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The Lost Gospel: The Book of Q and Christian Origins epub download

by Burton L. Mack


The Lost Gospel book.

The Lost Gospel book. Burton L. Mack does not claim that any of them deliberately tried to change Jesus into something he was not, but that time and attitude had changed portions of the population's interpretations as to the significance of Jesus's message.

Chapter Two: The Lost Boys and Girls. Chapter Three: Another Window Opens on Strange Connections. Burton Mack and 9-11. Chaos and Consent: Working Towards the Fuhrer. Chapter Four: Dead Babies and Iron Skillets. Chapter Five: Jane Eyre Redux. Chapter Six: Violets and Bulls in the Graveyard. Chapter Seven: Trapezes and Dog Days. Chapter Eight: The Farm. Chemtrails? Contrails? Strange Skies.

A reconstructed collection of sayings attributed to Jesus reveals Jesus as a Jewish sage who was later mythologized into the ''''Christ'''' revered by the world's Christian communities. By the author of A Myth of Innocence. Download (pdf, . 2 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Mack begins his discussion saying: Once upon a time, before there were gospels of the kind familiar to readers of the New Testament, the first followers of Jesus wrote another kind of book. Instead of telling a dramatic story about Jesus' life, their book contained only his teachings. They lived with these teachings ringing in their ears and thought of Jesus as the founder of their movement. But their focus was not on the person of Jesus or his life and destiny.

Burton L. Mack is John Wesley Professor of the New Testament at the school of Theology at Claremont and the author of The Lost Gospel: The Book Q and Christian Origin and A Myth of Innocence: Mark and Christian Origins. Библиографические данные. The Lost Gospel: The Book of Q & Christian Origins Social Institutions and Social Change.

Author Bio. ▼▲.

This book is about the lost gospel Q and its challenge to the conventional picture of Christian origins. In part I of the book the story of Q’s discovery and reconstruction is sketched in broad outline. The full history of scholarly machinations is not given, for this would require a lengthy rehearsal of detailed argumentation from an extensive scholarly bibliography

The first book to give the full account of the lost gospel of Jesus' original followers, revealing him to be a Jewish Socrates who was mythologized into the New Testament Christ.

The Lost Gospel: The Book of Q and Christian Origins epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060653750

ISBN: 0060653752

Author: Burton L. Mack

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: HarperOne; Reprint edition (April 8, 1994)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB size: 1275 kb

FB2 size: 1401 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 779

Other Formats: lit doc rtf azw

Related to The Lost Gospel: The Book of Q and Christian Origins ePub books

Nirn
Extremely interesting book, mainly for those who are already acquainted with the subject. In Mack's opinion, Jesus was a Cynic and not an apocalyptic evangelist. That is also the opinion of the Jesus Seminar. That Jesus was not an apocalypticist was the basis for many of their decisions that a given saying in the NT was or was not actually stated by Jesus. However, the majority opinion (I think), among academians that have studied the NT, believe the opposite.

For another opinion about Q, I turned to Wikipedia. I know a lot of people don't like Wikipedia. They don't like it for the same reason I like it. It is secular and doesn't give Christianity (or any other historical data) any privileged exemption from modern historical and scientific analysis. The following three paragraphs are primarily Wiki, with some of my comments. I urge anyone interested to just google it and read it entirely - much more than 3 paragraphs. I didn't put quotes around it because I did paraphrase it a little.

The Q source is a hypothetical written collection of sayings of Jesus defined as the "common" material found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke but not in their other written source, the Gospel of Mark. (Actually, if I'm not mistaken, Mack does include a few sayings from Q in Mark.)

Although some of the Amazon reviewers state Mack's ready acceptance of "Q" has been discredited, Q is one of the foundations of modern (liberal) gospel scholarship. Around the turn of the century, B. H. Streeter formulated a widely accepted view of Q: that it was a written document (not an oral tradition) composed in Greek; that almost all of its contents appear in Matthew, in Luke, or in both; and that Luke more often preserves the original order of the text than Matthew. In the two-source hypothesis, (the two sources being Mark and Q), Matthew and Luke both used Mark and Q as sources. Some scholars have postulated that Q is actually a plurality of sources, some written and some oral. Others have attempted to determine the stages in which Q was composed. This would include our author.

The existence of Q has been questioned by others. The omission of what should have been a highly treasured dominical document from all the early Church catalogs and from mention by the fathers of the early Church, might be seen as a great conundrum of modern Biblical scholarship. However, copying Q might have been seen as unnecessary as it was preserved in the gospels that were considered canonical. Hence it was preferable to copy Gospels of Matthew and Luke, where the sayings of Jesus from Q were rephrased by the authors; to fit their own situations and their understanding of what Jesus had really meant. Despite challenges, the two source hypothesis retains wide support, unlike what some reviewers suggest.

Back to me, entirely: I agree that humans are capable of inventing patterns out of thin air - that's the core of conspiracy theories. This particular one is thicker air - a lot of evidence to work with. I would love it if a copy of "Q" somehow materialized, but I'm not holding my breath.
Nirn
Extremely interesting book, mainly for those who are already acquainted with the subject. In Mack's opinion, Jesus was a Cynic and not an apocalyptic evangelist. That is also the opinion of the Jesus Seminar. That Jesus was not an apocalypticist was the basis for many of their decisions that a given saying in the NT was or was not actually stated by Jesus. However, the majority opinion (I think), among academians that have studied the NT, believe the opposite.

For another opinion about Q, I turned to Wikipedia. I know a lot of people don't like Wikipedia. They don't like it for the same reason I like it. It is secular and doesn't give Christianity (or any other historical data) any privileged exemption from modern historical and scientific analysis. The following three paragraphs are primarily Wiki, with some of my comments. I urge anyone interested to just google it and read it entirely - much more than 3 paragraphs. I didn't put quotes around it because I did paraphrase it a little.

The Q source is a hypothetical written collection of sayings of Jesus defined as the "common" material found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke but not in their other written source, the Gospel of Mark. (Actually, if I'm not mistaken, Mack does include a few sayings from Q in Mark.)

Although some of the Amazon reviewers state Mack's ready acceptance of "Q" has been discredited, Q is one of the foundations of modern (liberal) gospel scholarship. Around the turn of the century, B. H. Streeter formulated a widely accepted view of Q: that it was a written document (not an oral tradition) composed in Greek; that almost all of its contents appear in Matthew, in Luke, or in both; and that Luke more often preserves the original order of the text than Matthew. In the two-source hypothesis, (the two sources being Mark and Q), Matthew and Luke both used Mark and Q as sources. Some scholars have postulated that Q is actually a plurality of sources, some written and some oral. Others have attempted to determine the stages in which Q was composed. This would include our author.

The existence of Q has been questioned by others. The omission of what should have been a highly treasured dominical document from all the early Church catalogs and from mention by the fathers of the early Church, might be seen as a great conundrum of modern Biblical scholarship. However, copying Q might have been seen as unnecessary as it was preserved in the gospels that were considered canonical. Hence it was preferable to copy Gospels of Matthew and Luke, where the sayings of Jesus from Q were rephrased by the authors; to fit their own situations and their understanding of what Jesus had really meant. Despite challenges, the two source hypothesis retains wide support, unlike what some reviewers suggest.

Back to me, entirely: I agree that humans are capable of inventing patterns out of thin air - that's the core of conspiracy theories. This particular one is thicker air - a lot of evidence to work with. I would love it if a copy of "Q" somehow materialized, but I'm not holding my breath.
blac wolf
This is the best introduction to the origens of Christianity that I have read. Here Mr. Mack separates the original teachings based on exegises of the Mark, Matthew and Luke Gospels. What remains, Q, is a series of aphorisms much in the style of the Gospel of Thomas. All the rest - the birth, the cross, the resurrection, is aledged to be myth making. Mr. Mack ignores the Gospel of John and and Paul's letters.
blac wolf
This is the best introduction to the origens of Christianity that I have read. Here Mr. Mack separates the original teachings based on exegises of the Mark, Matthew and Luke Gospels. What remains, Q, is a series of aphorisms much in the style of the Gospel of Thomas. All the rest - the birth, the cross, the resurrection, is aledged to be myth making. Mr. Mack ignores the Gospel of John and and Paul's letters.
Cobandis
A scholarly book with too much detail for the casual reader, but well worth reading. Going against the grain on any religion is always a struggle since people are taught from a very young age to believe the story told to them or face certain damnation. Q shows that much of Christian dogma is fiction and how most of the sacred tenants such as the virgin birth and resurrection are borrowed from prior faiths. Those who came after Jesus saw an opportunity to build an empire by embellishing the Jesus story with miracles to make it sell better to people looking for a better life, even it came after death. Q also proposes that Jesus never said he was the son of God. The sayings of Jesus recovered by the researchers paint him as what we would call a political activist today.
Cobandis
A scholarly book with too much detail for the casual reader, but well worth reading. Going against the grain on any religion is always a struggle since people are taught from a very young age to believe the story told to them or face certain damnation. Q shows that much of Christian dogma is fiction and how most of the sacred tenants such as the virgin birth and resurrection are borrowed from prior faiths. Those who came after Jesus saw an opportunity to build an empire by embellishing the Jesus story with miracles to make it sell better to people looking for a better life, even it came after death. Q also proposes that Jesus never said he was the son of God. The sayings of Jesus recovered by the researchers paint him as what we would call a political activist today.
Zodama
If you are truly interested scholarly biblical work, this is a must read.
It describes that social, economic, and religious worlds in changing time - the Mediterranean world is moving from Greek power to the power of Rome. It sets this scene in the first third of the book and then goes on to discuss the time of Christ in the area then known as Judea. It discusses what archeaologist and historical researchers can confirm as to what Jesus actually said versus what others said about him. "Q" is the first letter of the German word for 'source' and refers to a source writing that has never been discovered, but that lmany biblical scholars believe exists.
Zodama
If you are truly interested scholarly biblical work, this is a must read.
It describes that social, economic, and religious worlds in changing time - the Mediterranean world is moving from Greek power to the power of Rome. It sets this scene in the first third of the book and then goes on to discuss the time of Christ in the area then known as Judea. It discusses what archeaologist and historical researchers can confirm as to what Jesus actually said versus what others said about him. "Q" is the first letter of the German word for 'source' and refers to a source writing that has never been discovered, but that lmany biblical scholars believe exists.
Enalonasa
Burton Mack fills the details of the missing "Q" quite well. Great read for those curious about the origins of Christianity and the other source for the gospels of both Matthew and Luke.
Enalonasa
Burton Mack fills the details of the missing "Q" quite well. Great read for those curious about the origins of Christianity and the other source for the gospels of both Matthew and Luke.