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The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems epub download

by Paul Legault


The Emily Dickinson Reader book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Emily Dickinson Reader book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

If Emily Dickinson had a Tumblr, these witty one-liners are what she'd be posting. Paul Legault has attempted either a herculean or foolish task-depending on your point of view-of reducing all 1,789 poems of the great Emily Dickinson to a sentence or two. You'll want to not only display this one on your coffee table, but also read it from start to finish.

The Emily Dickinson Reader is Legault’s third book in as many years and his first composed exclusively of translations. His debut The Madeleine Poems received the Omnidawn Poetry Prize in 2009 for its series of invocations of the figure Madeleine in her various guises (poems include Madeleine as Travelogue, Madeleine as Matador, and Madeleine as Forest Gospel ). His second book The Other Poems earned distinct praise from Marjorie Perloff, who describes the collection as seventy-five taut and dazzling sonnets that break genuinely new ground for the lyric

Автор: Legault Paul Название: The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-To-English Translation . If bestselling books are advising us to not think, LeGault argues, it comes as no surprise that sharp, incisive reasoning has become a lost art in the daily life of people everywhere.

If bestselling books are advising us to not think, LeGault argues, it comes as no surprise that sharp, incisive reasoning has become a lost art in the daily life of people everywhere.

In 2012, he released terse English-to-English translations of Emily Dickinson's poetry. The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-to-English Translation of the Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (McSweeney's, 2012). From 2013 to 2015, he lived in St. Louis, Missouri, serving as a writer-in-residence at Washington University in St. Louis. Currently, he lives in New York City. The Other Poems (Fence, 2011). The Madeleine Poems (Omnidawn, 2010).

Emily-Dickinson- English to English Translation. Emily Dickinson Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. With the possible exception of Walt Whitman, Dickinson is now recognized as the most important American poet of the century

Emily-Dickinson- English to English Translation. Could become some kind of syntax/tone project. Emily Dickinson - Il cielo è basso. With the possible exception of Walt Whitman, Dickinson is now recognized as the most important American poet of the century. EMILY ELIZABETH DICKINSON til Was a poet with an exceptional ability to distill amazing sense from ordinary meanings.

Paul Legault,The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems, McSweeney's. Philip Levine, Sweet Will, Prairie Lights Books. Kimberly Lyons, The Practice of Residue, Subpress. Adrian Matejka -The Big Smoke, Penguin Books USA. Mary Meriam, Word Hot, Headmistress Press. W. S. Merwin, Selected Translations, Copper Canyon Press.

Paul Legault was born in Ontario and raised in Tennessee. He is the author of two books of poetry, The Madeleine Poems (Omnidawn, 2010) and The Other Poems (Fence Books, 2011). in Creative Writing from the University of Virginia and a . in Screenwriting from the University of Southern California. Country of Publication.

Paul Legault translated Emily Dickinson's poems into what he calls "basic English," but .

Paul Legault translated Emily Dickinson's poems into what he calls "basic English," but I'd classify them as concise snippets of 21st century American poetry. That's what Legault does. He recreates 1,789 poems by Emily Dickinson. And by doing so, he writes 1,789 poems by Paul Legault.

Readers familiar with Dickinson’s publication history will notice that the image on the cover of Legault’s book is the same image of. .An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson’s Complete Poems. Published 2012-08-14 00:00:00 McSweeney’s 248 Pages.

But upon closer inspection, Legault’s book doctors the image, inserting the arm of a skeleton that is reaching out of the grassy ground on which the Indian Pipes have long resided.

Perfect for the poetry fan who is short on time, The Emily Dickinson Reader offers Paul Legault’s ingenious and madcap one-line renderings of each of Dickinson’s 1,789 poems. Take that familiar chestnut, #314, a la Legault: “Hope is kind of like birds. In that I don’t have any.” Or the classic hymn, #615: “God likes to watch.”As Dickinson herself said in #769 (basically, via our translator): “This dead person used to be a person!”—and The Emily Dickinson Reader is here to tell you what that person meant.

The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems epub download

ISBN13: 978-1936365982

ISBN: 1936365987

Author: Paul Legault

Category: Entertainment

Subcategory: Humor

Language: English

Publisher: McSweeney's (August 14, 2012)

Pages: 248 pages

ePUB size: 1295 kb

FB2 size: 1301 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 933

Other Formats: mbr doc docx lrf

Related to The Emily Dickinson Reader: An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems ePub books

Ferne
Paul Legault has attempted either a herculean or foolish task—depending on your point of view—of reducing all 1,789 poems of the great Emily Dickinson to a sentence or two. (Of course most of her poems are around eight lines anyway so it’s not as if he were trying to reduce Tennyson’s “In Memoriam” to one sentence.)

I looked up what Mr. Legault calls translations of three of my favorite Dickinson poems and have written the first stanzas of each of them and the author’s words as well. Anyone who reads my little review can draw his/her own conclusion.

The Bustle in a House
The Morning after Death
Is solemnest of industries
Enacted upon Earth –

(I hate cleaning. Especially right after someone I love just died.)

I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you – Nobody – too!
Then there’s a pair of us!
Don’t tell! They’d advertise – you know!

(I’m so insignificant that I don’t even exist. I’m so insignificant that I don’t even want to exist. I don’t even want people to know that I don’t exist. The way frogs exist. And no one cares about them. The way they’re arrogant the way they exist. I hate frogs.)

If you were coming in the Fall,
I’d brush the summer by
With half a smile, and half a spurn
As House wives do, a fly

(Dear Sir, Sometimes I miss you. Let me know if you’re going to visit me so I know whether I should kill myself or not.)

Mr. Legault also intersperses the same portrait of Miss Dickinson (I would never address her as Ms.) that we all recognize throughout the book with different captions. Here is one of them: “Dickinson, simultaneously aroused and disgusted by the thought of sex.” I rest my case.

A word about the book’s appearance: it is very attractive with gold-edged pages and a cloth bookmark. And the author should get credit for reading all of Miss Dickinson’s poetry—what a delight that must have been. I’m sticking, however, with the original poetry.
Ferne
Paul Legault has attempted either a herculean or foolish task—depending on your point of view—of reducing all 1,789 poems of the great Emily Dickinson to a sentence or two. (Of course most of her poems are around eight lines anyway so it’s not as if he were trying to reduce Tennyson’s “In Memoriam” to one sentence.)

I looked up what Mr. Legault calls translations of three of my favorite Dickinson poems and have written the first stanzas of each of them and the author’s words as well. Anyone who reads my little review can draw his/her own conclusion.

The Bustle in a House
The Morning after Death
Is solemnest of industries
Enacted upon Earth –

(I hate cleaning. Especially right after someone I love just died.)

I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you – Nobody – too!
Then there’s a pair of us!
Don’t tell! They’d advertise – you know!

(I’m so insignificant that I don’t even exist. I’m so insignificant that I don’t even want to exist. I don’t even want people to know that I don’t exist. The way frogs exist. And no one cares about them. The way they’re arrogant the way they exist. I hate frogs.)

If you were coming in the Fall,
I’d brush the summer by
With half a smile, and half a spurn
As House wives do, a fly

(Dear Sir, Sometimes I miss you. Let me know if you’re going to visit me so I know whether I should kill myself or not.)

Mr. Legault also intersperses the same portrait of Miss Dickinson (I would never address her as Ms.) that we all recognize throughout the book with different captions. Here is one of them: “Dickinson, simultaneously aroused and disgusted by the thought of sex.” I rest my case.

A word about the book’s appearance: it is very attractive with gold-edged pages and a cloth bookmark. And the author should get credit for reading all of Miss Dickinson’s poetry—what a delight that must have been. I’m sticking, however, with the original poetry.
Eayaroler
This has nothing to do with Emily Dickinson. It is someone's sick and loose interpretation of her works.
Eayaroler
This has nothing to do with Emily Dickinson. It is someone's sick and loose interpretation of her works.
Hucama
Occasional misfires in the extreme, when Legault's aim is to "interpret" Emily Dickinson's poems. But, I'm glad I bought this book. Yay! for the author for treading, treading into Dickinson territory because the inviolable is the best material for humor.
Hucama
Occasional misfires in the extreme, when Legault's aim is to "interpret" Emily Dickinson's poems. But, I'm glad I bought this book. Yay! for the author for treading, treading into Dickinson territory because the inviolable is the best material for humor.
Madi
I really enjoyed reading this along side of Dickinson's poems...anyone who enjoys her poems will enjoy this book...just a fun read.
Madi
I really enjoyed reading this along side of Dickinson's poems...anyone who enjoys her poems will enjoy this book...just a fun read.
Nafyn
This collection fails in so many ways, it doesn't merit review at all. If it weren't for the fact that it might mislead people into purchasing it, I wouldn't have bothered.

To say, as the subtitle suggests, that it is "An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems" could hardly be further from the truth. Most of the one to two line quips (and to call them that is a stretch) have only a faint reference to something in the original but by no means capture anything of substance from the Dickinson poem.

The back cover states "Everything is still there -- flowers, New England, God, Bobolinks, the high mortality rate of the nineteenth century, sexual obsession -- though written out in 'plain speech' ...". Really. What the author doesn't state is that there is very little of those things. What there is in abundance [and somehow I missed those in the original Emily Dickinson poems] are over 100 references to Big Foot, robots, Sigmund Freud, wizards, time machines, and zombies. There are 75 zombie "poems" alone. Is this the author's "attempt to rewrite her poems (with their foreign beauty intact) in 'Standard English.'"?

The book is in fact not an "Emily Dickinson Reader" but, as one reviewer stated, a "vanity project" -- and a juvenile one at that. Legault is not Emily Dickinson's "humble translator" but rather an egocentric amateur.

I would have far less criticism if the author were more honest. If the collection had been presented as a spoof on Emily Dickinson's poems, fine. If he had promoted his own zombitic twist to her poetry, I would have had different expectations. Even so, as another reviewer stated: "This is a joke that would be funny once, maybe twice, but stretching it out into an entire book is kind of overkill..."

Though the author seems to have a working knowledge of Emily Dickinson, it doesn't appear as though he gave her poems a very careful read. In fact, the entire collection appears to have been whipped out in a matter of days.

For some people Emily Dickinson is sacred and her poems should not be touched. I do not fall into that camp. Many people are a bit intimidated by her poetry. The language certainly can do that alone, but the complexity and bold experimentation -- the sheer genius of her poetry can challenge even the most devoted student. Any attempt to simplify an Emily Dickinson poem will lose something, yet if it remains inaccessible even more may be lost.

If Legault sincerely wished to provide an "English version of what she meant." he should have tried harder, much harder. A book that comes closer to that end is haiku Emily! (2011) by Everett Decker.haiku Emily! At least there, some attempt is made at preserving something of the original while making it more accessible. A comparison of the three will illustrate my point:
[Franklin numbering used]

FR10
Garlands for Queens, may be -
Laurels - for rare degree
Of soul or sword -
Ah - but remembering me -
Ah - but remembering thee -
Nature in chivalry -
Nature in charity -
Nature in equity -
The Rose ordained!

hE! 0010
the laurel's for distinguished few
and garland's for the Queen
the rest will have to just make do
with roses shared between

TEDR10
I could probably only be queen in a completely
imaginary state. Otherwise, I don't think the country would
do so well culturally or economically, because I would
probably appoint plants, specifically roses, into key political
and religious offices.

FR86
For every Bird a Nest --
Wherefore in timid quest
Some little Wren goes seeking round --

Wherefore when boughs are free --
Households in every tree --
Pilgrim be found?

Perhaps a home too high --
Ah Aristocracy!
The little Wren desires --

Perhaps of twig so fine --
Of twine e'en superfine,
Her pride aspires --

The Lark is not ashamed
To build upon the ground
Her modest house --

Yet who of all the throng
Dancing around the sun
Does so rejoice?

hE! 0086
the wren must have the finest nest
the lark a modest home is best
and though the latter makes less lofty choices
every morning she rejoices

TEDR86
We should behave more like birds.
Chirp. Chirp, chirp.

FR160
To hang our head -- ostensibly --
And subsequent, to find
That such was not the posture
Of our immortal mind --

Affords the sly presumption
That in so dense a fuzz --
You -- too -- take Cobweb attitudes
Upon a plane of Gauze!

hE! 0160
not for praying
we both hang our heads
but for lying

TEDR160
Don't look so glum. People might think you're pessimistic.

FR193
"Speech" -- is a prank of Parliament --
"Tears" -- is a trick of the nerve --
But the Heart with the heaviest freight on --
Doesn't -- always -- move --

hE! 0193
ears deceived by what they hear
eyes by what they see
the heart with all that extra weight
not moved so easily

TEDR193
Sometimes when I am sad I stay completely still.

FR505
They have a little Odor -- that to me
Is metre -- nay -- 'tis melody --
And spiciest at fading -- indicate --
A Habit -- of a Laureate --

hE! 0505
they have a heartbeat
to me is rhythm -- no is poetry
strongest just before you fall
into the space they leave

TEDR505
These flowers smell like a metaphor for something.

FR566
But little Carmine hath her face --
Of Emerald scant -- her Gown --
Her Beauty -- is the love she doth --
Itself -- exhibit -- Mine --

hE! 0566
not her makeup
that makes her beautiful
but her makeup

TEDR566
My friend Carmine has a beautiful green face.

FR609
A Night -- there lay the Days between --
The Day that was Before --
And Day that was Behind -- were one --
And now -- 'twas Night -- was here --

Slow -- Night -- that must be watched away --
As Grains upon a shore --
Too imperceptible to note --
Till it be night -- no more --

hE! 0609
Night --
the long stretches between
when it's not

TEDR609
It is hard to distinguish night from day at the moment
of their intersection.

FR1402
His Heart was darker than the starless night
For that there is a morn
But in this black Receptacle
Can be no Bode of Dawn

hE! 1402
the deepest hurt will see a dawn
the shallowest grave - none

TEDR1402
Zombies are usually pretty emo.

The only part I found truly humorous was the cover.

As far as the rest of it, as another reviewer commented: "It has been a few years since Legault's last collection. He still has nothing to say."
Nafyn
This collection fails in so many ways, it doesn't merit review at all. If it weren't for the fact that it might mislead people into purchasing it, I wouldn't have bothered.

To say, as the subtitle suggests, that it is "An English-to-English Translation of Emily Dickinson's Complete Poems" could hardly be further from the truth. Most of the one to two line quips (and to call them that is a stretch) have only a faint reference to something in the original but by no means capture anything of substance from the Dickinson poem.

The back cover states "Everything is still there -- flowers, New England, God, Bobolinks, the high mortality rate of the nineteenth century, sexual obsession -- though written out in 'plain speech' ...". Really. What the author doesn't state is that there is very little of those things. What there is in abundance [and somehow I missed those in the original Emily Dickinson poems] are over 100 references to Big Foot, robots, Sigmund Freud, wizards, time machines, and zombies. There are 75 zombie "poems" alone. Is this the author's "attempt to rewrite her poems (with their foreign beauty intact) in 'Standard English.'"?

The book is in fact not an "Emily Dickinson Reader" but, as one reviewer stated, a "vanity project" -- and a juvenile one at that. Legault is not Emily Dickinson's "humble translator" but rather an egocentric amateur.

I would have far less criticism if the author were more honest. If the collection had been presented as a spoof on Emily Dickinson's poems, fine. If he had promoted his own zombitic twist to her poetry, I would have had different expectations. Even so, as another reviewer stated: "This is a joke that would be funny once, maybe twice, but stretching it out into an entire book is kind of overkill..."

Though the author seems to have a working knowledge of Emily Dickinson, it doesn't appear as though he gave her poems a very careful read. In fact, the entire collection appears to have been whipped out in a matter of days.

For some people Emily Dickinson is sacred and her poems should not be touched. I do not fall into that camp. Many people are a bit intimidated by her poetry. The language certainly can do that alone, but the complexity and bold experimentation -- the sheer genius of her poetry can challenge even the most devoted student. Any attempt to simplify an Emily Dickinson poem will lose something, yet if it remains inaccessible even more may be lost.

If Legault sincerely wished to provide an "English version of what she meant." he should have tried harder, much harder. A book that comes closer to that end is haiku Emily! (2011) by Everett Decker.haiku Emily! At least there, some attempt is made at preserving something of the original while making it more accessible. A comparison of the three will illustrate my point:
[Franklin numbering used]

FR10
Garlands for Queens, may be -
Laurels - for rare degree
Of soul or sword -
Ah - but remembering me -
Ah - but remembering thee -
Nature in chivalry -
Nature in charity -
Nature in equity -
The Rose ordained!

hE! 0010
the laurel's for distinguished few
and garland's for the Queen
the rest will have to just make do
with roses shared between

TEDR10
I could probably only be queen in a completely
imaginary state. Otherwise, I don't think the country would
do so well culturally or economically, because I would
probably appoint plants, specifically roses, into key political
and religious offices.

FR86
For every Bird a Nest --
Wherefore in timid quest
Some little Wren goes seeking round --

Wherefore when boughs are free --
Households in every tree --
Pilgrim be found?

Perhaps a home too high --
Ah Aristocracy!
The little Wren desires --

Perhaps of twig so fine --
Of twine e'en superfine,
Her pride aspires --

The Lark is not ashamed
To build upon the ground
Her modest house --

Yet who of all the throng
Dancing around the sun
Does so rejoice?

hE! 0086
the wren must have the finest nest
the lark a modest home is best
and though the latter makes less lofty choices
every morning she rejoices

TEDR86
We should behave more like birds.
Chirp. Chirp, chirp.

FR160
To hang our head -- ostensibly --
And subsequent, to find
That such was not the posture
Of our immortal mind --

Affords the sly presumption
That in so dense a fuzz --
You -- too -- take Cobweb attitudes
Upon a plane of Gauze!

hE! 0160
not for praying
we both hang our heads
but for lying

TEDR160
Don't look so glum. People might think you're pessimistic.

FR193
"Speech" -- is a prank of Parliament --
"Tears" -- is a trick of the nerve --
But the Heart with the heaviest freight on --
Doesn't -- always -- move --

hE! 0193
ears deceived by what they hear
eyes by what they see
the heart with all that extra weight
not moved so easily

TEDR193
Sometimes when I am sad I stay completely still.

FR505
They have a little Odor -- that to me
Is metre -- nay -- 'tis melody --
And spiciest at fading -- indicate --
A Habit -- of a Laureate --

hE! 0505
they have a heartbeat
to me is rhythm -- no is poetry
strongest just before you fall
into the space they leave

TEDR505
These flowers smell like a metaphor for something.

FR566
But little Carmine hath her face --
Of Emerald scant -- her Gown --
Her Beauty -- is the love she doth --
Itself -- exhibit -- Mine --

hE! 0566
not her makeup
that makes her beautiful
but her makeup

TEDR566
My friend Carmine has a beautiful green face.

FR609
A Night -- there lay the Days between --
The Day that was Before --
And Day that was Behind -- were one --
And now -- 'twas Night -- was here --

Slow -- Night -- that must be watched away --
As Grains upon a shore --
Too imperceptible to note --
Till it be night -- no more --

hE! 0609
Night --
the long stretches between
when it's not

TEDR609
It is hard to distinguish night from day at the moment
of their intersection.

FR1402
His Heart was darker than the starless night
For that there is a morn
But in this black Receptacle
Can be no Bode of Dawn

hE! 1402
the deepest hurt will see a dawn
the shallowest grave - none

TEDR1402
Zombies are usually pretty emo.

The only part I found truly humorous was the cover.

As far as the rest of it, as another reviewer commented: "It has been a few years since Legault's last collection. He still has nothing to say."