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The Woven Coverlets of Norway epub download

by Katherine Larson


Coverlets were a central feature in the important ceremonies o The Woven Coverlets of Norway showcases one .

Coverlets were a central feature in the important ceremonies o The Woven Coverlets of Norway showcases one of Norway's most beautiful and enduring folk arts. A warm, thick cover has always been important during Norway's long winter nights, but coverlets also decorated the family bedsteads in one-room farmhouses, affording housewives an opportunity to display their talents. To explain the coverlet's importance as the pinnacle of the Norwegian weaver's art, Katherine Larson looks at the role textiles played in the lives of women prior to the twentieth century.

Her book will appeal to anyone who owns or has ever admired an antique coverlet, and especially to Scandinavians who are interested in their cultural heritage. The historical aspects of her work will be important to textile studies, women's studies, and art history. She lives in Seattle.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780295981307. Release Date:September 2001.

The Woven Coverlets of Norway by Katherine Larson (2003, Paperback). A Book of Hand-Woven Coverlets by Eliza Calvert Hall 1922 Hardcover Illustrated. Customs services and international tracking provided. Lot of 2 Vintage Handmade Dollhouse Coverlets for Beds. American Quilts and Coverlets in the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Peck, Amelia.

Home Katherine Larson The Woven Coverlets of Norway. It traces the centuries-old traditions of the Norwegian coverlet: decorative textiles that are both utilitarian and symbolic, used in ceremonies from christenings to funerals as well as in everyday living

Home Katherine Larson The Woven Coverlets of Norway. The Woven Coverlets of Norway. It traces the centuries-old traditions of the Norwegian coverlet: decorative textiles that are both utilitarian and symbolic, used in ceremonies from christenings to funerals as well as in everyday living. The many beautiful illustrations (both b&w and color) include images of coverlets as well as weavers and the places where they worked.

Developing a Book Art Genre Headings Index. Dyer et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637. The University of Chicago Press Books. Chicago Distribution Center. The University of Chicago.

The Woven Coverlets of Norway. Contents: Part I. Weaving as a Part of Norwegian Folk Life The Yearly Cycle of Textile Production Of Spinning Wheels and Looms Part II. The Coverlets More Than Just a Cover for the Bed Tapestr. More).

Find Katherine Larson's contact information, age, background check, white pages, criminal records, photos, relatives, social networks & resume. The Woven Coverlets Of Norway - ISBNdb (books and publications). author: Katherine Larson. Let's Do Some Cooking - ISBNdb (books and publications). author: Katherine A. Larson.

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Coverlets were woven in almost every community in the United States from the colonial era until the late 19th century. Coverlets of 18th century America were twill-woven with a linen warp and woolen weft. The wool was most often dyed a dark blue from indigo, but madder red, walnut brown, and a lighter "Williamsburg blue" were also used.

This book about weaving techniques, patterns, tools, and materials is also about emigration and cultural heritage. It traces the centuries-old traditions of the Norwegian coverlet: decorative textiles that are both utilitarian and symbolic, used in ceremonies from christenings to funerals as well as in everyday living. Larson (a weaver and researcher based in Seattle) works in colorful bits and pieces about her own Norwegian American background as she describes the steps of cloth production. The many beautiful illustrations (both b&w and color) include images of coverlets as well as weavers and the places where they worked. Oversize: 9x11.25. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Woven Coverlets of Norway epub download

ISBN13: 978-0295981314

ISBN: 0295981318

Author: Katherine Larson

Category: Crafts and Hobbies

Subcategory: Crafts & Hobbies

Language: English

Publisher: Univ of Washington Pr; 1st Edition edition (October 1, 2001)

Pages: 191 pages

ePUB size: 1412 kb

FB2 size: 1765 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 698

Other Formats: lrf docx doc mbr

Related to The Woven Coverlets of Norway ePub books

Quellik
This book was selected to receive the R.L.Shep Ethnic Textiles Book Award for 2001. The Award is presented annually by the Textile Society of America (TSA) to a publication judged the best book of the year in this field. The purpose of the Award is to encourage the study and understanding of textile traditions by recognizing and rewarding an exceptional study that fosters appreciation for the field of ethnic textiles.
Quellik
This book was selected to receive the R.L.Shep Ethnic Textiles Book Award for 2001. The Award is presented annually by the Textile Society of America (TSA) to a publication judged the best book of the year in this field. The purpose of the Award is to encourage the study and understanding of textile traditions by recognizing and rewarding an exceptional study that fosters appreciation for the field of ethnic textiles.
Qudanilyr
one of the most thorough literary writings on the process of the "antique" hand manufacture of fiber art for the useful and extraordinary articles of any civilization.. this is colorful, exact,. correct and and absolutely ... beautiful... even if you don't care anything about weaving. Amazing and well worth taking a very long look!
Qudanilyr
one of the most thorough literary writings on the process of the "antique" hand manufacture of fiber art for the useful and extraordinary articles of any civilization.. this is colorful, exact,. correct and and absolutely ... beautiful... even if you don't care anything about weaving. Amazing and well worth taking a very long look!
Landaron
I' ve met the author who weaves coverlets (called okla or akla In Norwegian) and shows her work . Besides the many color photos of museum quality okla to inspire the general reader, there are many technical descriptions of weaving, looms and how your precious baptismal or wedding skilbraegd got to be that way.
Landaron
I' ve met the author who weaves coverlets (called okla or akla In Norwegian) and shows her work . Besides the many color photos of museum quality okla to inspire the general reader, there are many technical descriptions of weaving, looms and how your precious baptismal or wedding skilbraegd got to be that way.
SadLendy
The book was in pristine condition. Writing is excellent and photography is great with many close ups of textiles.
SadLendy
The book was in pristine condition. Writing is excellent and photography is great with many close ups of textiles.
Enalonasa
there are many publications about american coverlets, this one attracted me because it concerns coverlets from another weaving tradition.

another reviewer has done a first rate job of detailing many of the books historical strengths. i am adding my review to include the patterns and designs.

this is not, as the other reviewer noted, an instruction manual. but it is a superb design resource, for many other fiber arts as well as weaving.

the photos are fantastic. the examples are inspiring--i'm mentally designing a color pattern sweater from one coverlet, and several beaded pr jects from others. some coverlet designs would translate very easily into several kinds of embroidery.

the author notes the similarities in design among scandanavian, russion, other european and mid-eastern weavings. what i found interesting is the similarities between some of the coverlets and american patchwork quilts. all crafts borrowed freely from one another--lace patterns were made into embroidery, and vice versa, weaving patterns were used in knitting, etc., so finding simialr elements is common. but the designs of several coverlets in this selection could pass for patchwork in their arrangement. since morwegian settlers are credited wtih introding the log cabin to american in the colonial era, i wonder is they also influenced the design of 18th and 19th century quilts.

this is a wonderful book, that would be of use and interest to norwegians and non-norwegians, anyone who designs for any textile craft, and the general reader who is interested in how our forbears lived.

i can only hope that another edition will be brought out.
Enalonasa
there are many publications about american coverlets, this one attracted me because it concerns coverlets from another weaving tradition.

another reviewer has done a first rate job of detailing many of the books historical strengths. i am adding my review to include the patterns and designs.

this is not, as the other reviewer noted, an instruction manual. but it is a superb design resource, for many other fiber arts as well as weaving.

the photos are fantastic. the examples are inspiring--i'm mentally designing a color pattern sweater from one coverlet, and several beaded pr jects from others. some coverlet designs would translate very easily into several kinds of embroidery.

the author notes the similarities in design among scandanavian, russion, other european and mid-eastern weavings. what i found interesting is the similarities between some of the coverlets and american patchwork quilts. all crafts borrowed freely from one another--lace patterns were made into embroidery, and vice versa, weaving patterns were used in knitting, etc., so finding simialr elements is common. but the designs of several coverlets in this selection could pass for patchwork in their arrangement. since morwegian settlers are credited wtih introding the log cabin to american in the colonial era, i wonder is they also influenced the design of 18th and 19th century quilts.

this is a wonderful book, that would be of use and interest to norwegians and non-norwegians, anyone who designs for any textile craft, and the general reader who is interested in how our forbears lived.

i can only hope that another edition will be brought out.
Worla
A Review in the December issue of the Norwegian-American newspaper, Døtre av Norge, a publication of the Daughters of Norway..
Let me begin by saying that Katherine Larson is a member of Nina Grieg Lodge #40 of the Daughters of Norway in Poulsbo, Washington.
Katherine worked with the Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle and the Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum, Decorah, Iowa, to develop a major exhibit on woven coverlets from major museums in Norway and the United States that was or will be shown as follows:
* Nordic Heritage Museum, Seattle, Washington, September 13-November 11, 2001;
* The Plains Art Museum, Fargo, North Dakota, May 16-July 14, 2002;
* West Vancouver Museum and Archives, West Vancouver, British Columbia, August-October, 2002.
The first forty pages of Katherine Larson's book are a cultural history of Norway using weaving and coverlets as a unifying theme. Katherine writes extensively and well about the isolation and self sufficiency of rural life in Norway. Although the precise dates that many techniques and technologies arrived in Norway from abroad are not typically known, she does try to frame such introductions in terms of centuries. More importantly, she discusses why weaving was so important to the development of the culture.
My favorite chapter in the first section of the book is titled, "More Than Just a Cover for the Bed," in which she describes the arrangement of farm households, the psychological boost from colorful additions during the long winter months and the cradle to grave use of coverlets, including baptisms and funerals.
Katherine uses historical photographs of women and their equipment; color prints from paintings in the National Gallery and line art of plants used for dying wool, of weaving techniques and of weaving patterns. She presents about 130 high-quality color photographs of finished coverlets, either flat so you can see the entire design or a close up section or in use on a bed. In addition there are many, many black and white photographs of more whole coverlets. Some of the detail drawings would also be useful for embroidery and knitting.
The later chapters of the book are devoted one each to the various types of Norwegian woven coverlets. Some of these are pan-Scandinavian and others even pan-European, but the essence always comes back to what Norwegian women had, wanted to have and were willing to create for their homes from roughly the middle ages to modern times.
Each valley or district in the country had a favorite technique and pattern for its coverlets, providing a rich visual texture to the book. The weaving styles and techniques covered include tapestry/billedvev, square-weave/rutevev, bound-weave/krokbragd, other weft-faced styles, knotted pile/rye, (reversible) double-weave/dobeltvev, and overshot/tavlebragd or skillbragd.

The appendices and closing words include a brief afterword about her family's immigration experience, a conversational and a literal table of equivalent of weaving terms among English, Norwegian and Swedish; notes; a glossary of textile terms in English; a bibliography; and a proper index.
This book is NOT a beginner's how-to. It is a highly readable cultural reference book about weaving. It would be a useful addition for anyone making hand-woven textiles, anyone who likes to apply older techniques in modern textile settings (not just weaving), and anyone interested in the cultural history of Norway and for Norwegian-Americans. In short almost everyone interested in Norway.
I was pleased to find my own family's two dominant weaving styles in the later chapters of the book: Danish weave, common in southeastern Norway, and overshot weave, mostly the Monk's Belt pattern. One of my maiden great, great aunts was a professional weaver and both my grandmother and aunt also wove.
Worla
A Review in the December issue of the Norwegian-American newspaper, Døtre av Norge, a publication of the Daughters of Norway..
Let me begin by saying that Katherine Larson is a member of Nina Grieg Lodge #40 of the Daughters of Norway in Poulsbo, Washington.
Katherine worked with the Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle and the Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum, Decorah, Iowa, to develop a major exhibit on woven coverlets from major museums in Norway and the United States that was or will be shown as follows:
* Nordic Heritage Museum, Seattle, Washington, September 13-November 11, 2001;
* The Plains Art Museum, Fargo, North Dakota, May 16-July 14, 2002;
* West Vancouver Museum and Archives, West Vancouver, British Columbia, August-October, 2002.
The first forty pages of Katherine Larson's book are a cultural history of Norway using weaving and coverlets as a unifying theme. Katherine writes extensively and well about the isolation and self sufficiency of rural life in Norway. Although the precise dates that many techniques and technologies arrived in Norway from abroad are not typically known, she does try to frame such introductions in terms of centuries. More importantly, she discusses why weaving was so important to the development of the culture.
My favorite chapter in the first section of the book is titled, "More Than Just a Cover for the Bed," in which she describes the arrangement of farm households, the psychological boost from colorful additions during the long winter months and the cradle to grave use of coverlets, including baptisms and funerals.
Katherine uses historical photographs of women and their equipment; color prints from paintings in the National Gallery and line art of plants used for dying wool, of weaving techniques and of weaving patterns. She presents about 130 high-quality color photographs of finished coverlets, either flat so you can see the entire design or a close up section or in use on a bed. In addition there are many, many black and white photographs of more whole coverlets. Some of the detail drawings would also be useful for embroidery and knitting.
The later chapters of the book are devoted one each to the various types of Norwegian woven coverlets. Some of these are pan-Scandinavian and others even pan-European, but the essence always comes back to what Norwegian women had, wanted to have and were willing to create for their homes from roughly the middle ages to modern times.
Each valley or district in the country had a favorite technique and pattern for its coverlets, providing a rich visual texture to the book. The weaving styles and techniques covered include tapestry/billedvev, square-weave/rutevev, bound-weave/krokbragd, other weft-faced styles, knotted pile/rye, (reversible) double-weave/dobeltvev, and overshot/tavlebragd or skillbragd.

The appendices and closing words include a brief afterword about her family's immigration experience, a conversational and a literal table of equivalent of weaving terms among English, Norwegian and Swedish; notes; a glossary of textile terms in English; a bibliography; and a proper index.
This book is NOT a beginner's how-to. It is a highly readable cultural reference book about weaving. It would be a useful addition for anyone making hand-woven textiles, anyone who likes to apply older techniques in modern textile settings (not just weaving), and anyone interested in the cultural history of Norway and for Norwegian-Americans. In short almost everyone interested in Norway.
I was pleased to find my own family's two dominant weaving styles in the later chapters of the book: Danish weave, common in southeastern Norway, and overshot weave, mostly the Monk's Belt pattern. One of my maiden great, great aunts was a professional weaver and both my grandmother and aunt also wove.