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The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth, and the Nature of Christian Community epub download

by John G. Flett


A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues in conversation with . The Witness of God is a landmark contribution to a fundamental missional theology

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues in conversation with Karl Barth and host of other historical theologians, that the neglect of mission as a theological locus has harmful consequences for understanding both the nature of God's connection with the world and the corresponding nature of the Christian community. The Witness of God is a landmark contribution to a fundamental missional theology. In the twentieth century moves were made to develop an explicit theology of mission to accompany the modern mission movement.

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues that the neglect of mission as a theological locus has harmful consequences for understanding both the nature of God's connection with.

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues that the neglect of mission as a theological locus has harmful consequences for understanding both the nature of God's connection with the world and the corresponding nature of the Christian community. Flett maintains that mission/witness is an integral part of God's being.

The Witness of God book. John G. Flett (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) lectures in intercultural theology and mission studies at Pilgrim Theological College, part of the the University of Divinity in Melbourne, Australia. Originally from New Zealand, Flett has taught in the United States, South Korea, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Germany.

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues in conversation with .

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues in conversation with Karl Barth and host of other histo. Online family Christian book store. Flett maintains that mission/witness is an integral part of God's being, not a secondary characteristic, and contends that the church - if we truly seek to reflect the fullness of God's being - must reflect this truth by becoming a missionary community.

Flett, John G. The Witness of God: the Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth and the Nature of Christian Community. Robertson, Lindsay G. Missio Dei: Karl Barth and the mission of the church. Hill Road 9, no. 2 (2006): 3-19. Rosin, H. H. ‘Missio Dei’: An Examination of the Origin, Contents and Function of the Term in Protestant Missiological Discussion. Scherer, James A. Church, Kingdom and Missio Dei: Lutheran and Orthodox Corrections to Recent Ecumenical Mission Theology.

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues that the neglect of mission as a theological locus has harmful consequences for understanding both the nature of God's connection with the world and the corresponding nature of the Christian.

His books include The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth and the Nature of Christian Community, and Apostolicity: The Ecumenical Question in World Christian Perspective. He has lived and taught in the USA, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, South Korea, Germany, the DRC, and Australia. Follow him on Twitter tJohn.

John G. Flett, The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth, and the Nature of Christian Community. Charles Sturt University, Canberra, ACT 2600, [email protected] Published online by Cambridge University Press: 10 April 2013.

The Witness of God The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth, and the Nature of Christian Community by John G. Flett Download an excerpt. shows God to be the true source of mission and what that means - not just for mission but for theology itself. This is a brilliant and challenging work with which theologians and missiologists alike must reckon. Wilbert R. Shenk (Fuller Graduate School of Intercultural Studies). lt;H1 New Testament Study

A constructive revision of trinitarian missio Dei theology, John Flett's Witness of God argues that the neglect of mission as a theological locus has harmful consequences for understanding both the nature of God's connection with the world and the corresponding nature of the Christian community. Flett maintains that mission/witness is an integral part of God's being, not a secondary characteristic, and contends that the church -- if we truly seek to reflect the fullness of God's being -- must reflect this truth by becoming a missionary community.

The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth, and the Nature of Christian Community epub download

ISBN13: 978-0802864413

ISBN: 0802864414

Author: John G. Flett

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Ministry & Evangelism

Language: English

Publisher: Eerdmans; NEW STIFF WRAPS edition (March 29, 2010)

Pages: 392 pages

ePUB size: 1536 kb

FB2 size: 1320 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 331

Other Formats: lrf docx mbr mobi

Related to The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth, and the Nature of Christian Community ePub books

Nayatol
Flett's accomplishments in this volume are manifold. Among them are the following: demonstrating that "missio Dei" theology is not derived from Barth, that "missio Dei" theology suffers from a poorly conceived understanding of how the Trinity relates to the church - a defect that can be addressed by Barth's theology, and that the allegation that Barth's theology is not enough concerned with mission is hopelessly misguided. It is a profound work that brings fresh power of insight to a topic much too neglected in contemporary theology. You can read more about Flett's book on my blog, "Der Evangelische Theologe."
Nayatol
Flett's accomplishments in this volume are manifold. Among them are the following: demonstrating that "missio Dei" theology is not derived from Barth, that "missio Dei" theology suffers from a poorly conceived understanding of how the Trinity relates to the church - a defect that can be addressed by Barth's theology, and that the allegation that Barth's theology is not enough concerned with mission is hopelessly misguided. It is a profound work that brings fresh power of insight to a topic much too neglected in contemporary theology. You can read more about Flett's book on my blog, "Der Evangelische Theologe."
Biaemi
Modern missions' great push started with William Carey reaching the coastlands of India in the 19th century. Alongside the establishment of the Baptist Mission Society (BMS) in 2nd October 1792, an "evil twin" of mission grew from a church context that was closely enmeshed with the imperial projects of their respective nations. The non-Careyan, ecclesiocentric mission approaches were heavily criticized by host cultures as being partners with colonialist propaganda. This negative tag remains attached to all missions endeavors even until today, long after official colonial programs have ended. As a knowledge base for mission praxis, theology failed to remind the church why the Father sent the Son and the Spirit, why the Son and the Spirit sent the apostles, why the church exists at all. God was portrayed as stopping the work of salvation in the church resulting in castle like walls erected to protect precious assets from the world, rather than sharing them. Further damage was effected to the Church's evangelistic programs when reflected biblically and theologically. One author describes evangelism looking like an occasional lowering of the church castle's drawbridge; Christians would be charging out and taking as many non-Christians as possible to be our prisoners! The Witness of God reminds the church, in a very powerful way, that she exists for the sake of the world, not for the sake of her naval-gazing self.
Also, post-modernism may have dismantled the enlightenment project but posits an "unknowable God," in the form of cultural relativism. Humanity and all of creation is calling out to the "unknown God" like in St. Paul's day. Confusion in the church's language of missio Dei has damaged her message of hope when her witness is really masqueraded propaganda. Barth exposes the limitations of naturalism by modeling the asymmetrical divine and human fellowship: missio Dei is missio ecclesia. "[C]ontrast of the knowledge the community and the terrible ignorance in the world as the motive, and its bridging is the problem of the original Christian mission. The knowledge at stake here is one of universal judgment, not of universal reconciliation. This reality compels mission." (page 60)
However, I feel that the power of this book is somewhat dissipated when readers need to plough through the highly metaphysical discussions. A problem-solving approach would have made the message of the book more easily available to a wider base.
Biaemi
Modern missions' great push started with William Carey reaching the coastlands of India in the 19th century. Alongside the establishment of the Baptist Mission Society (BMS) in 2nd October 1792, an "evil twin" of mission grew from a church context that was closely enmeshed with the imperial projects of their respective nations. The non-Careyan, ecclesiocentric mission approaches were heavily criticized by host cultures as being partners with colonialist propaganda. This negative tag remains attached to all missions endeavors even until today, long after official colonial programs have ended. As a knowledge base for mission praxis, theology failed to remind the church why the Father sent the Son and the Spirit, why the Son and the Spirit sent the apostles, why the church exists at all. God was portrayed as stopping the work of salvation in the church resulting in castle like walls erected to protect precious assets from the world, rather than sharing them. Further damage was effected to the Church's evangelistic programs when reflected biblically and theologically. One author describes evangelism looking like an occasional lowering of the church castle's drawbridge; Christians would be charging out and taking as many non-Christians as possible to be our prisoners! The Witness of God reminds the church, in a very powerful way, that she exists for the sake of the world, not for the sake of her naval-gazing self.
Also, post-modernism may have dismantled the enlightenment project but posits an "unknowable God," in the form of cultural relativism. Humanity and all of creation is calling out to the "unknown God" like in St. Paul's day. Confusion in the church's language of missio Dei has damaged her message of hope when her witness is really masqueraded propaganda. Barth exposes the limitations of naturalism by modeling the asymmetrical divine and human fellowship: missio Dei is missio ecclesia. "[C]ontrast of the knowledge the community and the terrible ignorance in the world as the motive, and its bridging is the problem of the original Christian mission. The knowledge at stake here is one of universal judgment, not of universal reconciliation. This reality compels mission." (page 60)
However, I feel that the power of this book is somewhat dissipated when readers need to plough through the highly metaphysical discussions. A problem-solving approach would have made the message of the book more easily available to a wider base.