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Buddhist Practice on Western Ground: Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology epub download

by Harvey B. Aronson


Harvey B. Aronson presents a constructive and practical assessment of common conflicts experienced by Westerners who look to Eastern spiritual traditions for guidance and support-and find themselves confused or disappointed.

book by Harvey B. Aronson. Buddhist Practice on Western Ground : Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology. by Harvey B.

Start by marking Buddhist Practice on Western Ground: Reconciling . This book does take Buddhist precepts for granted. The author This book was worthwhile to read.

Start by marking Buddhist Practice on Western Ground: Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

what Western psychology might contribute to meeting the personal, psychological and spiritual needs of modern persons. But might it be that individuals get out of Buddhism only what they are looking for, abstracted from the broader Buddhist way of life and thought? And might it be that what they are getting out of Buddhism speaks only partially to the challenges confronted by men in women in the world of the late modern West?

Aronson, harvey b. (2004).

Aronson, harvey b. Buddhist practice on Western ground: Reconciling Eastern ideals and Western psychology. Boston, MA: Shambhala Publications. Aronson's book is predicated upon the notion that Buddhist practice alone does not address all of the modern psychological concerns of its western adepts. The reasons for this lack are rooted in cultural difference

Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology. teachings on no-self, or egolessness. About Buddhist Practice on Western Ground.

Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology. Harvey B. Issues addressed include

Harvey B. Aronson, P.

Harvey B. He travels and lectures on Buddhist philosophy and psychology at universities and at academic and Buddhist conferences around the country. Shambhala Publications Inc.

We speak on mindfulness, overcoming trauma through establishing therapeutic alliances, as well as different forms of Buddhism and how they approach spiritual awakenings.

This is the first book to offer Buddhist meditators a comprehensive and sympathetic examination of the differences between Asian and Western cultural and spiritual values. Harvey B. Aronson presents a constructive and practical assessment of common conflicts experienced by Westerners who look to Eastern spiritual traditions for guidance and support—and find themselves confused or disappointed. Issues addressed include:    •  Our cultural belief that anger should not be suppressed versus the Buddhist teaching to counter anger and hatred    •  Our psychotherapists' advice that attachment is the basis for healthy personal development and supportive relationships versus the Buddhist condemnation of attachments as the source of suffering    •  Our culture's emphasis on individuality versus the Asian emphasis on interdependence and fulfillment of duties, and the Buddhist teachings on no-self, or egolessness

Buddhist Practice on Western Ground: Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology epub download

ISBN13: 978-1590300930

ISBN: 1590300939

Author: Harvey B. Aronson

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Worship & Devotion

Language: English

Publisher: Shambhala; 1st edition (August 10, 2004)

Pages: 253 pages

ePUB size: 1512 kb

FB2 size: 1720 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 211

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Related to Buddhist Practice on Western Ground: Reconciling Eastern Ideals and Western Psychology ePub books

Skillet
For more than half a century scholars and psychologists have been trying to see whether the practices and philosophy of Eastern religions and philosophical systems can be engaged with Western psychology. Some of the finest attempts at doing this have come from Ken Wilber, Roger Walsh and Frances Vaughan. To their number we should now add the name Harvey Aronson. I do not know him, but I read that he is a psychotherapist and Buddhist lecturer and this is one of the most comprehensive attempts to examine the basic differences and convergences between Asian and Western cultural and spiritual values.

This is far from being an arcane topic. Virtually every meditation teacher has been struck by the amount of psychological work that we need to do. Not just at the outset, but, as practice continues, many psychological issues tend to come up. Often people find themselves struggling with the apparent contradictions of being a Christian and needing therapy. Or alternatively of being a Western practitioner of Buddhism who enters therapy and then has to try and reconcile the apparent contradictions between a meditation practice that stresses the gradual dissolution of the ego and social inter-dependence, with therapeutic models that tend to emphasize ego-strengthening, autonomy and individuality.

The influential Chögyam Trungpa, founder of Naropa University in Boulder, talked a lot about meditation as therapy, but always said that meditation should be seen as an unconditional way of life rather than a form or medicine or healing.

The author's background enables him to expand on the subject in a way that only a few other writers have. In this book he focuses on the four central strands of the teachings of the Buddha: The Self, anger, love and attachment, and how these strands can illuminate and enrich Western psychological thought.

This is a well-written, clear and practical book that I recommend highly.
Skillet
For more than half a century scholars and psychologists have been trying to see whether the practices and philosophy of Eastern religions and philosophical systems can be engaged with Western psychology. Some of the finest attempts at doing this have come from Ken Wilber, Roger Walsh and Frances Vaughan. To their number we should now add the name Harvey Aronson. I do not know him, but I read that he is a psychotherapist and Buddhist lecturer and this is one of the most comprehensive attempts to examine the basic differences and convergences between Asian and Western cultural and spiritual values.

This is far from being an arcane topic. Virtually every meditation teacher has been struck by the amount of psychological work that we need to do. Not just at the outset, but, as practice continues, many psychological issues tend to come up. Often people find themselves struggling with the apparent contradictions of being a Christian and needing therapy. Or alternatively of being a Western practitioner of Buddhism who enters therapy and then has to try and reconcile the apparent contradictions between a meditation practice that stresses the gradual dissolution of the ego and social inter-dependence, with therapeutic models that tend to emphasize ego-strengthening, autonomy and individuality.

The influential Chögyam Trungpa, founder of Naropa University in Boulder, talked a lot about meditation as therapy, but always said that meditation should be seen as an unconditional way of life rather than a form or medicine or healing.

The author's background enables him to expand on the subject in a way that only a few other writers have. In this book he focuses on the four central strands of the teachings of the Buddha: The Self, anger, love and attachment, and how these strands can illuminate and enrich Western psychological thought.

This is a well-written, clear and practical book that I recommend highly.
Quendant
As a Social Work student, I have taken several classes on counseling/therapy and I was struggling with how to reconcile the ideas I was learning in my classes with the philosophy of Buddhism. Coming across Aronson's book has been a great help to me in addressing these questions. On the surface it may seem like psychotherapy and Buddhism clash on ideas of anger, the self, and attachment, but as Aronson explains, they are not really so contradictory after all.

I also appreciate the words of caution he has for westerners taking up this religion. The cultural differences are real and it would be a mistake to ignore them. If we're not careful, we as westerners can use our Buddhist practice to reinforce dysfunctional behavioral patterns and thinking. I was surprised how spot on Aronson was in identifying these problems. He is clearly someone who is very familiar with both Buddhism and psychotherapy and has a deep understanding of how the two can interact for westerners. I learned a great deal about myself in reading this book and I am very grateful to Aronson for that.

I highly recommend this book for any western Buddhist, whether they are involved in psychotherapy or not, and also for any therapists in general as it will help them understand some of the struggles their Buddhist clients may be experiencing.
Quendant
As a Social Work student, I have taken several classes on counseling/therapy and I was struggling with how to reconcile the ideas I was learning in my classes with the philosophy of Buddhism. Coming across Aronson's book has been a great help to me in addressing these questions. On the surface it may seem like psychotherapy and Buddhism clash on ideas of anger, the self, and attachment, but as Aronson explains, they are not really so contradictory after all.

I also appreciate the words of caution he has for westerners taking up this religion. The cultural differences are real and it would be a mistake to ignore them. If we're not careful, we as westerners can use our Buddhist practice to reinforce dysfunctional behavioral patterns and thinking. I was surprised how spot on Aronson was in identifying these problems. He is clearly someone who is very familiar with both Buddhism and psychotherapy and has a deep understanding of how the two can interact for westerners. I learned a great deal about myself in reading this book and I am very grateful to Aronson for that.

I highly recommend this book for any western Buddhist, whether they are involved in psychotherapy or not, and also for any therapists in general as it will help them understand some of the struggles their Buddhist clients may be experiencing.
Barit
My professional experience is in software and business, I have no formal education in mental health. As a vipassana meditator who also does therapy work, I have found this book right on target with the dilemmas I and fellow sangha members frequently struggle with, and new clarity about why those struggles are so common - because of the cultural collision between US culture and the embedded culture of the practice we are working to adopt. It took me over a year to finish this book because I so frequently found enough food for thought that I would put it down for a month or so, and then when I picked it up again I would find myself re-reading chapters rather than making forward progress. This remains one of the most valuable books on my shelf. Thank you Dr. Aronson.
Barit
My professional experience is in software and business, I have no formal education in mental health. As a vipassana meditator who also does therapy work, I have found this book right on target with the dilemmas I and fellow sangha members frequently struggle with, and new clarity about why those struggles are so common - because of the cultural collision between US culture and the embedded culture of the practice we are working to adopt. It took me over a year to finish this book because I so frequently found enough food for thought that I would put it down for a month or so, and then when I picked it up again I would find myself re-reading chapters rather than making forward progress. This remains one of the most valuable books on my shelf. Thank you Dr. Aronson.
Gamba
This book offers simple, lucid, but profoundly insightful reflections on the potential pitfalls of embracing a spiritual tradition from another culture. Each chapter explores an important concept from Asian Buddhism(s) and the ways Westerners--steeped as we are in a psychological understanding of the mind--can mis-hear teachings on it. A must-have guide for anyone from a European-derived culture trying to walk the transformative path of Buddhism.
Gamba
This book offers simple, lucid, but profoundly insightful reflections on the potential pitfalls of embracing a spiritual tradition from another culture. Each chapter explores an important concept from Asian Buddhism(s) and the ways Westerners--steeped as we are in a psychological understanding of the mind--can mis-hear teachings on it. A must-have guide for anyone from a European-derived culture trying to walk the transformative path of Buddhism.
Samugor
I have been pestering Shambhala to get this book into Kindle format since it is about the very best there is at highlighting differences between most American attitudes, especially in marriage and love, and that derived from ancient Buddhism.
Samugor
I have been pestering Shambhala to get this book into Kindle format since it is about the very best there is at highlighting differences between most American attitudes, especially in marriage and love, and that derived from ancient Buddhism.
Windworker
This is an excellent book I've got a lot out of it. I will keep it for my permanent collection.
Windworker
This is an excellent book I've got a lot out of it. I will keep it for my permanent collection.
Delagamand
This is a superb book covering the fascinating topic of psychotherapy and Buddhism. Among the many books on this subject, Aronson's stands out for many reasons. Most books in this area are written by psychoanalysts or therapists who have done some Buddhist practice. Aronson is unusual in being an authorized Dharma teacher (Tibetan Buddhism) who has spent many years in Asia studying with a variety of Buddhist masters, being a Buddhist scholar, as well as being a highly trained psychoanalytic psychotherapist. This enables him to offer a thoughtful and illuminating discussion of the key issues that arise in the integration of these two paths: the ego, anger, love, and attachment. In addition the book is unusual and helpful because of the broad and deep cross-cultural perspective that Aronson brings to his work. All in all - highly recommended.
Delagamand
This is a superb book covering the fascinating topic of psychotherapy and Buddhism. Among the many books on this subject, Aronson's stands out for many reasons. Most books in this area are written by psychoanalysts or therapists who have done some Buddhist practice. Aronson is unusual in being an authorized Dharma teacher (Tibetan Buddhism) who has spent many years in Asia studying with a variety of Buddhist masters, being a Buddhist scholar, as well as being a highly trained psychoanalytic psychotherapist. This enables him to offer a thoughtful and illuminating discussion of the key issues that arise in the integration of these two paths: the ego, anger, love, and attachment. In addition the book is unusual and helpful because of the broad and deep cross-cultural perspective that Aronson brings to his work. All in all - highly recommended.