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The Epistle to the Romans epub download

by Edwyn C Hoskyns,Karl Barth


I read it partly out of historical curiosity and partly to get a handle on Barthian theology, which I learned was nearly as pivotal to modern (progressive) evangelical scholarship as Aquinas was to Catholic theology.

Barth-who remains a powerful influence on European and American theology-argues that the modern Christian preacher and theologian face the same basic problems that confronted Paul

Barth-who remains a powerful influence on European and American theology-argues that the modern Christian preacher and theologian face the same basic problems that confronted Paul.

Barth was a pastor in Safenwil at the time.

German original originally published 1918. Biographical note": . .Includes bibliographical references and indexes.Donor Challenge: Help us reach our goal! To the Internet Archive Community, Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today.

a b c d e Wakefield 2004. Download as PDF. Printable version.

tion ^ a b c d e Wakefield 2004. "Heroes of the Faith: Sir Edwyn Hoskyns, 1884–1937" (PDF). London: Church Union. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 July 2011. Retrieved 1 May 2019.

Barth-who remains a powerful influence on European and American theology-argues that the modern Christian preacher and theologian face the same . Sir Edwyn Clement Hoskyns, With a Preface by the Author E C Hoskyns.

Barth-who remains a powerful influence on European and American theology-argues that the modern Christian preacher and theologian face the same basic problems that confronted Paul. Assessing the whole Protestant argument in relation to modern attitudes and problems, he focuses on topics such as Biblical exegesis; the interrelationship between theology, the Church, and religious experience; the relevance of the truth of the Bible to culture; and what preachers should preach.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. % restored. Barth-who remains a powerful influence on European and American theology-argues that the modern Christian preacher and theologian face the same basic problems that confronted Paul.

Karl Barth, E. C. Hoskyns. Named one of Church Times's Best Christian Books. Barth-who remains a powerful influence on European and American theology-argues that the modern Christian preacher and theologian face the same basic problems that confronted Paul

2. Das Wort Gottes und die Theologie, 1925.

The Epistle to the Romans epub download

ISBN13: 978-0192135063

ISBN: 0192135066

Author: Edwyn C Hoskyns,Karl Barth

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Christian Living

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press; 6th edition (1933)

Pages: 548 pages

ePUB size: 1378 kb

FB2 size: 1399 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 858

Other Formats: txt mbr lrf txt

Related to The Epistle to the Romans ePub books

Tolrajas
Karl Barth's Romans commentary was an important book that helped reverse the tide of liberal Protestantism in the 20th century. I read it partly out of historical curiosity and partly to get a handle on Barthian theology, which I learned was nearly as pivotal to modern (progressive) evangelical scholarship as Aquinas was to Catholic theology.

As with most of the reviewers here, I found the reading tough and had to make a few attempts to really get into it. Barth in his preface to the 2nd edition actually spent nearly one whole page defending the abstruseness of his writing against critics who charged him for being overly bombastic! Somehow I felt strangely comforted by both the critique and his defense : while simplicity is good, oversimplification falsifies.

I found that one of the keys to understanding Barth is his 'theology from above' approach. He repeatedly invokes the Kierkegaardian insight of the 'infinite qualitative distinction' between God and man as a lens to understanding spiritual perception. It is by faith and faith alone that one can properly apprehend spiritual reality. One does not work his way up the mountain of theology by his (unaided)intellectual effort or religious piety. Instead, it is through a supernatural encounter with God that the gospel can be grasped in all its mystery (think of the paradox of the Incarnation for example or the mystery of the atonement)

Barth does not seem to condescend to unbelievers by appealing to reason or experience since human will and perceptions are essentially fallen but bases his epistemology almost exclusively on divine election/revelation. In this regard, he stands squarely within the Reformed tradition which holds a high view of divine grace, leaving no ground for human boasting.

The letter to the Romans had been used historically as a revolutionary tool against the pelagian heresy and medieval Catholicism. It is amazing to see how Barth uses it against liberal Christianity, which basically reduces the gospel to anthropology and a civil religion. Barth's 'theology from above' approach basically calls us back to the transcendent nature of the Christian faith, 'which no eyes have seen or the ears heard'.

Barth writes with great passion and unapologetic fervor. One does not read this commentary with a cool head as one would read an exegetical work replete with lexical treatment and historical reconstruction. Rather Barth writes as if he is preaching, bringing the letter of Paul alive to his readers with great urgency. One has to keep pace with the rhetoric to get it, like riding a bicycle (keep pedaling to avoid falling off !), even when one is tempted to pause to consider a ponderous turn of phrase.

I finished it in a couple of days and will likely go back again and again, to soak in this theological tour de force for a deeper grasp of Barth's ideas and passion. Not your average devotional reading but one that can deepen and enrich our reading of Romans as well as Barthian theology.
Tolrajas
Karl Barth's Romans commentary was an important book that helped reverse the tide of liberal Protestantism in the 20th century. I read it partly out of historical curiosity and partly to get a handle on Barthian theology, which I learned was nearly as pivotal to modern (progressive) evangelical scholarship as Aquinas was to Catholic theology.

As with most of the reviewers here, I found the reading tough and had to make a few attempts to really get into it. Barth in his preface to the 2nd edition actually spent nearly one whole page defending the abstruseness of his writing against critics who charged him for being overly bombastic! Somehow I felt strangely comforted by both the critique and his defense : while simplicity is good, oversimplification falsifies.

I found that one of the keys to understanding Barth is his 'theology from above' approach. He repeatedly invokes the Kierkegaardian insight of the 'infinite qualitative distinction' between God and man as a lens to understanding spiritual perception. It is by faith and faith alone that one can properly apprehend spiritual reality. One does not work his way up the mountain of theology by his (unaided)intellectual effort or religious piety. Instead, it is through a supernatural encounter with God that the gospel can be grasped in all its mystery (think of the paradox of the Incarnation for example or the mystery of the atonement)

Barth does not seem to condescend to unbelievers by appealing to reason or experience since human will and perceptions are essentially fallen but bases his epistemology almost exclusively on divine election/revelation. In this regard, he stands squarely within the Reformed tradition which holds a high view of divine grace, leaving no ground for human boasting.

The letter to the Romans had been used historically as a revolutionary tool against the pelagian heresy and medieval Catholicism. It is amazing to see how Barth uses it against liberal Christianity, which basically reduces the gospel to anthropology and a civil religion. Barth's 'theology from above' approach basically calls us back to the transcendent nature of the Christian faith, 'which no eyes have seen or the ears heard'.

Barth writes with great passion and unapologetic fervor. One does not read this commentary with a cool head as one would read an exegetical work replete with lexical treatment and historical reconstruction. Rather Barth writes as if he is preaching, bringing the letter of Paul alive to his readers with great urgency. One has to keep pace with the rhetoric to get it, like riding a bicycle (keep pedaling to avoid falling off !), even when one is tempted to pause to consider a ponderous turn of phrase.

I finished it in a couple of days and will likely go back again and again, to soak in this theological tour de force for a deeper grasp of Barth's ideas and passion. Not your average devotional reading but one that can deepen and enrich our reading of Romans as well as Barthian theology.
Tejora
If I were reviewing the book itself, I would give it 5+ stars, but this edition does have a few drawbacks for research use. The pagination is only by Kindle location, which is annoying if you're trying to keep track of citations. It's relatively easy, though still time-consuming, to work backwards from the chapter and verse heading and find the page number in the Oxford version. Also, the e-book print occasionally has random line breaks or interruptions where none should exist. These are minor issues, however, compared to finally having a searchable version of this very important text.
Tejora
If I were reviewing the book itself, I would give it 5+ stars, but this edition does have a few drawbacks for research use. The pagination is only by Kindle location, which is annoying if you're trying to keep track of citations. It's relatively easy, though still time-consuming, to work backwards from the chapter and verse heading and find the page number in the Oxford version. Also, the e-book print occasionally has random line breaks or interruptions where none should exist. These are minor issues, however, compared to finally having a searchable version of this very important text.
MilsoN
I am doing what I call a "close reading" of this work, meaning that I take notes as a way of focusing on the main points of each section and understanding those points before moving on. It is tedious but rewarding. This study has become an existential experience for me. Barth's dialectical method is both intellectually challenging and spiritually enriching. I hope Barth's Romans becomes rediscovered broadly in our own generation as its importance is in no way diminished by time.
MilsoN
I am doing what I call a "close reading" of this work, meaning that I take notes as a way of focusing on the main points of each section and understanding those points before moving on. It is tedious but rewarding. This study has become an existential experience for me. Barth's dialectical method is both intellectually challenging and spiritually enriching. I hope Barth's Romans becomes rediscovered broadly in our own generation as its importance is in no way diminished by time.
Malodora
Karl Barth's first work which shattered the complacency and optimism of liberal Protestantism. All our hopes and dreams and works and plans and religious deeds come up against the finality of God's "No." Only then can we hear the gospel of grace. This is a foundational work for 20th century theology -- and needs to be rediscovered in the 21st century, to voice a loud and final "No" to both the liberal experiment which has disconnected itself from divine revelation, and to the fundamentalists and prosperity preachers who use religion as a path to political power and personal wealth.
Malodora
Karl Barth's first work which shattered the complacency and optimism of liberal Protestantism. All our hopes and dreams and works and plans and religious deeds come up against the finality of God's "No." Only then can we hear the gospel of grace. This is a foundational work for 20th century theology -- and needs to be rediscovered in the 21st century, to voice a loud and final "No" to both the liberal experiment which has disconnected itself from divine revelation, and to the fundamentalists and prosperity preachers who use religion as a path to political power and personal wealth.
Iaran
If Paul had lived in the XXth Century, wouldn't wrote something too much different from Barth. This is not a literal interpretation, but an existential and dialectical one. But let me put some examples of some key words for you to see Barth's scope:
The Jews are the believers. Accordingly, all of us, even Christians, as the believers of XXth century, may be labeled as "Jews".
The Law is the Religion, that is, the literality of religion: written texts, cults, devotions, etc. When you read "through the law we know what sin is", you have to understand: "through religion -that is Christianity of XXth century kind - we know what sin is".
Circumsicion is Sacrament. When we read "did God accept Abraham before or after circumcision?"; we have to see: "did God accept Abraham after or before any Sacrament?".
The works of the Law are the works of Religion: masses, prayers, etc.
Sin: all the things human beings do, think or intend without reference to God. For example: Democracy, Comunism, Economics, etc. When we read: "God enclosed everyone under sin in order God may be exalted", it does mean: all human work is corruption, even religion, as far it is a human elaboration about God.
God's Wrath: all human work. God's justice: all human work already condemned. But, as God is the one who makes possible the impossible, and only because of that, God's work.
God's work or Grace: all the things already condemned by sin or human efforts. However, as they stand already condemned because all human do is evil and sin, they are, nevertheless, made rigtheous by the Grace of God.
The Grace of God is the relation which is no relation, the intellection which is no intellection, the voice which is no voice, pronounced in words which are not audible, upon men. To this only Faith matches. God's action is God's Grace. God, as the Creator, the Infinitum, as He who any eye has seen, is the Invisible. His relation to man is the lack of relation, the Invisible bound which is not any tangible thing. In a sense, God does not exist. And, however, He is the Hope, Life and Salvation expressed through Faith. The problem is when such a friendship or conviction has to be expressed in human words and works. Then we don't have God Himself, but a speech about God, which is Religion. Then we come to the God of this world, the God of the Law and the Works which only reveals sin. But when such a speech or work -Religion- shows its vacuity, because it is also full of sin as all other human doings; then we are in disposition to enter into relationship with the True God.
Not for people who is sleeping in their faith, but for those who don't take scandal on Jesus, so they are blessed.
Iaran
If Paul had lived in the XXth Century, wouldn't wrote something too much different from Barth. This is not a literal interpretation, but an existential and dialectical one. But let me put some examples of some key words for you to see Barth's scope:
The Jews are the believers. Accordingly, all of us, even Christians, as the believers of XXth century, may be labeled as "Jews".
The Law is the Religion, that is, the literality of religion: written texts, cults, devotions, etc. When you read "through the law we know what sin is", you have to understand: "through religion -that is Christianity of XXth century kind - we know what sin is".
Circumsicion is Sacrament. When we read "did God accept Abraham before or after circumcision?"; we have to see: "did God accept Abraham after or before any Sacrament?".
The works of the Law are the works of Religion: masses, prayers, etc.
Sin: all the things human beings do, think or intend without reference to God. For example: Democracy, Comunism, Economics, etc. When we read: "God enclosed everyone under sin in order God may be exalted", it does mean: all human work is corruption, even religion, as far it is a human elaboration about God.
God's Wrath: all human work. God's justice: all human work already condemned. But, as God is the one who makes possible the impossible, and only because of that, God's work.
God's work or Grace: all the things already condemned by sin or human efforts. However, as they stand already condemned because all human do is evil and sin, they are, nevertheless, made rigtheous by the Grace of God.
The Grace of God is the relation which is no relation, the intellection which is no intellection, the voice which is no voice, pronounced in words which are not audible, upon men. To this only Faith matches. God's action is God's Grace. God, as the Creator, the Infinitum, as He who any eye has seen, is the Invisible. His relation to man is the lack of relation, the Invisible bound which is not any tangible thing. In a sense, God does not exist. And, however, He is the Hope, Life and Salvation expressed through Faith. The problem is when such a friendship or conviction has to be expressed in human words and works. Then we don't have God Himself, but a speech about God, which is Religion. Then we come to the God of this world, the God of the Law and the Works which only reveals sin. But when such a speech or work -Religion- shows its vacuity, because it is also full of sin as all other human doings; then we are in disposition to enter into relationship with the True God.
Not for people who is sleeping in their faith, but for those who don't take scandal on Jesus, so they are blessed.