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So-called Historical Jesus and the Historic, Biblical Christ epub download

by Martin Kahler,Carl E. Braaten


Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

3 Martin Kahler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic Biblical Christ, trans. Car! E. Braaten (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1964; orig Jesus is being refracted through the spirit of these gentlemen themselves. 4 Albert Schweitzer, The Quest of the Historical Jesus, trans. Although very little of the historical Jesus survived the early church's desire to make him relevant to their present concerns, enough remained to allow us to say with certainty that Jesus preached with authority and shattered Jewish tradition in his preaching.

Kahler’s book The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historical Biblical Christ . Translated by C. E. Braaten. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1964. Kahler addressed the interest in the historical Jesus among scholars in the late 1800s

Kahler’s book The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historical Biblical Christ was one of his most influential works-influencing and bearing similarities to the later theologies of Barth, Bultmann, and Tillich. Kahler’s title is intentionally paradoxical: it puts in opposition what seem at first to be the same thing. Kahler addressed the interest in the historical Jesus among scholars in the late 1800s. He make the point that the church has only had a relationship with the Jesus of the scripture and an objective biography of Jesus can not be found in the Gospels.

Each book of the New Testament is treated in its historical setting. Christ, and the total Biblical picture of him embraces both the historical and supra-historical dimensions

Each book of the New Testament is treated in its historical setting. Students and teachers in parishes and seminaries are bound to be grateful. Kahler's Der sogenannte historische Jesus und der geschichtliche, biblische Christus (the main essay of which was first published in 1892 and repeated with three additional essays in 1896) scarcely falls in the same category. Christ, and the total Biblical picture of him embraces both the historical and supra-historical dimensions. Here Barth is most reminiscent of Kahler, for in the Dogmatik Barth speaks evocatively about the Royal Man while at the same time refusing to be led into a "Babylonian captivity" behind the texts.

Keywords: Called Historical, historical Jesus, Historic Biblical, Martin Kahler, Fortress Press, Biblical Christ, Carl.

Ka?hler, Martin, 1835-1912. Uniform Title: Sogenannte historische Jesus und der geschichtliche, biblische Christus. Download DOC book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

I prefer to use "the Jesus of history" and "the historical Jesus" interchangeably to refer to the hypothetical .

Such equivalent usage seems to be the prevalent one among writers today. For further reflections on Kähler's relation to more recent quests, see Carl E. Braaten, "Martin Kahler on the Historic Biblical Christ," in The Historical Jesus and the Kerygmatic Christ, ed. Carl E. Braaten and Roy A. Harrisville (New York/Nashville: Abingdon, 1964) 79-105.

The First (old) Quest -reimarus -DF Strauss -Albert Schweitzer & Martin Kahler -Rudolf Bultmann Bottom line: The historical Jesus is not relevant for faith to occur The Second (new) Quest -Ernst Kasemann & Gunther Bornkamm -James Robinson -S Kierkegaard & M Heidegger Bottom line.

The First (old) Quest -reimarus -DF Strauss -Albert Schweitzer & Martin Kahler -Rudolf Bultmann Bottom line: The historical Jesus is not relevant for faith to occur The Second (new) Quest -Ernst Kasemann & Gunther Bornkamm -James Robinson -S Kierkegaard & M Heidegger Bottom line: There MUST have been some historical character for Christianity

The Text of The SoCalled Historical Jesus and the Historic Bibli.

The Text of The SoCalled Historical Jesus and the Historic Bibli. 14. Christ? 42. The Foundation of Faith in the Christ of the Whole. Kahler's theology Karl Barth kerygma Life-of-Jesus movement Luther Martin Kahler means mediating ment merely Messiah mind modern narratives objectivism Old Testament original Otto Ritschl person picture of Christ portrayal of Jesus position preaching present presuppositions problem proclamation Protestant quest question reality reliable religious resurrection revelation Richard Rothe Ritschl Ritschlian Rudolf Bultmann Savior scientific Scripture significance sinless sources subjectivism Synoptics theologians.

Book by Kahler, Martin

So-called Historical Jesus and the Historic, Biblical Christ epub download

ISBN13: 978-0800619602

ISBN: 0800619609

Author: Martin Kahler,Carl E. Braaten

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Theology

Language: German

Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishing; New edition edition (December 1964)

Pages: 153 pages

ePUB size: 1325 kb

FB2 size: 1432 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 933

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Related to So-called Historical Jesus and the Historic, Biblical Christ ePub books

Wenes
This is a great text, as timely today as when it was written so many years ago. With all the various "quests" over the past 100 years or so, Kahler still speaks a wisdom for us all to ponder in the face of so many diverse voices.
Wenes
This is a great text, as timely today as when it was written so many years ago. With all the various "quests" over the past 100 years or so, Kahler still speaks a wisdom for us all to ponder in the face of so many diverse voices.
showtime
Martin Kähler (1835-1912) was a German Protestant theologian, who wrote this short book in 1892. [NOTE: page numbers below refer to a 153-page paperback edition.]

In his Introductory Remarks, he states, “The old but ever-new question … is still very much alive in our own time: ‘What do you think of the Christ?’ [Mt 22:42] This question is seldom coolly dismissed… My theme is a paradox. It places in opposition two statements which might seem to be saying exactly the same thing… I wish to summarize my cry of warning in a form intentionally audacious: the historical Jesus of modern authors conceals from us the living Christ. The Jesus of the ‘Life-of-Jesus movement’ is merely a modern example of human creativity, and not an iota better than the notorious dogmatic Christ of Byzantine Christology. One is as far removed from the real Christ as the other.” (Pg. 42-43)

He asserts, “I regard the entire Life-of-Jesus movement as a blind alley… The Life-of-Jesus movement is completely in the right insofar as it set the Bible against an abstract dogmatism. It becomes illegitimate as soon as it begins to rend and dissect the Bible without having acquired a clear understanding of the special nature of the problem and the peculiar significance of Scripture for such understanding… Hence a person may immerse himself in Jesus’ actions… So he plumbs the depths of Jesus’ consciousness… from his mother’s bosom to his father’s workshop and into the synagogue---and then he is most certainly heading up a blind alley! For the cardinal virtue of genuine historical research is modesty.” (Pg. 46-47)

He observes, “Why, in the final analysis, do we commune with the Jesus of our Gospels? What does he offer us? … Do I really need to know more of him than what Paul delivered to [the Corinthians] as of first importance, that [he] also received, that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared…? … This is the witness and confession of faith which has overcome the world… If I have this I do not need additional information on the precise details of Jesus life and death.” (Pg. 59-60)

But he adds, “Then why the Gospels?... the reason we commune with the Jesus of our Gospels is because it is through them that we learn to know the same Jesus whom… we meet at the right hand of God… he who once walked on earth and is now is exalted … because he is for us God revealed.” (Pg. 60-61)

He explains, “my arguments deal only with those theologians who wish to write a ‘Life of Jesus’ in the service of the confession of Christ, and who think… that their work can do more to strengthen this confession than can dogmatics. I am concerned with a correct evaluation of what the constructive historical method can accomplish, particularly what it can contribute toward the right attitude toward Christ within the Church, the bearer of the gospel.” (Pg. 69)

He suggests, “It is true that at first glance there seems to be a great disparity between the accounts in the Gospels and the ‘dogmatic’ statements about Christ in the Epistles. Yet they are more closely related than at first appears. The Fourth Gospel is an obvious link between the Synoptics and the Epistles…. If, however, we take our Gospels just as they stand, then we find in them the same ‘dogmatic’ character as we find, for example, in the messianic sermons in the book of Acts… For this very reason, until the modern era the church never sensed any disparity between the historical presentation and the dogmatic preaching in the New Testament.” (Pg. 82-83)

He states, “We want to make absolutely clear that ultimately we believe in Christ, not on account of any authority, but because he himself evokes such faith from us. This thought that ‘Christ himself is the originator of the biblical picture of Christ’ is implicit in what was said earlier… If now, with the recognition given to their differences, the first eyewitnesses were nevertheless in agreement on the picture of Christ which they handed down… then this picture must have been impressed upon their hearts and minds with an incomparable and indelible preciseness rich in content. They themselves tell us this, and later their lives became powerful proof of how completely Christ had filled their minds and hearts.” (Pg. 87-88)

He notes, “the relation of believing Christians to the Bible suffers greatly from an unhealthy frustration. It is this diseased condition in the life of our church that concerns me. The heart of the present controversy is the question of the correctness of the historical and particularly the literary-historical details in the Bible. Yet I am not really worried about the historicity of the events of salvation, nor am I too lazy to go into detail in refuting hypercriticism. Nevertheless, I will not take up my pen for this purpose as long as the present controversy---‘our controversy concerning the Bible’---continues… the arguments and counterarguments … are never conclusive… Even though we cannot agree with the proponents of verbal inspiration but must seek another way of expressing the unchanging relation of Christianity to the Bible, still the decisive issue is not settled by the controversy that rages to and from concerning historical details.” (Pg. 114-115)

He concludes, “As I said before, however, criticism is not my main intention; my purpose in writing is, rather, to set forth the following exposition, which is not merely negative but also affirmative. For my real concern is, after all, the ‘biblical Christ’---and not an ideal Christ nor a Christ of dogma… I deny that the purpose of the Gospels is to serve as documents for a scientifically reconstructed biography of Jesus. They have not posited such a purpose for themselves, nor may the church or theology force upon them as their essential purpose. Their purpose is to awaken faith in Jesus through a clear proclamation of his saving activity. When measured by this purpose I regard them as completely perfect…” (Pg. 126-127)

He adds, “a freedom of movement has been created which enables us to meet the deniers of revelation halfway in order to introduce them wherever possible to the focal point of revelation, and thence to the fulness of historical revelation as well. But this freedom of movement would of course offer little hope of success if it did not proceed from a firm starting point, namely, from a sense of confidence in the normative, unchangeable content of the church’s teaching, namely, in the Bible as a whole; this is a starting point at once historically unassailable, grounded in faith, and independent of scientific scholarship, however much it is the task of scholarship to circumscribe this starting point.” (Pg. 147-148)

Kahler's book is of more interest for Christian THEOLOGY, rather than for those interested in the "historical Jesus."
showtime
Martin Kähler (1835-1912) was a German Protestant theologian, who wrote this short book in 1892. [NOTE: page numbers below refer to a 153-page paperback edition.]

In his Introductory Remarks, he states, “The old but ever-new question … is still very much alive in our own time: ‘What do you think of the Christ?’ [Mt 22:42] This question is seldom coolly dismissed… My theme is a paradox. It places in opposition two statements which might seem to be saying exactly the same thing… I wish to summarize my cry of warning in a form intentionally audacious: the historical Jesus of modern authors conceals from us the living Christ. The Jesus of the ‘Life-of-Jesus movement’ is merely a modern example of human creativity, and not an iota better than the notorious dogmatic Christ of Byzantine Christology. One is as far removed from the real Christ as the other.” (Pg. 42-43)

He asserts, “I regard the entire Life-of-Jesus movement as a blind alley… The Life-of-Jesus movement is completely in the right insofar as it set the Bible against an abstract dogmatism. It becomes illegitimate as soon as it begins to rend and dissect the Bible without having acquired a clear understanding of the special nature of the problem and the peculiar significance of Scripture for such understanding… Hence a person may immerse himself in Jesus’ actions… So he plumbs the depths of Jesus’ consciousness… from his mother’s bosom to his father’s workshop and into the synagogue---and then he is most certainly heading up a blind alley! For the cardinal virtue of genuine historical research is modesty.” (Pg. 46-47)

He observes, “Why, in the final analysis, do we commune with the Jesus of our Gospels? What does he offer us? … Do I really need to know more of him than what Paul delivered to [the Corinthians] as of first importance, that [he] also received, that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared…? … This is the witness and confession of faith which has overcome the world… If I have this I do not need additional information on the precise details of Jesus life and death.” (Pg. 59-60)

But he adds, “Then why the Gospels?... the reason we commune with the Jesus of our Gospels is because it is through them that we learn to know the same Jesus whom… we meet at the right hand of God… he who once walked on earth and is now is exalted … because he is for us God revealed.” (Pg. 60-61)

He explains, “my arguments deal only with those theologians who wish to write a ‘Life of Jesus’ in the service of the confession of Christ, and who think… that their work can do more to strengthen this confession than can dogmatics. I am concerned with a correct evaluation of what the constructive historical method can accomplish, particularly what it can contribute toward the right attitude toward Christ within the Church, the bearer of the gospel.” (Pg. 69)

He suggests, “It is true that at first glance there seems to be a great disparity between the accounts in the Gospels and the ‘dogmatic’ statements about Christ in the Epistles. Yet they are more closely related than at first appears. The Fourth Gospel is an obvious link between the Synoptics and the Epistles…. If, however, we take our Gospels just as they stand, then we find in them the same ‘dogmatic’ character as we find, for example, in the messianic sermons in the book of Acts… For this very reason, until the modern era the church never sensed any disparity between the historical presentation and the dogmatic preaching in the New Testament.” (Pg. 82-83)

He states, “We want to make absolutely clear that ultimately we believe in Christ, not on account of any authority, but because he himself evokes such faith from us. This thought that ‘Christ himself is the originator of the biblical picture of Christ’ is implicit in what was said earlier… If now, with the recognition given to their differences, the first eyewitnesses were nevertheless in agreement on the picture of Christ which they handed down… then this picture must have been impressed upon their hearts and minds with an incomparable and indelible preciseness rich in content. They themselves tell us this, and later their lives became powerful proof of how completely Christ had filled their minds and hearts.” (Pg. 87-88)

He notes, “the relation of believing Christians to the Bible suffers greatly from an unhealthy frustration. It is this diseased condition in the life of our church that concerns me. The heart of the present controversy is the question of the correctness of the historical and particularly the literary-historical details in the Bible. Yet I am not really worried about the historicity of the events of salvation, nor am I too lazy to go into detail in refuting hypercriticism. Nevertheless, I will not take up my pen for this purpose as long as the present controversy---‘our controversy concerning the Bible’---continues… the arguments and counterarguments … are never conclusive… Even though we cannot agree with the proponents of verbal inspiration but must seek another way of expressing the unchanging relation of Christianity to the Bible, still the decisive issue is not settled by the controversy that rages to and from concerning historical details.” (Pg. 114-115)

He concludes, “As I said before, however, criticism is not my main intention; my purpose in writing is, rather, to set forth the following exposition, which is not merely negative but also affirmative. For my real concern is, after all, the ‘biblical Christ’---and not an ideal Christ nor a Christ of dogma… I deny that the purpose of the Gospels is to serve as documents for a scientifically reconstructed biography of Jesus. They have not posited such a purpose for themselves, nor may the church or theology force upon them as their essential purpose. Their purpose is to awaken faith in Jesus through a clear proclamation of his saving activity. When measured by this purpose I regard them as completely perfect…” (Pg. 126-127)

He adds, “a freedom of movement has been created which enables us to meet the deniers of revelation halfway in order to introduce them wherever possible to the focal point of revelation, and thence to the fulness of historical revelation as well. But this freedom of movement would of course offer little hope of success if it did not proceed from a firm starting point, namely, from a sense of confidence in the normative, unchangeable content of the church’s teaching, namely, in the Bible as a whole; this is a starting point at once historically unassailable, grounded in faith, and independent of scientific scholarship, however much it is the task of scholarship to circumscribe this starting point.” (Pg. 147-148)

Kahler's book is of more interest for Christian THEOLOGY, rather than for those interested in the "historical Jesus."