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Rain Song epub download

by Alice J. Wisler


Rain Song Books by Alice J. Wisler Rain Song How Sweet It Is ALICE J. WISLER Rain . Cover design by Andrea Gjeldum

Cover design by Andrea Gjeldum. Cover photography by T. Schmidt/Getty Images, Inc.

Nicole Michelin avoids airplanes, motorcycles, and most of all, Japan, where her parents once were missionaries. something of which Nicole knows only bits and pieces. After returning home from teaching English at a refugee camp in the Philippines, Samantha Bravencourt enjoys her quiet life working at her mother's clothing boutique in Falls Church, Virginia. When she receives an invitation to a wedding in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, she looks forward to reconnecting with her college friend.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Nicole Michelin avoids airplanes, motorcycles, and most of all, Japan, where her parents once were missionaries. But she is content with life in little Mount Olive.

About Alice J. Wisler: Born in Osaka, Japan and lived in Japan for 18. .Alice J. Wisler is a public speaker, advocate, fundraiser, and the author of two contemporary novels, How Sweet It Is and Rain Song, a Christy Award finalist. Wisler: Born in Osaka, Japan and lived in Japan for 18 years Went to Kyoto International School and Canadian Academy Majored in Soci.

Wisler, Alice J. I’d like to give her to Monet. Harrison writes that he will certainly try. Of course, he says, you could come to Japan and I’ll take you to Kobe. We can look for the shop together. e at it, we can have lunch at this hole-in-the-wall restaurant that serves the best unagi. It melts in your mouth. In my next message I write that I don’t fly. Some people don’t eat meat. And while we’re on the subject, I am not sure I could eat ee. Some think it’s a sin to read your horoscope.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Nicole Michelin avoids airplanes, motorcycles, and most of all, Japan, where her parents once were missionaries. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Not By Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution. Peter J. Richerson, Robert Boyd.

by. Wisler, Alice J. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Where is the rest of the book? . ) Rain Song is sold at many bookstores. So is my second novel, How Sweet It Is.

Where is the rest of the book? Susanna.

Alice J. Wisler, Durham, N. Yesterday at 05:39 ·. Day Before Thanksgiving thoughts.

Yesterday at 05:39 ·. Can we look at some of the negatives in our lives and see beyond the usual way of thinking about them. to possible positives? Alice J. Wisler. 26 November at 11:05 ·. Cooking with Author Leanna Sain!

Nicole Michelin avoids airplanes, motorcycles, and most of all, Japan, where her parents once were missionaries. Something happened in Japan...something that sent Nicole and her father back to America alone...something of which Nicole knows only bits and pieces. But she is content with life in little Mount Olive, North Carolina, with her quirky relatives, tank of lively fish, and plenty of homemade pineapple chutney. Through her online column for the Pretty Fishy Web site, she meets Harrison Michaels, who, much to her dismay, lives in Japan. She attempts to avoid him, but his e-mails tug at her heart. Then Harrison reveals that he knew her as a child in Japan. In fact, he knows more about her childhood than she does...

Rain Song epub download

ISBN13: 978-0764204777

ISBN: 0764204777

Author: Alice J. Wisler

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Bethany House Publishers; 1st edition (October 1, 2008)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB size: 1713 kb

FB2 size: 1780 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 333

Other Formats: lrf lit rtf mbr

Related to Rain Song ePub books

Owomed
I found this book on my Kindle after my daughter had borrowed the Kindle, so, I read it. Well, almost read it. The premise was interesting: a 31 year old single woman starts an email "relationship" with a person in Japan. OK. Now what? Well, then we find out this 31 year old is afraid of almost everything! No flying, no eating unusual items, resorts to reading emails in the janitor's closet at the school where she teaches (really?)...well, I could go on, but reading about someone's case of arrested development just couldn't hold my interest. Haven't finished it. There was one review that said it's a book to read when you want to make sure you'll fall asleep. I agree. Hope my daughter didn't pay for this book, for in paper form, it wouldn't be worth the paper it was printed on.
Owomed
I found this book on my Kindle after my daughter had borrowed the Kindle, so, I read it. Well, almost read it. The premise was interesting: a 31 year old single woman starts an email "relationship" with a person in Japan. OK. Now what? Well, then we find out this 31 year old is afraid of almost everything! No flying, no eating unusual items, resorts to reading emails in the janitor's closet at the school where she teaches (really?)...well, I could go on, but reading about someone's case of arrested development just couldn't hold my interest. Haven't finished it. There was one review that said it's a book to read when you want to make sure you'll fall asleep. I agree. Hope my daughter didn't pay for this book, for in paper form, it wouldn't be worth the paper it was printed on.
Felolak
I started reading Rain Song by Alice J. Wisler at the end of July (I know I'm running late with the review :/). For some reason that I can't quite put my finger on it took me a while to read this one. Maybe because I was on vacation or that I only downloaded it on my Cloud Reader and not the Kindle app on my phone (I read most books on my phone now). But whatever the reason, it rarely takes me so long to read a book so that must say something about this one.

I one clicked it from Amazon when it was free because I can't resist a freebie. I hadn't heard of neither the author or book before. I was scrolling through my Cloud Reader and picked this one in particular because I liked the cover very much. At first I was confused....Nicole is in Mount Olive with Ducee and Iva, but she's constantly thinking about something that happened in Japan. At one point I couldn't follow. I was like: Where did Japan come from now? Little by little it became clearer. Once I got to the middle it was easier to follow what was going on. However, the ending still left many questions unanswered for me. I think there should be a sequel or some sort of explanation. I might sound like Sheldon Cooper now, but I do need closure.

Rain Song is not a story about rain. The rain is a metaphor. It's a story about how a young woman slowly learns how to overcome her fears and ends up doing/facing all the things she was afraid of.

Rating - I admit it got me thinking and guessing. In the end I guessed right. And you know I don't like it when I can guess the plot of a book. Plus it took me soooo long to finish it. 2 stars for this one.

Who would I recommend it too - Well, I won't give recommendations this time since I gave it only 2 stars.
Felolak
I started reading Rain Song by Alice J. Wisler at the end of July (I know I'm running late with the review :/). For some reason that I can't quite put my finger on it took me a while to read this one. Maybe because I was on vacation or that I only downloaded it on my Cloud Reader and not the Kindle app on my phone (I read most books on my phone now). But whatever the reason, it rarely takes me so long to read a book so that must say something about this one.

I one clicked it from Amazon when it was free because I can't resist a freebie. I hadn't heard of neither the author or book before. I was scrolling through my Cloud Reader and picked this one in particular because I liked the cover very much. At first I was confused....Nicole is in Mount Olive with Ducee and Iva, but she's constantly thinking about something that happened in Japan. At one point I couldn't follow. I was like: Where did Japan come from now? Little by little it became clearer. Once I got to the middle it was easier to follow what was going on. However, the ending still left many questions unanswered for me. I think there should be a sequel or some sort of explanation. I might sound like Sheldon Cooper now, but I do need closure.

Rain Song is not a story about rain. The rain is a metaphor. It's a story about how a young woman slowly learns how to overcome her fears and ends up doing/facing all the things she was afraid of.

Rating - I admit it got me thinking and guessing. In the end I guessed right. And you know I don't like it when I can guess the plot of a book. Plus it took me soooo long to finish it. 2 stars for this one.

Who would I recommend it too - Well, I won't give recommendations this time since I gave it only 2 stars.
Zuser
Rain Song by Alice J. Wisler is a warm family story. Set in Mount Olive, North Carolina--think pickles--it's about the close McCormick family. It's complete with a lovely matriarch who sticks religiously to her traditions, her sister, a few complicated people and infidelities, and some typically Southern food and charm. Nicole lost her mother in a house fire when she was two, and she was reared by her grandmother and loved by her aunts and the whole family. Her father couldn't handle his wife's death and descended into drink and despondency. Nicole meets someone online while discussing fish, and the friendship grows. Soon, she is asking questions she never thought she'd ask and finding out some of the facts of her early childhood.

It wasn't the plot that was intriguing about this book. It's fairly straightforward with a few surprises. But the style . . . . All I can say is that I love Mrs. Wisler's style! It's folksy and fresh, first person. The motifs of pineapple chutney, cucumber sandwiches, Japan, a special doll, and fish are woven throughout the book so that it all has an extra meaning and cohesiveness. The child Monet, who has obvious physical issues and great artistic talent--how often the two go hand-in-hand--gives the reader a release from the intense emotions we feel from Nicole, her aunt Iva, and cousin Grable.

Nicole finds many answers about her mother, father, the lady who saved her life, and eventually, she moves on to trust and love.

Excellent! I look forward to reading more of Mrs. Wisler's books from this series, "Heart of Carolina."
Zuser
Rain Song by Alice J. Wisler is a warm family story. Set in Mount Olive, North Carolina--think pickles--it's about the close McCormick family. It's complete with a lovely matriarch who sticks religiously to her traditions, her sister, a few complicated people and infidelities, and some typically Southern food and charm. Nicole lost her mother in a house fire when she was two, and she was reared by her grandmother and loved by her aunts and the whole family. Her father couldn't handle his wife's death and descended into drink and despondency. Nicole meets someone online while discussing fish, and the friendship grows. Soon, she is asking questions she never thought she'd ask and finding out some of the facts of her early childhood.

It wasn't the plot that was intriguing about this book. It's fairly straightforward with a few surprises. But the style . . . . All I can say is that I love Mrs. Wisler's style! It's folksy and fresh, first person. The motifs of pineapple chutney, cucumber sandwiches, Japan, a special doll, and fish are woven throughout the book so that it all has an extra meaning and cohesiveness. The child Monet, who has obvious physical issues and great artistic talent--how often the two go hand-in-hand--gives the reader a release from the intense emotions we feel from Nicole, her aunt Iva, and cousin Grable.

Nicole finds many answers about her mother, father, the lady who saved her life, and eventually, she moves on to trust and love.

Excellent! I look forward to reading more of Mrs. Wisler's books from this series, "Heart of Carolina."
Rageseeker
Alice Wisler, a Christian author and grief workshop leader, has written a book about, not only facing your fears, but fitting the pieces of your past together despite the lack of help from a mentally disturbed remaining parent. It is a fortunate moment when East meets West on a web site and Nicole gets a chance to inquire about her early childhood, one fraught with fears and faint memories of her departed mother. Harrison becomes a pen pal with more than fish in common with Nicole--they share an early childhood in Japan and both had Christian missionary parents who were close friends on the mission field.

As Nicole deals with her extended family's issues in a small North Carolina town, she begins to see possibilities in a romance with Harrison. But only if she can overcome her fear of flying to go back to her land of birth, Japan, and feel at ease about leaving the only real mother she ever had--her maternal grandmother. Just as Nicole is about to "lift off", her grandmother has a serious heart attack. Our heroine battles with cancelling her flight plans, but her wise and wonderfully spirited grandmother gives her precious advice.

Read Rain Song to find out what this advice was and fully understand where this title was spawned. There is a timing flaw in getting her pet fish managed for her absence during her trip, but overall, the book is written with sensitivity for a shy and middle-aging single female. I like the self-talk that goes on inside Nicole's mind throughout the book. It adds some light moments to what could be a pretty gruesome task of digging up a tragic past.
Rageseeker
Alice Wisler, a Christian author and grief workshop leader, has written a book about, not only facing your fears, but fitting the pieces of your past together despite the lack of help from a mentally disturbed remaining parent. It is a fortunate moment when East meets West on a web site and Nicole gets a chance to inquire about her early childhood, one fraught with fears and faint memories of her departed mother. Harrison becomes a pen pal with more than fish in common with Nicole--they share an early childhood in Japan and both had Christian missionary parents who were close friends on the mission field.

As Nicole deals with her extended family's issues in a small North Carolina town, she begins to see possibilities in a romance with Harrison. But only if she can overcome her fear of flying to go back to her land of birth, Japan, and feel at ease about leaving the only real mother she ever had--her maternal grandmother. Just as Nicole is about to "lift off", her grandmother has a serious heart attack. Our heroine battles with cancelling her flight plans, but her wise and wonderfully spirited grandmother gives her precious advice.

Read Rain Song to find out what this advice was and fully understand where this title was spawned. There is a timing flaw in getting her pet fish managed for her absence during her trip, but overall, the book is written with sensitivity for a shy and middle-aging single female. I like the self-talk that goes on inside Nicole's mind throughout the book. It adds some light moments to what could be a pretty gruesome task of digging up a tragic past.