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New Testament Commentary: James and I-III John epub download

by Simon J. Kistemaker


Kistemaker has fairly extensive introductions to each of these letters.

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James and I-III John. by Simon J. Kistemaker. Select Format: Hardcover.

Simon J. Kistemaker (October 21, 1930 – September 23, 2017) was a New Testament scholar. He served as Professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary

Simon J. He served as Professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary. Kistemaker studied at Calvin College and Calvin Theological Seminary before obtaining a ThD from the Free University in Amsterdam.

com's Simon J. Kistemaker Page and shop for all Simon J. Kistemaker books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Simon J.

James and the Epistles of John. Authors: William Hendriksen, Simon J. Publication Date: 1986. Pages: 405. The author's own translation and complete exegesis are especially helpful for preachers and teachers.

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Since Hendriksen's death in 1982, the series has been continued by Simon J. Four of the volumes compiled by Kistemaker earned the Gold Medallian Award (Hebrews, James and 1-3 John, Acts, and 1 Corinthians).

Series: Hendriksen & Kistemaker Categories: James Johannine Epistles Tags: TechnicalPastoral. Pages: Publisher: Baker Books Published: 2002 ISBN-10: 0801020808 ISBN-13: 9780801020803.

Simon J. Kistemaker's first contribution to the New Testament Commentary, an exposition of Hebrews published in 1984, moved the first reviewer to describe him as "a worthy successor" to William Hendriksen. Kistemaker's second volume, Exposition of the Epistles of James and John, lends additional credence to this claim. This newest addition to the New Testament Commentary shares the strengths of previous volumes, striking a delicate balance between scholarly and practical concerns, between exegetical and homiletical material. The New Testament Commentary continues to be one of the finest tools for the evangelical who wishes to study a biblical book in detail, particularly in preparation for preaching or teaching that book. The author introduces the epistle of James and those of John, outlines each epistle in detail, comments on the text, offers "practical considerations" that help one "apply" the text, and comments on Greek words, phrases, and constructions. Footnotes provide documentation and additional discussion.

New Testament Commentary: James and I-III John epub download

ISBN13: 978-0801054693

ISBN: 0801054699

Author: Simon J. Kistemaker

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Baker Pub Group; First Edition edition (July 1, 1986)

Pages: 425 pages

ePUB size: 1154 kb

FB2 size: 1142 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 448

Other Formats: txt azw lit lrf

Related to New Testament Commentary: James and I-III John ePub books

Ice_One_Guys
The New Testament Commentary volumes written by Dr. Kistemaker are very thoughtful and well done. While I do not concur with his Reformed conclusions, overall he does an excellent job of sticking to the text with sound exegesis.
Ice_One_Guys
The New Testament Commentary volumes written by Dr. Kistemaker are very thoughtful and well done. While I do not concur with his Reformed conclusions, overall he does an excellent job of sticking to the text with sound exegesis.
doesnt Do You
Simon Kistemaker took over the completion of the New Testament Commentary series when Wm. Hendriksen passed away. He did a good job of continuing the tradition established by Hendriksen of writing a commentary that is at once scholarly and easy for the layperson to understand. This is certainly true of Kistemaker's commentary on James and John's letters. As with the volumes written by Hendriksen, the writing is clear and the more technical analysis of the Greek text and other issues is kept separate from the main body of the commentary. One difference is that Hendriksen provided his own translation of the Greek text. Kistemaker uses the original NIV translation.

Some years ago I did sermon series on both James and I John and used this commentary more than I did any other.
doesnt Do You
Simon Kistemaker took over the completion of the New Testament Commentary series when Wm. Hendriksen passed away. He did a good job of continuing the tradition established by Hendriksen of writing a commentary that is at once scholarly and easy for the layperson to understand. This is certainly true of Kistemaker's commentary on James and John's letters. As with the volumes written by Hendriksen, the writing is clear and the more technical analysis of the Greek text and other issues is kept separate from the main body of the commentary. One difference is that Hendriksen provided his own translation of the Greek text. Kistemaker uses the original NIV translation.

Some years ago I did sermon series on both James and I John and used this commentary more than I did any other.
Frei
When William Hendriksen died having published commentaries on a significant portion of the New Testament, Simon Kistemaker, professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, took over the task of completing the work. His first volume (Hebrews) showed that he was a worthy successor to Hendriksen. His second volume, on James and the three Johannine epistles, continues his excellent work.

Kistemaker's writing is accessible and readable. While he presents a fairly in-depth and scholarly analysis of the text, he writes in a lively fashion that is not at all tedious. His points are made clearly and straightforwardly, making what he says accessible to the layperson with little or no antecedent familiarity with the epistles. The analysis of the Greek text is kept separate from the main commentary, which allows those who do not know Greek or who are otherwise not particularly interested in textual analysis to skip over this material.

I preached on both James and 1 John very shortly after this volume was written (1986) and I found Kistemaker's commentary to be the one I consulted most frequently as I prepared my sermons.
Frei
When William Hendriksen died having published commentaries on a significant portion of the New Testament, Simon Kistemaker, professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, took over the task of completing the work. His first volume (Hebrews) showed that he was a worthy successor to Hendriksen. His second volume, on James and the three Johannine epistles, continues his excellent work.

Kistemaker's writing is accessible and readable. While he presents a fairly in-depth and scholarly analysis of the text, he writes in a lively fashion that is not at all tedious. His points are made clearly and straightforwardly, making what he says accessible to the layperson with little or no antecedent familiarity with the epistles. The analysis of the Greek text is kept separate from the main commentary, which allows those who do not know Greek or who are otherwise not particularly interested in textual analysis to skip over this material.

I preached on both James and 1 John very shortly after this volume was written (1986) and I found Kistemaker's commentary to be the one I consulted most frequently as I prepared my sermons.
Yanki
Although Kistemaker's analysis of the text of James and the Johannine epistles is fairly scholarly, it is also is accessible and readable, his writing style being lively and not at all tedious. The analysis of the Greek text is separate from the main body of the commentary. His introductory material to these books is interesting and is reasonably thorough. Some years ago when I preached series on James and 1 John I consulted this commentary more frequently than any others while doing my background study.
Yanki
Although Kistemaker's analysis of the text of James and the Johannine epistles is fairly scholarly, it is also is accessible and readable, his writing style being lively and not at all tedious. The analysis of the Greek text is separate from the main body of the commentary. His introductory material to these books is interesting and is reasonably thorough. Some years ago when I preached series on James and 1 John I consulted this commentary more frequently than any others while doing my background study.
Malalanim
This commentary is among my favorite three for James because of its good exegesis, accessibility, and lucidity of writing. His comments are both exegetically sound and defended, making this a good tool of the scholar, but his hermeneutics lead to homiletics in this commentary: His practical applications flowing from the meaning of the text make this a great resource for pastors, small group leaders, and even all Christians.
Unfortunately, he falls short by taking the view of James as the "Proverbs of the New Testament". He tends to take each section as an independent piece, drawing from others in his explanations of them, but he fails to reveal the connectedness fo the various sections as Moo and others do. This is a rather serious downfall of many commentaries on James. A thorough defensible and effectual view of James comes from an understanding of the flow of thought among the sections. When this is not understood, the book can tend to become a "to-do" list with tons of application, but the motivation can be lost. I know that Kistemaker would never have intended to do this in his very well written and useful commentary, but it is a potential downfall of the work nevertheless.
Despite that downfall, I very highly recommend Kistemaker's Exposition of James.
Malalanim
This commentary is among my favorite three for James because of its good exegesis, accessibility, and lucidity of writing. His comments are both exegetically sound and defended, making this a good tool of the scholar, but his hermeneutics lead to homiletics in this commentary: His practical applications flowing from the meaning of the text make this a great resource for pastors, small group leaders, and even all Christians.
Unfortunately, he falls short by taking the view of James as the "Proverbs of the New Testament". He tends to take each section as an independent piece, drawing from others in his explanations of them, but he fails to reveal the connectedness fo the various sections as Moo and others do. This is a rather serious downfall of many commentaries on James. A thorough defensible and effectual view of James comes from an understanding of the flow of thought among the sections. When this is not understood, the book can tend to become a "to-do" list with tons of application, but the motivation can be lost. I know that Kistemaker would never have intended to do this in his very well written and useful commentary, but it is a potential downfall of the work nevertheless.
Despite that downfall, I very highly recommend Kistemaker's Exposition of James.