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The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction epub download

by William E. Shotts Jr.


The book goes beyond simply walking through all of the command line utilities, and ventures into the realm of theory and how things work . Shotts has definitely made me want to learn all I can about the Linux command line. 11 people found this helpful.

The book goes beyond simply walking through all of the command line utilities, and ventures into the realm of theory and how things work together. Nicholas C. Zakas, web software engineer and author. Anyone who reads this book and makes use of the examples provided will not be able to avoid becoming a Unix command line pro by the time they've hit the end of the book. It provides an excellent introduction to the command line that takes students from knowing nearly nothing to using impressively sophisticated commands.

The Linux Command Line. A Book By William Shotts. org but in much greater detail. In addition to the basics of command line use and shell scripting, The Linux Command Line includes chapters on many common programs used on the command line, as well as more advanced topics.

Overview: This book is a beginner’s guide for fast learning Linux commands which are frequently. Windows Command Line Administration.

Published by. John Wiley & Sons. The Linux Command Line (pdf). 4 MB·10,738 Downloads. The Linux command line: a complete introduction, William E. Shotts, Jr. Linux. Linux Command Line and Shell Scripting Bible. 18 MB·4,359 Downloads. Overview: This book is a beginner’s guide for fast learning Linux commands which are frequently. 03 MB·16,881 Downloads. Thank you for choosing Windows Command Line Administration.

The Linux Command Line book. From The Matrix to Takedown, the hackers are invariably busy at the command line. He writes that we as human beings instinctively know that the only way to really get anything done on a computer is by typing it on a keyboard. William E. A LinuxCommand. This book is part of the LinuxCommand. You may contact the LinuxCommand.

The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal keystrokes to. .

The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal keystrokes to writing full programs in Bash, the most popular Linux shell. Along the way you'll learn the timeless skills handed down by generations of gray-bearded, mouse-shunning gurus: file navigation, environment configuration, command chaining, pattern matching with regular expressions, and more. In addition to that practical knowledge, author William Shotts reveals the philosophy behind these tools and the rich heritage that your desktop Linux machine has inherited from Unix supercomputers of yore. As you make your way through the book's short, easily-digestible chapters, you'll learn how to

The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal . Why Use The Command Line? What This Book Is About. Who Should Read This Book.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction. Category: Компьютеры, Операционные системы

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Category: Компьютеры, Операционные системы. 9 Mb. 8 Mb. #4.

February 3, 2017 Books In addition to that practical knowledge, author William Shotts reveals th.

February 3, 2017 Books. The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction by William E. Shotts Jr. English 2012 ISBN: 1593273897 480 Pages PDF, EPUB, MOBI 10 MB. The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal keystrokes to writing full programs in Bash, the most popular Linux shell.

You've experienced the shiny, point-and-click surface of your Linux computer—now dive below and explore its depths with the power of the command line. The Linux Command Line takes you from your very first terminal keystrokes to writing full programs in Bash, the most popular Linux shell. Along the way you'll learn the timeless skills handed down by generations of gray-bearded, mouse-shunning gurus: file navigation, environment configuration, command chaining, pattern matching with regular expressions, and more. In addition to that practical knowledge, author William Shotts reveals the philosophy behind these tools and the rich heritage that your desktop Linux machine has inherited from Unix supercomputers of yore. As you make your way through the book's short, easily-digestible chapters, you'll learn how to: Create and delete files, directories, and symlinks Administer your system, including networking, package installation, and process management Use standard input and output, redirection, and pipelines Edit files with Vi, the world's most popular text editor Write shell scripts to automate common or boring tasks Slice and dice text files with cut, paste, grep, patch, and sed Once you overcome your initial "shell shock," you'll find that the command line is a natural and expressive way to communicate with your computer. Just don't be surprised if your mouse starts to gather dust.

The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction epub download

ISBN13: 978-1593273897

ISBN: 1593273894

Author: William E. Shotts Jr.

Category: Computers and Technology

Subcategory: Networking & Cloud Computing

Language: English

Publisher: No Starch Press; 1 edition (January 11, 2012)

Pages: 480 pages

ePUB size: 1203 kb

FB2 size: 1479 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 527

Other Formats: lrf txt lrf docx

Related to The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction ePub books

Saberdragon
I have run a Linux system for almost 15 years....got sick of the cost of Window and its upgrades, not to mention the unexplained crashes...and get along good with PCLinuxOS. Once in a while though, I need to correct something that's not doing what I want. Since I only learn about such things that directly affect me and/or my computer, it's often easier to use this book than to sort thru Google and its suggestions and certainly easier than going to classes for computers. I'm 79 years old, high school education, started messing with computers in my mid 60's, and don't even have Windows on my computer anymore. So, don't tell me Linux is intended for "kids" and techs; I'm way more into gardening, horses, saddlemaking, domestic rabbits, chickens and such. If I can make my Linux system do what I want....with the help of this book....so can you. Try it.
Saberdragon
I have run a Linux system for almost 15 years....got sick of the cost of Window and its upgrades, not to mention the unexplained crashes...and get along good with PCLinuxOS. Once in a while though, I need to correct something that's not doing what I want. Since I only learn about such things that directly affect me and/or my computer, it's often easier to use this book than to sort thru Google and its suggestions and certainly easier than going to classes for computers. I'm 79 years old, high school education, started messing with computers in my mid 60's, and don't even have Windows on my computer anymore. So, don't tell me Linux is intended for "kids" and techs; I'm way more into gardening, horses, saddlemaking, domestic rabbits, chickens and such. If I can make my Linux system do what I want....with the help of this book....so can you. Try it.
Mavegar
This has been an amazing book. It should have been the first thing I ever read on Linux. You might think that it's a specialist book of some kind - after all, it is only about the command line. But the command line is where it's at and the author doesn't assume you know anything about Linux. It's actually a complete introduction to Linux and at each step of the way you have a new skill you can start to apply or just something to screw around with on your computer. I mean, there's nothing in Linux that can't be done on the command line. Graphical user interfaces are just a pretty presentation of what's going on underneath. Some people might grumble at "having to learn the command line" but honestly it feels very powerful once you get the handle on it (not as hard as you'd think) and I think linux actually makes doing stuff in the terminal much more fun, intersting, and powerful than in Windows or OSX.

It starts out with navigating folders and files, copying and what-not like you could do through menus and right clicking on a GUI. Then it teaches you some cool tricks you can only do in the command line (and aren't that difficult) like making a folder for each of the letters A-Z (it happens to be sudo mkdir {A..Z} so again, not as hard as you might think). Or maybe you want to find a folder on your computer whose third letter is either a p or a q - you can't quite remember. There's a chapter on permissions which allows you to, say, make a file that is only accessible to users in the group "teachers," or maybe you just want to turn a text document (say you compiled something from C) into something your computer knows can be run. It tells you how to alter the command prompt to display pretty pictures or show a clock. There's a chapter on the very cool way Linux installs programs. It will even teach you some very basic computer programming concepts, enough to start customizing your linux, and how to install a program from source code (again, it's easier than you think).

So it really runs the gamut of all the basics of how Linux works and I think by actually typing in the commands yourself, you gain a much better understanding of the system and how it works. There are other books I'm reading about operating systems and not a lot of it really stuck or made sense until I started reading this book and messing with things myself through commands and editing files (and editing config files makes you feel like a computer wizard when you're starting out). And there's something about the way it's written, the language, the pacing, the occasionally joke that is just rare enough that it catches you off guard. My only criticism would be that the "Gentle Introduction to Vim" could have been a little more gentle. Perhaps by spacing it out over a couple of chapters to let it sink in rather than trying to remember all of the keyboard shortcuts that make vim what it is all in one chapter. But it's a minor point compared to how much I feel like I've learned reading this book.
Mavegar
This has been an amazing book. It should have been the first thing I ever read on Linux. You might think that it's a specialist book of some kind - after all, it is only about the command line. But the command line is where it's at and the author doesn't assume you know anything about Linux. It's actually a complete introduction to Linux and at each step of the way you have a new skill you can start to apply or just something to screw around with on your computer. I mean, there's nothing in Linux that can't be done on the command line. Graphical user interfaces are just a pretty presentation of what's going on underneath. Some people might grumble at "having to learn the command line" but honestly it feels very powerful once you get the handle on it (not as hard as you'd think) and I think linux actually makes doing stuff in the terminal much more fun, intersting, and powerful than in Windows or OSX.

It starts out with navigating folders and files, copying and what-not like you could do through menus and right clicking on a GUI. Then it teaches you some cool tricks you can only do in the command line (and aren't that difficult) like making a folder for each of the letters A-Z (it happens to be sudo mkdir {A..Z} so again, not as hard as you might think). Or maybe you want to find a folder on your computer whose third letter is either a p or a q - you can't quite remember. There's a chapter on permissions which allows you to, say, make a file that is only accessible to users in the group "teachers," or maybe you just want to turn a text document (say you compiled something from C) into something your computer knows can be run. It tells you how to alter the command prompt to display pretty pictures or show a clock. There's a chapter on the very cool way Linux installs programs. It will even teach you some very basic computer programming concepts, enough to start customizing your linux, and how to install a program from source code (again, it's easier than you think).

So it really runs the gamut of all the basics of how Linux works and I think by actually typing in the commands yourself, you gain a much better understanding of the system and how it works. There are other books I'm reading about operating systems and not a lot of it really stuck or made sense until I started reading this book and messing with things myself through commands and editing files (and editing config files makes you feel like a computer wizard when you're starting out). And there's something about the way it's written, the language, the pacing, the occasionally joke that is just rare enough that it catches you off guard. My only criticism would be that the "Gentle Introduction to Vim" could have been a little more gentle. Perhaps by spacing it out over a couple of chapters to let it sink in rather than trying to remember all of the keyboard shortcuts that make vim what it is all in one chapter. But it's a minor point compared to how much I feel like I've learned reading this book.
Moronydit
I have a handful of books on Linux and Linux topics. If I could go back in time a few years and recommend one to myself, this would be THE book to cover Linux, without a question. There are two types of Linux books really: learning books, and reference books. This is a learning book. It gives you enough detail on commands and ideas to feel comfortable, but doesn't overload you with every detail--that's what the man pages are for! This goes through lots of important commands sorted into various topics, then finishes off with a very well-written and clear treatment of scripting in the last section. I love this book!! I will recommend it to all of my coworkers who are looking to delve deeper into Linux.
Moronydit
I have a handful of books on Linux and Linux topics. If I could go back in time a few years and recommend one to myself, this would be THE book to cover Linux, without a question. There are two types of Linux books really: learning books, and reference books. This is a learning book. It gives you enough detail on commands and ideas to feel comfortable, but doesn't overload you with every detail--that's what the man pages are for! This goes through lots of important commands sorted into various topics, then finishes off with a very well-written and clear treatment of scripting in the last section. I love this book!! I will recommend it to all of my coworkers who are looking to delve deeper into Linux.
Lesesshe
When I downloaded this book I was completely unfamiliar with use of the command line. By the time I was a third of the way into the book I was very excited about what I was leaning. Another reviewer complained that the author did not present enough detail on some subjects, but I think that is unfair. Clearly, since the book starts with the very basic techniques it is directed toward people like me- people who are not familiar with command line techniques. Shotts gives clear examples of every command and ample opportunity to try out those commands. Most amazing, from my inexperienced point of view, is the fact that his examples worked perfectly and I didn't wreck my computer. As pointed out by other reviewers, his writing style has a friendly, informal feel and makes the new user feel like maybe he is not a complete idiot. I have finished about half of the book and am looking forward to the remainder. I'm sure I'll feel sorry when I finish the book but will want to find a followup that will expand my knowledge of the command line. Shotts has definitely made me want to learn all I can about the Linux command line.
Lesesshe
When I downloaded this book I was completely unfamiliar with use of the command line. By the time I was a third of the way into the book I was very excited about what I was leaning. Another reviewer complained that the author did not present enough detail on some subjects, but I think that is unfair. Clearly, since the book starts with the very basic techniques it is directed toward people like me- people who are not familiar with command line techniques. Shotts gives clear examples of every command and ample opportunity to try out those commands. Most amazing, from my inexperienced point of view, is the fact that his examples worked perfectly and I didn't wreck my computer. As pointed out by other reviewers, his writing style has a friendly, informal feel and makes the new user feel like maybe he is not a complete idiot. I have finished about half of the book and am looking forward to the remainder. I'm sure I'll feel sorry when I finish the book but will want to find a followup that will expand my knowledge of the command line. Shotts has definitely made me want to learn all I can about the Linux command line.
post_name
I love this book!! This book has helped me advance my career it was how I learned how to walk in linux using the command line! The only thing is that even though the book is not that old... being that RedHat 7 and Debian 9 are using systemd there is a few things here and there that have to be tweaked around either way the OS will redirect most of the commands. Great buy! If this book gets an update to use systemd I would definately buy it!!
post_name
I love this book!! This book has helped me advance my career it was how I learned how to walk in linux using the command line! The only thing is that even though the book is not that old... being that RedHat 7 and Debian 9 are using systemd there is a few things here and there that have to be tweaked around either way the OS will redirect most of the commands. Great buy! If this book gets an update to use systemd I would definately buy it!!