» » 21st Century Game Design (Charles River Media Game Development)

21st Century Game Design (Charles River Media Game Development) epub download

by Richard Boon,Chris Bateman


21st Century Game Design is not so much about games - it's about understanding the people who play them.

21st Century Game Design is not so much about games - it's about understanding the people who play them. The book presents a model for understanding players and their differing motivations and skills, in terms of Myers-Briggs personality types and the Keirsey Temperament Sorter.

21st Century Game Design is not just a book about game design. Chris Bateman is Managing Director of International Hobo, a specialist company in the field of market-oriented game design and narrative, and a noted game designer and writer. It's an answer to two important questions: who are we designing games for and how do we do it best? Written by industry pros, the book teaches designers how to design better games from a why perspective. His games include Discworld Noir, Ghost Master and, Bratz: Rock Angels. He sits on the executive panel of the IGDA Game Writers┬┐ special interest group, and is also co-author of 21st Century Game Design.

It?s an answer to two important questions: who are we designing games for and how do we do it best? Written by industry pros, the book teaches designers how to design better games from a why perspective. All good designers know the fundamentals of how to design a game, but learning to design games that really satisfy your players takes more than technical skill. To do this successfully, you need to know your intended audience and understand their needs. Chris Bateman, Richard Boon. 21st Century Game Design is not just a book about game design.

21st Century Game Design. ISBN 1-58450-429-3) by Chris Bateman and Richard Boon. Game Development Series): by Paul Steed. Tips and tricks on game animation from the professionals in the industry, especially for the 3D Max artist. Understanding Digital Games. ISBN 1-4129-0034-4/. Game Modeling Using Low Polygon Techniques.

Infobox Book name 21st Century Game Design title orig translator image caption Front Cover author Chris Bateman Richard Boon illustrator cover . It was first published by Charles River Media in August 29, 2005

It was first published by Charles River Media in August 29, 2005. The main innovation of the book is the focus on "demographic game design" through the use of a new for game developers and publishers. Book DescriptionWritten for game programmers and developers, this book covers GPU techniques and supporting applications that are commonly used in games and similar real-time 3D applications

21st Century Game Design is not just a book about game design. Book DescriptionWritten for game programmers and developers, this book covers GPU techniques and supporting applications that are commonly used in games and similar real-time 3D applications. The authors describe the design of programs and systems that.

21st Century Game Design (ISBN 978-1-58-450429-0) is a book by Chris Bateman and Richard Boon. This book is part of the "Game Development Series". It was first published by Charles River Media in August 29, 2005.

by Chris Bateman, Richard Boon. ISBN 9781584504290 (978-1-58450-429-0) Softcover, Charles River Media, 2005. Find signed collectible books: '21st Century Game Design (Game Development Series) (Charles River Media Game Development)'.

Richard Boon, Chris Bateman. Place of Publication. Computer Games: Programming. 332. Author Biography. He sits on the executive panel of the IGDA Game Writers? special interest group, and is also co-author of 21st Century Game Design.

21st Century Game Design is not just a book about game design. It's an answer to two important questions: who are we designing games for and how do we do it best? Written by industry pros, the book teaches designers how to design better games from a why perspective. All good designers know the fundamentals of how to design a game, but learning to design games that really satisfy your players takes more than technical skill. To do this successfully, you need to know your intended audience and understand their needs. Throughout the book you'll learn about defining and investigating player needs. A model of play styles is then presented that was developed by applying psychological metrics to survey data and case studies. This model identifi es some of the core themes in player needs as represented by four player types-- Conqueror, Manager, Wanderer, and Participant. In addition to discussing player needs, the book also explores how games can reach wider audiences by appealing to the interests of the core gaming community, and it considers the fundamental principles of game design. Methods such as interface design, structural elements, and game world abstractions are discussed in relation to the needs of the audience. The book does not attempt to present an absolute view of the craft of game design, but rather it demonstrates how an audience model can inform the design process and take the games industry forward at a time when it is facing a schism between the games that the audience would like to play, and the games the development community would like to make. Game designers, producers, marketing executives, and anyone who wishes to understand the relationship between a game and its audience will find much to learn from 21st Century Game Design. Author's Reflections Six Years On...

It's been six years since Richard Boon and I wrote 21st Century Game Design, and since then many of the claims we made which once were revolutionary are now commonplace. The idea that commercial game design requires models that help developers understand how and why people play games was still quite revolutionary in 2005. Richard Bartle's work had pointed in the general direction almost ten years earlier, but had been constrained to massively multiplayer games, and was more qualitative and less quantitative than the research described in this book.

The biggest sign of the success of our approach was the IEEE's creation of a Player Satisfaction Modelling Task Force in 2009, which I was appointed too in recognition for my work helping to establish the domain. Since then, I've been amazed at some of the incredible work that's been going on in player satisfaction, and happy to have contributed to the field's growth and development.

There are far more up-to-date player satisfaction models than the DGD1 described in this book, but there is still no better introduction to the idea of using player models to guide game design than 21st Century Game Design. What's more, the work Richard did in constructing a historical snapshot of game design in the context of this model gives a remarkable account of the development of videogames, one with a lot to teach about how games have been made, and how they could be made in the future.

But despite the most groundbreaking aspect of this book being its presentation of player satisfaction modelling--even before this term came into use!--what I look back upon most fondly in this title is our perspective on game design. The chapter on Foundations of Game Design remains an excellent introduction to the issues in practical game design and development (although we don't much use the terminology in this chapter any more) and the recognition of abstraction as part of the process of design remains relevant today.

There is a set of chapters here that will help any new game designer understand what it is they are trying to do, while an experienced game designer will find a lot to agree with, and some new ways of thinking about old problems. The discussion of Game Structures (Chapter 10) is as relevant today as it was when we wrote it--and terms like "playground worlds," "Breadcrumbing," and "Funnelling" have since been used by a great variety of game designers and game writers. It's satisfying to see our work being used by other people to help them make games.

If you are new to game design, 21st Century Game Design is an excellent primer in the practical aspects of commercial videogame design, and if you have more experience you'll find ideas in here that might expand your perspective on the discipline. There are a lot of great books on game design, but none are quite like this one.

Chris Bateman April 2011

21st Century Game Design (Charles River Media Game Development) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1584504290

ISBN: 1584504293

Author: Richard Boon,Chris Bateman

Category: Computers and Technology

Subcategory: Games & Strategy Guides

Language: English

Publisher: Cengage Learning; 1 edition (August 29, 2005)

Pages: 332 pages

ePUB size: 1402 kb

FB2 size: 1943 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 849

Other Formats: mbr lrf mobi rtf

Related to 21st Century Game Design (Charles River Media Game Development) ePub books

Hadadel
The title is slightly deceiving as a large portion of the book is exclusively focused on the psychology of different player models and styles of play. But this was why I purchased the book. It is this detailed analysis of player psychology and how it applies to design which makes 21st Century Game Design so relevant. Especially at a time when the game market is being turned inside out by disruptive competition, innovation and technology.

Through objective analysis of (what was at the time) new player research, Bateman and Boon provide strong evidence that the preferences of designers and programmers may more often than not, be misaligned with the preferences of the most common player types in the gaming audience. And as the authors noted: "What is clear is that designers who design games solely to please their own sensibilities are unlikely to create genuinely mass market games."

Learning to understand why this is the case is why 21st Century Game Design should be required reading for all game designers, programmers, creative directors, producers, etc...
Hadadel
The title is slightly deceiving as a large portion of the book is exclusively focused on the psychology of different player models and styles of play. But this was why I purchased the book. It is this detailed analysis of player psychology and how it applies to design which makes 21st Century Game Design so relevant. Especially at a time when the game market is being turned inside out by disruptive competition, innovation and technology.

Through objective analysis of (what was at the time) new player research, Bateman and Boon provide strong evidence that the preferences of designers and programmers may more often than not, be misaligned with the preferences of the most common player types in the gaming audience. And as the authors noted: "What is clear is that designers who design games solely to please their own sensibilities are unlikely to create genuinely mass market games."

Learning to understand why this is the case is why 21st Century Game Design should be required reading for all game designers, programmers, creative directors, producers, etc...
Ces
The book is somewhat dated not including discussion of any games released on the past ten years. This needs to be rectified in a new volume perhaps. The best part of the book for me was the discussion of gamer types, which is basically the first half. Also, there are still relevant discussions of game design such as decisions about making the UI, game world abstraction, etc.

But so many important games have released since this book was published, that we need a new edition.
Ces
The book is somewhat dated not including discussion of any games released on the past ten years. This needs to be rectified in a new volume perhaps. The best part of the book for me was the discussion of gamer types, which is basically the first half. Also, there are still relevant discussions of game design such as decisions about making the UI, game world abstraction, etc.

But so many important games have released since this book was published, that we need a new edition.
Braned
21st Century Game Design is not so much about games - it's about understanding the people who play them. The book presents a model for understanding players and their differing motivations and skills, in terms of Myers-Briggs personality types and the Keirsey Temperament Sorter. The authors make sure to emphasize that the broad categorizations they present are not meant to peg individual people into boxes, but rather to describe the tendencies of large populations of players. It's great if you enjoy thinking about personality types, but if you tend to get offended by the thought of labeling and categorizing people, you'll probably have a hard time with this book.

Personally, I find the approach very valuable in getting beyond my own particular preferences and prejudices around what games are and what "fun" is. For example, the book presents four main player types: Conquerors, Managers, Wanderers, and Participants. As I personally tend toward "Wanderer" play, it would be easy for me to believe that a game is "good" only if it has an interesting world that I can wander around in. But in fact, there are many other ways to judge and enjoy a game, and I would be blind to a huge amount of thinking about games (and people playing and buying them) if I did not look beyond my own experience. In particular, the game industry has traditionally been very preoccupied with "Conqueror" gameplay, the fun of conquering challenges, and there are still many people who fail to acknowledge the validity (and commercial potential) in other types of fun. 21st Century Game Design presents a systematic way for understanding these variations, even if you don't personally feel them yourself.

If you're interested in widening your perspective on games and what they are to different people, read this book. It may not give you a hundred different ways to look at games like The Art of Game Design, but it takes one insightful structure and goes all the way with it. The Myers-Briggs-inspired system presented in 21st Century Game Design has ingrained itself into my own understanding of games more than any other system I've encountered. If you're like me, you'll probably get a lot out of it too.
Braned
21st Century Game Design is not so much about games - it's about understanding the people who play them. The book presents a model for understanding players and their differing motivations and skills, in terms of Myers-Briggs personality types and the Keirsey Temperament Sorter. The authors make sure to emphasize that the broad categorizations they present are not meant to peg individual people into boxes, but rather to describe the tendencies of large populations of players. It's great if you enjoy thinking about personality types, but if you tend to get offended by the thought of labeling and categorizing people, you'll probably have a hard time with this book.

Personally, I find the approach very valuable in getting beyond my own particular preferences and prejudices around what games are and what "fun" is. For example, the book presents four main player types: Conquerors, Managers, Wanderers, and Participants. As I personally tend toward "Wanderer" play, it would be easy for me to believe that a game is "good" only if it has an interesting world that I can wander around in. But in fact, there are many other ways to judge and enjoy a game, and I would be blind to a huge amount of thinking about games (and people playing and buying them) if I did not look beyond my own experience. In particular, the game industry has traditionally been very preoccupied with "Conqueror" gameplay, the fun of conquering challenges, and there are still many people who fail to acknowledge the validity (and commercial potential) in other types of fun. 21st Century Game Design presents a systematic way for understanding these variations, even if you don't personally feel them yourself.

If you're interested in widening your perspective on games and what they are to different people, read this book. It may not give you a hundred different ways to look at games like The Art of Game Design, but it takes one insightful structure and goes all the way with it. The Myers-Briggs-inspired system presented in 21st Century Game Design has ingrained itself into my own understanding of games more than any other system I've encountered. If you're like me, you'll probably get a lot out of it too.
Doukree
I suppose it comes as no surprise to anyone to hear that game design has gotten very complex. The power of computers has grown tremendously since the first games like Pong. And with the ability to do more on the computer, and with more competition in the marketplace the need for a higher class of game designer has become clear.

Now game designers have to consider such things as the age, gender, ability, attitude of the player -- many years ago my daughter got hooked on the Roger Rabit game. I told an executive in the Disney game group that they needed some games for young girls. He turned me down with a huff. 'We have Mickey Mouse,' he said. 'Yes,' I told him, 'but you also have Minnie Mouse.' He tuned me out. Now such a manager couldn't afford to ignore such an audience.

This is a book written by professionals on what it will take to suceed in game development in the coming years. These people have 'been there, done that,' pay attention to what they say.
Doukree
I suppose it comes as no surprise to anyone to hear that game design has gotten very complex. The power of computers has grown tremendously since the first games like Pong. And with the ability to do more on the computer, and with more competition in the marketplace the need for a higher class of game designer has become clear.

Now game designers have to consider such things as the age, gender, ability, attitude of the player -- many years ago my daughter got hooked on the Roger Rabit game. I told an executive in the Disney game group that they needed some games for young girls. He turned me down with a huff. 'We have Mickey Mouse,' he said. 'Yes,' I told him, 'but you also have Minnie Mouse.' He tuned me out. Now such a manager couldn't afford to ignore such an audience.

This is a book written by professionals on what it will take to suceed in game development in the coming years. These people have 'been there, done that,' pay attention to what they say.