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Luke 1:1- 9:50 (Concordia Commentary) epub download

by Arthur A. Just Jr.


Arthur Just is a professor at Concordia Theological Seminary (Fort Wayne .

Dr. Arthur Just develops four central themes in Luke: Christology, sacramentology, ecclesiology, and eschatology.

by Arthur Just Dr. Arthur A. Just Jr. is professor of exegetical theology and dean of the chapel at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Luke 1:1-9:50 Arthur A. Just.

Luke 1:1-9 : A Theological Exposition of Sacred Scripture.

Arthur Just of Concordia Theological Seminary-Ft.

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Multiple volumes for a single book are combined. 9/1/15 Update: Several volumes have been added/revised.

About This Volume: Luke wrote his Gospel to provide a trustworthy historical record of Jesus Christ. From the start Luke s Gospel is catechetical: it teaches the facts of Jesus ministry for the purpose of instilling saving faith and strengthening the knowledge and appreciation of how Christ continues to redeem sinners through the ministry of Word and Sacrament. Dr. Arthur Just develops four central themes in Luke: Christology, sacramentology, ecclesiology, and eschatology. In addition to exploring what Luke s narrative states, Just also asks how the narrative would have been appropriated by Luke s first readers, and how it contributes to the church s faith and worship today. The same Christ who became incarnate and was born of the Virgin Mary is present today with his gifts of grace, conferred through Holy Baptism, the hearing of God s Word, and the Lord s Supper. This commentary s literary technique is based on a careful examination of the original Greek text. It reveals the intricate structure of Luke s Gospel and how that structure contributes to its message. The commentary includes outlines of each pericope that facilitate preaching and teaching the text. At appropriate junctures, Just provides extensive discussions of vital themes in the text, such as Baptism in Luke-Acts; Luke s prophet Christology; Jesus table fellowship, the Passover, and the Lord s Supper; the Lukan Beatitudes; Luke s travel narrative, in which Christ journeys to the cross and open tomb; and Luke s use of the Old Testament to witness to Christ. About the Series: The Concordia Commentary Series: A Theological Exposition of Sacred Scripture is written to enable pastors and teachers of the Word to proclaim the Gospel with greater insight, clarity, and faithfulness to the divine intent of the biblical text. This landmark work will cover all the canonical books of the Old and New Testaments, interpreting Scripture as a harmonious unity centered in the person and work of Jesus Christ. Every passage bears witness to the Good News that God has reconciled the world to Himself through our Lord's life, death, and resurrection. The commentary fully affirms the divine inspiration, inerrancy, and authority of Scripture as it emphasizes "that which promotes Christ" in each pericope. Authors are sensitive to the rich treasury of language, imagery, and themes found throughout Scripture, including such dialectics as Law and Gospel, sin and grace, death and new life, folly and wisdom, demon possession and the arrival of the kingdom of God in Christ. Careful attention is given to the original Hebrew, Aramaic, or Greek. Further light is shed on the text from archaeology, history, and extra-biblical literature. Finally, Scripture's message is applied to the ongoing life of the church in terms of ministry, worship, proclamation of the Word, Baptism, the Lord's Supper, confession of the faith--all in joyful anticipation of the life of the world to come.

Luke 1:1- 9:50  (Concordia Commentary) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0570042549

ISBN: 0570042542

Author: Arthur A. Just Jr.

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Concordia Publishing (January 1, 1997)

Pages: 416 pages

ePUB size: 1345 kb

FB2 size: 1285 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 888

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Related to Luke 1:1- 9:50 (Concordia Commentary) ePub books

Miromice
Arthur Just is a professor at Concordia Theological Seminary (Fort Wayne, Indiana) and teaches courses in exegesis, liturgics, homiletics, and pastoral theology. Luke 1:1-9:50 is the first of a two-volume set in the Concordia Commentary series.

Just approaches and examines the Gospel of Luke from a number of theological perspectives. He maintains an orthodox belief in Lukan authorship, not a series of "redactors" or a "Lukan community." He cites his belief that the text is primarily theological in nature (thus concerning itself not necessarily with historical fact, but with the identity and work of Jesus). Luke (along with every other book of the Bible) is Christological in nature and thus the eyewitness accounts of the person and work of Jesus are connected with Old Testament Messianic prophesies. Just believes that Luke is concerned with the Sacraments (Baptism and Holy Communion) and frequently shows where Luke provides sacramental teachings. Luke is concerned with eschatology--the end-times and the second coming of Christ. And, finally, Luke was exceedingly concerned with Catechesis--communicating Christ-centered doctrine in a manner conducive to memorization.

This last point is one of the most unique aspects of this commentary. Considering the great expense associated with producing or hand-copying a book, also considering the low literacy rate of the First Century Roman world, Just argues that most Christians would not be readers of the word, but hearers of the word. He is thus on the lookout for mnemonic devices such as alliteration, chiasm, juxtaposition, inclusio, and the like. He is also attuned to the Greek vocabulary, arguing that Luke will use certain words or phrases to signal to the hearer that they are to view a story/city/person in a particular way. Just also assumes a familiarity with the Old Testament, and thus assumes that at least a portion of the original hearers of this Gospel would be Jewish

This volume covers the text of the Gospel of Luke from its opening verses to the point where Jesus sets his face toward Jerusalem (the "Travel Narrative" or "Journey to Jerusalem"). Just includes an exceptionally well-written Introduction where he clearly lays out his theological perspective and scholarly methodology when approaching the text. Just provides his own translation, provides textual notes that rely on the Greek, and provides general comments on the historical/theological import of Luke's various pericopes. Excurses include "The Infancy Narrative," "Baptism in Luke-Acts," "Luke's Prophet Christology," "The Opponents of Jesus in Luke," "Jesus' Table Fellowship," and "The Lukan Beatitudes."

This reviewer has high regard for this volume. Just's comments are definitely not "run of the mill." Instead, his treatment of the text as both historical (giving us insight into the past) and also theological (still living, active, and influencing believers) produces a commentary that is both "ivory tower" and devotional. Several times during reading this commentary, the light bulb went on and I was able to view a familiar text in a new way. It is certainly a commentary I will turn to when preparing Bible studies and sermons.

The editors formatted the book well. The pages are clean and orderly; footnotes are provided; and a unique feature of the series is that Icons are provided in the margins when the author covers a certain topic. For example, when Just shows how a periscope relates to the Church, there is a "Church Icon" in the margin; when Just shows how a pericope relates to Baptism, a "Baptism Icon" is supplied.

The text assumes a theological background, one that especially includes the study of Hebrew and (especially) Greek. Just's commentary is strongest when he comments on Jesus actions (healing, exorcizing, eating), but not as strong when he comments on Jesus' teachings (e.g. Sermon on the Plain). In all, a unique contribution to Lukan study and a highly recommended resource for pastors.
Miromice
Arthur Just is a professor at Concordia Theological Seminary (Fort Wayne, Indiana) and teaches courses in exegesis, liturgics, homiletics, and pastoral theology. Luke 1:1-9:50 is the first of a two-volume set in the Concordia Commentary series.

Just approaches and examines the Gospel of Luke from a number of theological perspectives. He maintains an orthodox belief in Lukan authorship, not a series of "redactors" or a "Lukan community." He cites his belief that the text is primarily theological in nature (thus concerning itself not necessarily with historical fact, but with the identity and work of Jesus). Luke (along with every other book of the Bible) is Christological in nature and thus the eyewitness accounts of the person and work of Jesus are connected with Old Testament Messianic prophesies. Just believes that Luke is concerned with the Sacraments (Baptism and Holy Communion) and frequently shows where Luke provides sacramental teachings. Luke is concerned with eschatology--the end-times and the second coming of Christ. And, finally, Luke was exceedingly concerned with Catechesis--communicating Christ-centered doctrine in a manner conducive to memorization.

This last point is one of the most unique aspects of this commentary. Considering the great expense associated with producing or hand-copying a book, also considering the low literacy rate of the First Century Roman world, Just argues that most Christians would not be readers of the word, but hearers of the word. He is thus on the lookout for mnemonic devices such as alliteration, chiasm, juxtaposition, inclusio, and the like. He is also attuned to the Greek vocabulary, arguing that Luke will use certain words or phrases to signal to the hearer that they are to view a story/city/person in a particular way. Just also assumes a familiarity with the Old Testament, and thus assumes that at least a portion of the original hearers of this Gospel would be Jewish

This volume covers the text of the Gospel of Luke from its opening verses to the point where Jesus sets his face toward Jerusalem (the "Travel Narrative" or "Journey to Jerusalem"). Just includes an exceptionally well-written Introduction where he clearly lays out his theological perspective and scholarly methodology when approaching the text. Just provides his own translation, provides textual notes that rely on the Greek, and provides general comments on the historical/theological import of Luke's various pericopes. Excurses include "The Infancy Narrative," "Baptism in Luke-Acts," "Luke's Prophet Christology," "The Opponents of Jesus in Luke," "Jesus' Table Fellowship," and "The Lukan Beatitudes."

This reviewer has high regard for this volume. Just's comments are definitely not "run of the mill." Instead, his treatment of the text as both historical (giving us insight into the past) and also theological (still living, active, and influencing believers) produces a commentary that is both "ivory tower" and devotional. Several times during reading this commentary, the light bulb went on and I was able to view a familiar text in a new way. It is certainly a commentary I will turn to when preparing Bible studies and sermons.

The editors formatted the book well. The pages are clean and orderly; footnotes are provided; and a unique feature of the series is that Icons are provided in the margins when the author covers a certain topic. For example, when Just shows how a periscope relates to the Church, there is a "Church Icon" in the margin; when Just shows how a pericope relates to Baptism, a "Baptism Icon" is supplied.

The text assumes a theological background, one that especially includes the study of Hebrew and (especially) Greek. Just's commentary is strongest when he comments on Jesus actions (healing, exorcizing, eating), but not as strong when he comments on Jesus' teachings (e.g. Sermon on the Plain). In all, a unique contribution to Lukan study and a highly recommended resource for pastors.
Slowly writer
Dr. Just's two-volume work on Luke's Gospel will bless the Christian community by showing the incarnational/sacramental theology of the text.
Just does this in two major steps, the first being his own Greek translation followed by key Greek word(s) and phrases and their meanings, grammatical studies, etc. which will clearly benefit clergy and informed lay people. Second, in the commentary section he clearly sets forward the meaning of the text in light of the historical understanding and recent scholastic views.
This is a marvelously useful set to guide the Christian who wants the most out of Luke. He will find Christ here on every page.
Slowly writer
Dr. Just's two-volume work on Luke's Gospel will bless the Christian community by showing the incarnational/sacramental theology of the text.
Just does this in two major steps, the first being his own Greek translation followed by key Greek word(s) and phrases and their meanings, grammatical studies, etc. which will clearly benefit clergy and informed lay people. Second, in the commentary section he clearly sets forward the meaning of the text in light of the historical understanding and recent scholastic views.
This is a marvelously useful set to guide the Christian who wants the most out of Luke. He will find Christ here on every page.
happy light
Whenever I start any of Dr. Just's books I think the man is brilliant. While this is probably true, it seems that he must get paid by the page. This volume, as well as his other volume, of his commentary on the Gospel of Luke could have used an editor. He states the same thought repeatedly (many times on the same page), only occasionally in different ways. I'm happy I took a speed reading course in community college so I could skim the pages for the saliant points Dr. Just does make.

Dr. Just shines when he shows the multi-layered chiastic nature of Luke's Gospel.

Dr. Just's two volumes of Luke could easily have been condensed into a wonderfully managable one volume commentary. I haven't purchased any of the other Concordia Commentary series volumes due to my fear that CPH editors see the physical weight and size of a book as being the number one reason for asking $50.00/volume (more volumes, more money).

I view books as I do meat. One pound of filet mignon is so much more valuable (and tasty) than ten pounds of chuck roast. Sure there's good red meat in both, but what to do with all the fat of the latter. Kretzmann's commentary on Luke is so much more valuable than Just's two-volume commentary. While you may want to have both, you must weigh the cost.
happy light
Whenever I start any of Dr. Just's books I think the man is brilliant. While this is probably true, it seems that he must get paid by the page. This volume, as well as his other volume, of his commentary on the Gospel of Luke could have used an editor. He states the same thought repeatedly (many times on the same page), only occasionally in different ways. I'm happy I took a speed reading course in community college so I could skim the pages for the saliant points Dr. Just does make.

Dr. Just shines when he shows the multi-layered chiastic nature of Luke's Gospel.

Dr. Just's two volumes of Luke could easily have been condensed into a wonderfully managable one volume commentary. I haven't purchased any of the other Concordia Commentary series volumes due to my fear that CPH editors see the physical weight and size of a book as being the number one reason for asking $50.00/volume (more volumes, more money).

I view books as I do meat. One pound of filet mignon is so much more valuable (and tasty) than ten pounds of chuck roast. Sure there's good red meat in both, but what to do with all the fat of the latter. Kretzmann's commentary on Luke is so much more valuable than Just's two-volume commentary. While you may want to have both, you must weigh the cost.