Rebecca, A Star Is Born, Anna Karenina, A Farewell to Arms, and, above all, Gone With the Wind.

Publisher : Random House Publishing Group

Publisher : Random House Publishing Group. The Creation of Gone With the Wind and Other Motion-Picture Classics-as Reveale d in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums and.

17 Quoted in Memo from David O. Selznick: The Creation of "Gone with the Wind" and Other Motion Picture Classics, as Revealed in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks, ed. Rudy Behlmer (New York: Modern Library. Rudy Behlmer (New York: Modern Library, 2000), 288. 18 Silvia Bovenschen, "Is There a Feminine Aesthetic?" New German Critique 10 (1977): esp. 132-37. I'm Not the Sort of Person Men Marry': Monsters, Queers, and Hitchcock's Rebecca.

"The most revealing, penetrating book on filmmaking I know of . . ."--King VidorDavid O. Selznick was a unique figure in the golden Hollywood studio era. He produced some of the greatest and most memorable American films ever made--notably, Rebecca, A Star Is Born, Anna Karenina, A Farewell to Arms, and, above all, Gone With the Wind. Selznick'sabsolute power and artistic control are evidenced in his impassioned, eloquent, witty, and sometimes rageful memos to directors, writers, stars and studio executives, writings that have become almost as famous as his films. Newsweek wrote,"I can't imagine how a book on the American movie business could be more illuminating, more riveting or more fun to read than this collection of David Selznick's memos.

Memo from David O. Selznick : The Creation of "Gone with the Wind" and Other Motion Picture Classics, as Revealed in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks epub download

ISBN13: 978-0375755316

ISBN: 0375755314

Author: Rudy Behlmer,Roger Ebert,David O. Selznick

Category: Entertainment

Subcategory: Movies

Language: English

Publisher: Modern Library; 2000 ed. edition (March 7, 2000)

Pages: 632 pages

ePUB size: 1727 kb

FB2 size: 1784 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 356

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Related to Memo from David O. Selznick : The Creation of "Gone with the Wind" and Other Motion Picture Classics, as Revealed in the Producer's Private Letters, Telegrams, Memorandums, and Autobiographical Remarks ePub books

Dellevar
David O. Selznick (1902-65) along with agent brother Myron was the son of a Hollywood mogul who went bust. Selnick rose to prominence at the RKO and Paramount studios. He was a producer of genius who provided excellent product to the movie masses. Selznick later labored at MGM under the oversight of Irving Thalberg and his father in law the formidable Louis B. Mayer. Selznick was married to Irene Meyer Seznick until 1949. In 1949 he married Jennifer Jones the Oscar winninig actress and former wife of actor Robert Walker.
Selznick, of course, will always be chiefly known for his production of "Gone With the Wind" one of the greatest movies ever made. The 1939 blockbuster took a year to make as Selznick high on benzadrine worked 18-20 hours a day on the film. He was a perfectionist who knew GWTW would be his chief legacy. Selznick used three directors on the film including George Cukor, Sam Woods and Victor Fleming (Fleming won best director for his efforts at the Oscar ceremony.) Selznick was a stickler for accuracy in period costuming, cost efficiency and getting the maximum effort out of his major players: Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Olivia DeHavilland and Leslie Howard. Over 100 pages in this book are devoted to Gone With the Wind as Selznick wrote lengthy memos to his employees, Margaret Mitcehll, Loew's , MGM and Selznick International personnel.
Selznick also produced such film classics as "Duel in the Sun"; "Dinner at 8"; "Tender is the Night"; "David Copperfield" "A Tale of Two Cities"; "Love is a Many Splendored Thing" Hitchcock's directorial debut in America
"Rebecca" and Hitch's "Notorious."
Selznick was a driven man who demanded total oversight over his productions. He could drive directors, stars and management bonkers but got the job done as well as he could see it done. He is the greatest producer of motion pictures who has ever lived.
Rudy Behlmer, the editor of these memos, sifted through over 2000 boxes of Selznick material to cull out the memos published in this 1972 book. The book has been reissued with an introduction by Roger Ebert. The book is now included in the Modern Library Film Book series.
This book is an essential in even a modest library on the cinema.
Dellevar
David O. Selznick (1902-65) along with agent brother Myron was the son of a Hollywood mogul who went bust. Selnick rose to prominence at the RKO and Paramount studios. He was a producer of genius who provided excellent product to the movie masses. Selznick later labored at MGM under the oversight of Irving Thalberg and his father in law the formidable Louis B. Mayer. Selznick was married to Irene Meyer Seznick until 1949. In 1949 he married Jennifer Jones the Oscar winninig actress and former wife of actor Robert Walker.
Selznick, of course, will always be chiefly known for his production of "Gone With the Wind" one of the greatest movies ever made. The 1939 blockbuster took a year to make as Selznick high on benzadrine worked 18-20 hours a day on the film. He was a perfectionist who knew GWTW would be his chief legacy. Selznick used three directors on the film including George Cukor, Sam Woods and Victor Fleming (Fleming won best director for his efforts at the Oscar ceremony.) Selznick was a stickler for accuracy in period costuming, cost efficiency and getting the maximum effort out of his major players: Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Olivia DeHavilland and Leslie Howard. Over 100 pages in this book are devoted to Gone With the Wind as Selznick wrote lengthy memos to his employees, Margaret Mitcehll, Loew's , MGM and Selznick International personnel.
Selznick also produced such film classics as "Duel in the Sun"; "Dinner at 8"; "Tender is the Night"; "David Copperfield" "A Tale of Two Cities"; "Love is a Many Splendored Thing" Hitchcock's directorial debut in America
"Rebecca" and Hitch's "Notorious."
Selznick was a driven man who demanded total oversight over his productions. He could drive directors, stars and management bonkers but got the job done as well as he could see it done. He is the greatest producer of motion pictures who has ever lived.
Rudy Behlmer, the editor of these memos, sifted through over 2000 boxes of Selznick material to cull out the memos published in this 1972 book. The book has been reissued with an introduction by Roger Ebert. The book is now included in the Modern Library Film Book series.
This book is an essential in even a modest library on the cinema.
Golden Lama
Selznick was a genius. His memos re GONE WITH THE WIND are sooooo interesting to read. In today's world we 'micro managers' get a bad name, but there's alot to be said for Selznick's mico managing, without it we'd never have the classic we all love.
Golden Lama
Selznick was a genius. His memos re GONE WITH THE WIND are sooooo interesting to read. In today's world we 'micro managers' get a bad name, but there's alot to be said for Selznick's mico managing, without it we'd never have the classic we all love.
Zadora
An epic film and an epic tale that nearly killed all of the participants- a great read and look at classic Hollywood.
Zadora
An epic film and an epic tale that nearly killed all of the participants- a great read and look at classic Hollywood.
Naa
The life of a producer has its extreme highs and lows, and Selznick faithfully recorded them all in his letters to family, friends, colleagues, and rivals. A very personal look at "film history."
Naa
The life of a producer has its extreme highs and lows, and Selznick faithfully recorded them all in his letters to family, friends, colleagues, and rivals. A very personal look at "film history."
bass
He only read half of it because he isn't used to reading books on a tablet. He likes discount used books instead.
bass
He only read half of it because he isn't used to reading books on a tablet. He likes discount used books instead.
Ynonno
About 30+ years after I must have received this book as a gift, or bought it, it caught my eye upon visiting my old bedroom at my parents' house.

Unread.

Considering my professional life has been in film and video production, I could not believe what was presenting there on the bottom shelf of the bookcase. My cover is not like this latest release (mine a purple-tinged photo of Scarlett walking amongst the injured Civil War soldiers, plus an introduction by only the author himself and not Roger Ebert)... but ostensibly the very same book.

My conclusion: the greatest book on filmmaking that anyone interested in any aspect of feature films could read. If your knowledge of movies and the people involved stretches back into Hollywood's Golden Age, you should find it hard to put this book down. If you actually make films yourself, the incredible insight into the rationale of decisions, the wheeling, dealing, art and business choices is a golden gift..

I don't think you could ever take rejection personally ever again after witnessing how Selznick's decisions (often motoring at breakneck speed through piles of creatives), were rarely personal, but all about the minutiae of achieving his vision, and doing it in hopefully the most cost effective way. His instructions to his underlings to find writers for instance, in the early days, was often to find someone really talented, who had just had a string of miserable failures, so that Selznick could get them cheaply. To overlook a more successful writer was not a personal decision, but a scheming practical one.

Selznick's incredible and audacious capacity to creatively micro-manage on a sub-atomic scale probably never before encountered comes across as the biggest revelation, and explains his many fallouts with artists who understandably could not in a million lifetimes tolerate his incessant meddling and demands of control. He would watch everything (and I mean EVERYTHING) they did either standing right behind them, seemingly with binoculars, giving counter-orders, or watching through a high-powered telescope from a distance and firing through never-ending suggestions that weren't ever short of self-promotion and rationalisation, most arguments circling back to his impressive track record.

This micro-management surely reached its zenith when he was promoting his second wife Jennifer Jones for parts and agonising over her career advancement and the pictures she was in having to look good in every possible way.

And agree or disagree with him, for the most part you can't fault his track record, nor his vast experience, and so he had pretty solid ground upon which to stand. Albeit he drove many people insane who refused to collaborate in a way which was clearly not collaboration in the usually accepted sense. (Although Selznick could fire through to you a 5 page memo arguing indeed it WAS collaboration and because of his many successes he was doing you a very great favour of which you should be eternally grateful.) So many people must have stormed off yelling, "Do it yourself!"

From the safe distance of not having to work for him, this book is an utterly fascinating and instructive, enlightening read.
Ynonno
About 30+ years after I must have received this book as a gift, or bought it, it caught my eye upon visiting my old bedroom at my parents' house.

Unread.

Considering my professional life has been in film and video production, I could not believe what was presenting there on the bottom shelf of the bookcase. My cover is not like this latest release (mine a purple-tinged photo of Scarlett walking amongst the injured Civil War soldiers, plus an introduction by only the author himself and not Roger Ebert)... but ostensibly the very same book.

My conclusion: the greatest book on filmmaking that anyone interested in any aspect of feature films could read. If your knowledge of movies and the people involved stretches back into Hollywood's Golden Age, you should find it hard to put this book down. If you actually make films yourself, the incredible insight into the rationale of decisions, the wheeling, dealing, art and business choices is a golden gift..

I don't think you could ever take rejection personally ever again after witnessing how Selznick's decisions (often motoring at breakneck speed through piles of creatives), were rarely personal, but all about the minutiae of achieving his vision, and doing it in hopefully the most cost effective way. His instructions to his underlings to find writers for instance, in the early days, was often to find someone really talented, who had just had a string of miserable failures, so that Selznick could get them cheaply. To overlook a more successful writer was not a personal decision, but a scheming practical one.

Selznick's incredible and audacious capacity to creatively micro-manage on a sub-atomic scale probably never before encountered comes across as the biggest revelation, and explains his many fallouts with artists who understandably could not in a million lifetimes tolerate his incessant meddling and demands of control. He would watch everything (and I mean EVERYTHING) they did either standing right behind them, seemingly with binoculars, giving counter-orders, or watching through a high-powered telescope from a distance and firing through never-ending suggestions that weren't ever short of self-promotion and rationalisation, most arguments circling back to his impressive track record.

This micro-management surely reached its zenith when he was promoting his second wife Jennifer Jones for parts and agonising over her career advancement and the pictures she was in having to look good in every possible way.

And agree or disagree with him, for the most part you can't fault his track record, nor his vast experience, and so he had pretty solid ground upon which to stand. Albeit he drove many people insane who refused to collaborate in a way which was clearly not collaboration in the usually accepted sense. (Although Selznick could fire through to you a 5 page memo arguing indeed it WAS collaboration and because of his many successes he was doing you a very great favour of which you should be eternally grateful.) So many people must have stormed off yelling, "Do it yourself!"

From the safe distance of not having to work for him, this book is an utterly fascinating and instructive, enlightening read.
Lemana
"Memo from David O. Selznick" is a terrific look at Hollywood the way it was, run by the great moguls. One was David O. Selznick, a man who really knew how to make films. He didn't want "Gone with the Wind" to be on his tombstone, but as hard as he tried, he never did beat it.

The various memos of how Gone with the Wind came about are especially interesting. "We have the perfect cast," he writes. "Ten years ago." Also, we're in on his first sighting of Jennifer Jones, whom he mistakenly believed was Phyllis Thaxter. For Selznick, it was truly love at first sight.

Humorous and fast-paced, these memos give a good picture of the man and his methods. It's a wild ride, but you won't be sorry you jumped on.
Lemana
"Memo from David O. Selznick" is a terrific look at Hollywood the way it was, run by the great moguls. One was David O. Selznick, a man who really knew how to make films. He didn't want "Gone with the Wind" to be on his tombstone, but as hard as he tried, he never did beat it.

The various memos of how Gone with the Wind came about are especially interesting. "We have the perfect cast," he writes. "Ten years ago." Also, we're in on his first sighting of Jennifer Jones, whom he mistakenly believed was Phyllis Thaxter. For Selznick, it was truly love at first sight.

Humorous and fast-paced, these memos give a good picture of the man and his methods. It's a wild ride, but you won't be sorry you jumped on.