» » The Joy of Keeping Horses: The Ultimate Guide to Keeping Horses on Your Property (The Joy of Series)

The Joy of Keeping Horses: The Ultimate Guide to Keeping Horses on Your Property (The Joy of Series) epub download

by Jessie Shiers


Jessie Shiers lays The Joy of Keeping Horses is a celebration of how to best keep happy and healthy horses at home.

Jessie Shiers lays The Joy of Keeping Horses is a celebration of how to best keep happy and healthy horses at home. With an emphasis on the differences between owning a horse at a boarding stable and keeping that same horse at your own small farm, this beautiful, clear guide is written specifically for horse lovers who are considering taking the plunge into farm ownership. Jessie Shiers lays out all the important facts and information, from purchasing property and building facilities to daily grooming and nutritional needs.

Jessie Shiers lays out all the important facts and information, from purchasing property and building facilities to daily grooming and nutritional needs. Shiers also dispels some common myths and misconceptions about horses, and answers questions the novice owner may not know to ask. Download from free file storage.

Horse Riding Sports Paperback Books. Horse Racing Horse and Hound Magazines in English. Horses Paperback Books. Horse Riding Paperback Books. Additional site navigation.

Watching horse racing at the higher levels of the sport is a wonderful experience. Watch the horse in the paddock. I’m really not much for any other forms of gambling, and personally don’t see the fun in losing my shorts in some dark, smoky casino. But horse racing I like; it feels like entertainment, an experience, an outing. Before every race, the horses are paraded around in an area of the track called the paddock. It gives you a chance to see how the horse looks and is behaving before the race starts.

The Joy of Keeping Chicke. has been added to your Cart. This book covers the basics of chicken keeping, getting started, housing, feeding, keeping chickens for eggs, keeping chickens for meat, using the eggs, showing chickens and it touches very briefly on a few of the most common chicken ailments and diseases. It was very thorough. It also had lots of information on the behavior & habits of the top predators of chickens and how to protect against attacks.

Experience the sheer joy of being one with your horse and one with nature

Equestrian Style, Horse Girl, Horse Training, Book Crafts, Book Nooks, Books Online, Tack Trunk, Horse Books, Horse Stuff. Experience the sheer joy of being one with your horse and one with nature.

SLIDESHOW: Small Horse-Property Tour Are you hoping to keep horses on small acreage? Or perhaps you’d like to. .

SLIDESHOW: Small Horse-Property Tour Are you hoping to keep horses on small acreage? Or perhaps you’d like to make improvements to your current set up? Take a look at this 2-acre farm designed by architect and owner Carolyn Adams for ideas on how to make the most of your space. The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care is a monthly equine publication providing the latest news and information on the health, care, welfare, and management of all equids. Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with. FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.

Read "Horse Housekeeping Everything You Need to Know to Keep a Horse at Home" by Margaret Korda . The Joy of Keeping Horses. Special Needs Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding.

In Horse Housekeeping, Margaret and Michael Korda (she is a successful novice- and training-level eventer and he is the.

Joy of Keeping Horses : The Ultimate Guide to Keeping Horses on Your Property .

The Joy of Keeping Horses : The Ultimate Guide to Keeping Horses on Your Property. The Joy of Keeping Horses is a celebration of how to best keep happy and healthy horses at home.

Keeping a horse warm. Jon Nauman, long-time owner of Horse Drawn Carriage Company in Chugiak, has 11 horses on his property this winter: Six belong to boarders, five to him. Nauman and his draft horses are a familiar sight in downtown Anchorage, where he gives carriage rides. One thing people usually notice about his all black Percheron horses: They're huge.

The Joy of Keeping Horses is a celebration of how to best keep happy and healthy horses at home. With an emphasis on the differences between owning a horse at a boarding stable and keeping that same horse at your own small farm, this beautiful, clear guide is written specifically for horse lovers who are considering taking the plunge into farm ownership. 

Jessie Shiers lays out all the important facts and information, from purchasing property and building facilities to daily grooming and nutritional needs. Shiers also dispels some common myths and misconceptions about horses, and answers questions the novice owner may not know to ask. Along the way, she shares anecdotes from her own experiences and from interviews with other horse owners that demonstrate the main reason people choose to keep horses: the joy they bring to the lives of their owners.

The Joy of Keeping Horses: The Ultimate Guide to Keeping Horses on Your Property (The Joy of Series) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1616084240

ISBN: 1616084243

Author: Jessie Shiers

Category: Crafts and Hobbies

Subcategory: Pets & Animal Care

Language: English

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing; 1 edition (August 14, 2012)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1948 kb

FB2 size: 1550 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 792

Other Formats: lrf mobi mbr docx

Related to The Joy of Keeping Horses: The Ultimate Guide to Keeping Horses on Your Property (The Joy of Series) ePub books

digytal soul
Full of updated horse care information that other books don't cover. I love it! Thanks!
digytal soul
Full of updated horse care information that other books don't cover. I love it! Thanks!
Dawncrusher
This is a wonderful new book. It is the one book I would give someone who is thinking about buying property to keep a horse. I wish I had read it before I bought property and acquired horses.

Divided roughly into thirds, the book covers facilities, buying a horse, and horse care. It touches briefly on a host of details, and while many of them deserve books of their own, at least the reader begins to gain awareness of the scope of the undertaking. And while brief, the treatment of the various issues is authoritative, practical, and thoroughly up to date.

The author rightly states that horses are happiest and healthiest when they live outside, in the company of other horses, eating mainly grass. Then she describes the cost and effort required to provide that kind of environment. A prospective horse owner might dream of beautiful three-rail wooden fences, but after learning the price could be $10,000 per acre, the reader might consider a safe, well made electric fence at a tenth the cost.

I laughed when the author, after listing the benefits of horses living outside, admits that she puts her horses in stalls in extreme weather because it makes her feel better. I cringed when she explained the importance of regular pasture mowing, as well as dragging the pasture to break up manure -- two jobs best done with a tractor. Others are fertilizing, liming, seeding, and cleaning up winter manure, along with moving round bales. I never figured the cost of a tractor into my horse ownership. As a result my first pasture degenerated into a weedy mess after ten years.

On choosing a horse, Shiers tells of breeds and various equine activities, and which ones go together. She stresses the importance of temperament, soundness, and conformation in that order. She stresses the false economy of buying a young horse to save money, because training costs will more than eat up the savings. She wisely suggests that a horse over 16 years old is the best choice for young and beginning riders.

Dealing with care, in the last third of the book, the author includes a great list of top ten equine emergencies, along with more detailed information on how to prevent them. She points out that "every time you ride or handle your horse, you are training him. He is learning either to respect you or not."

Shiers talks about four professionals as though you already know them: your riding instructor, your trainer, your farrier, and your veterinarian. You will be lucky if you live some place where you have much choice of equine vets, but at least you have some assurance they are qualified for their work. Anybody can pass herself off as a riding instructor, trainer or farrier, and good ones are excruciatingly difficult to find. I think she could have provided a little more guidance there.

I reacted most negatively to the author's dismissal of the natural horsemanship movement as "one of several famous clinicians -- charismatic characters who travel the country promoting their individual systems, while trying to sell tickets, DVDs, and overpriced training equipment along the way." This is a profoundly ignorant statement and betrays the condescension common to Easterners with long association with classic equitation. Funny thing, we have things like the intertubes and ebay and we are able to comparison shop in ways that were unthinkable 20 years ago. I still regularly use one lead rope that I fashioned from bulk rope from a discount farm supply store, but I have another lead rope, two rope halters, and a training stick that I absolutely could not match for quality or function with anything cheaper, and I spent ten years trying. I went from being terrified of my horse to being able to ride him through town bareback thanks to one of those "charismatic characters." The dismissal of natural horsemanship is beneath the author.

In spite of that the book really is a terrific summary of what is involved in choosing a horse, a place to keep it, and how to care for both. 252 pages of solid information is a real bargain at the price.
Dawncrusher
This is a wonderful new book. It is the one book I would give someone who is thinking about buying property to keep a horse. I wish I had read it before I bought property and acquired horses.

Divided roughly into thirds, the book covers facilities, buying a horse, and horse care. It touches briefly on a host of details, and while many of them deserve books of their own, at least the reader begins to gain awareness of the scope of the undertaking. And while brief, the treatment of the various issues is authoritative, practical, and thoroughly up to date.

The author rightly states that horses are happiest and healthiest when they live outside, in the company of other horses, eating mainly grass. Then she describes the cost and effort required to provide that kind of environment. A prospective horse owner might dream of beautiful three-rail wooden fences, but after learning the price could be $10,000 per acre, the reader might consider a safe, well made electric fence at a tenth the cost.

I laughed when the author, after listing the benefits of horses living outside, admits that she puts her horses in stalls in extreme weather because it makes her feel better. I cringed when she explained the importance of regular pasture mowing, as well as dragging the pasture to break up manure -- two jobs best done with a tractor. Others are fertilizing, liming, seeding, and cleaning up winter manure, along with moving round bales. I never figured the cost of a tractor into my horse ownership. As a result my first pasture degenerated into a weedy mess after ten years.

On choosing a horse, Shiers tells of breeds and various equine activities, and which ones go together. She stresses the importance of temperament, soundness, and conformation in that order. She stresses the false economy of buying a young horse to save money, because training costs will more than eat up the savings. She wisely suggests that a horse over 16 years old is the best choice for young and beginning riders.

Dealing with care, in the last third of the book, the author includes a great list of top ten equine emergencies, along with more detailed information on how to prevent them. She points out that "every time you ride or handle your horse, you are training him. He is learning either to respect you or not."

Shiers talks about four professionals as though you already know them: your riding instructor, your trainer, your farrier, and your veterinarian. You will be lucky if you live some place where you have much choice of equine vets, but at least you have some assurance they are qualified for their work. Anybody can pass herself off as a riding instructor, trainer or farrier, and good ones are excruciatingly difficult to find. I think she could have provided a little more guidance there.

I reacted most negatively to the author's dismissal of the natural horsemanship movement as "one of several famous clinicians -- charismatic characters who travel the country promoting their individual systems, while trying to sell tickets, DVDs, and overpriced training equipment along the way." This is a profoundly ignorant statement and betrays the condescension common to Easterners with long association with classic equitation. Funny thing, we have things like the intertubes and ebay and we are able to comparison shop in ways that were unthinkable 20 years ago. I still regularly use one lead rope that I fashioned from bulk rope from a discount farm supply store, but I have another lead rope, two rope halters, and a training stick that I absolutely could not match for quality or function with anything cheaper, and I spent ten years trying. I went from being terrified of my horse to being able to ride him through town bareback thanks to one of those "charismatic characters." The dismissal of natural horsemanship is beneath the author.

In spite of that the book really is a terrific summary of what is involved in choosing a horse, a place to keep it, and how to care for both. 252 pages of solid information is a real bargain at the price.