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Resurrection: Myth or Reality? epub download

by John Shelby Spong


His books in John Shelby Spong was the Episcopal bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000.

His books in John Shelby Spong was the Episcopal bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000. As a leading spokesperson for an open, scholarly, and progressive Christianity, Bishop Spong has taught at Harvard and at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. He has also lectured at universities, conference centers, and churches in North America, Europe, Asia, and the South Pacific.

Resurrection: Myth or Reality? Paperback – February 18, 1995. John Shelby Spong is an Episcopal Bishop and the author of several books, among them Born of a Woman, Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism, and This Hebrew Lord. by. John Shelby Spong (Author). In the current book Spong examines the most minute details about the Resurrection in an attempt to re-visit the "Easter" story that is at the core of Christianity. Spong's unique contribution to this analysis is his deep familiarity with Hebrew literature and the midrash tradition, the lens through which the all Jewish people of the first century interpreted the gospels.

John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal Bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000, has been a visiting lecturer at Harvard and at more than 500 other universities all over the world

John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal Bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000, has been a visiting lecturer at Harvard and at more than 500 other universities all over the world. His books, which have sold well over a million copies, include Biblical Literalism: A Gentile Heresy; The Fourth Gospel: Tales of a Jewish Mystic; Re-Claiming the Bible for a Non-Religious World; Eternal Life: A New Vision; Jesus for the Non-Religious, The Sins of Scripture, Resurrection: Myth or Reality?; Why Christianity Must Change or Die; and his autobiography, Here I Stand. He writes a weekly column on the web.

Resurrection: Myth or Reality? by John Shelby Spong

Resurrection: Myth or Reality? by John Shelby Spong. In both his televised interviews with Bill Moyers and The Power of Myth, the book that grew out of that series, I was touched by Campbell's ability to see the truth of myths while refusing to literalize the rational explanation of those myths, which found permanent places in religion and liturgy. Campbell enabled me to appreciate such timeless themes as virgin births, incarnations, physical resurrections, and cosmic ascensions, which appear again and again in the religious histories of the world's peoples.

John Shelby "Jack" Spong (born June 16, 1931) is a retired bishop of the Episcopal Church. From 1979 to 2000, he was the Bishop of Newark, New Jersey. Spong was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and educated in public schools there.

John Shelby Spong is an Episcopal Bishop and the author of several books, among them Born of a Woman, Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism, and This Hebrew Lord

John Shelby Spong is an Episcopal Bishop and the author of several books, among them Born of a Woman, Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism, and This Hebrew Lord.

Jesus Christ, Christianity, Future life. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger1 on September 27, 2011.

Using approaches from the Hebrew interpretive tradition to discern the actual events surrounging Jesus' death, Bishop Spong questions the hitorical validity of literal narrative concerned the Ressurection. He asserts that the resurrection story was born in an experience that opened the disciples' eyes to the reality of God and the meaning of Jesus of Nazareth. Spong traces the Christian origins of anti-Semitism to the Church's fabrication of the ultimate Jewish scapegoat, Judas Iscariot. He affirms the inclusiveness of the Christian message and emphasizes the necessity of mutual integrity and respect among Christians and Jews.

Resurrection: Myth or Reality? epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060674298

ISBN: 0060674296

Author: John Shelby Spong

Category: Christian Books

Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: HarperOne; Revised ed. edition (February 18, 1995)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB size: 1672 kb

FB2 size: 1316 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 513

Other Formats: lrf txt lit mbr

Related to Resurrection: Myth or Reality? ePub books

Throw her heart
Part I, APPROACHING THE RESURRECTION, opens with an excellent chapter on Midrash, which is a form of story-telling in which the Jewish scriptures would be searched for a story that was in some way comparable to an event, as an example, in the life of Jesus. It was the first time I really understood what that word means.

Part II, EXAMINING THE BIBLICAL TEXTS, deals with how the biblical writers present the resurrection. As a starting point, Spong writes, "I explore this territory as a believing Christian who will not literalize the details of my faith story" (p.107). I have decided it's easier being a unbeliever than a "believer in exile." It's hard to draw the line between what literally might have happened, what is midrash and what is pure fabrication to advance a particular agenda. Believers have it easy - they just accept it all, no matter how much sense it may not make; so do agnostics, who just throw out the baby with the bathwater. And then there are those of us who want to change the bathwater without throwing out the baby! THAT'S the difficult task!

Part III goes into INTERPRETIVE IMAGES, such as the image of the atoning sacrifice in the Book of Hebrews (excellent treatise!), the Suffering Servant of 2 Isaiah (chapter 12, which was a bit of a stretch for me, yet in a way too simplistic), the Son of Man in the book of Daniel (a surprisingly interesting chapter).

Part IV CLUES THAT LEAD US TO EASTER. The first clue is that the resurrection happened in Galilee and not Jerusalem, which presented a whole new and strange idea for me and which took a rather convoluted route to pursue. It made me shake my head as if to say, "whaaaaat?" (I haven't the foggiest idea how to summarize that idea!) The fifth clue, "The Burial Tradition as Mythology" was a superb chapter! More midrash: the words of Jesus on the Cross used by Matthew and Mark, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" is word-for-word verse 1 of Psalm 22 - casting lots for Jesus' garments is also from Psalm 22 (v.18) - Jesus keeping silent before Pilate and the Sanhedrin (Mark 14:61) harkens back to Isa. 53:7, "He was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth. He was led like a lamb to slaughter.... like a sheep before its shearer...he opened not his mouth." These are but a few of the midrash references.

Part V, RECONSTRUCTING THE EASTER MOMENT. Chapter 19, "But Did It Happen," started out as a gem of rhetoric. Spong writes (p.237-8): "Speculation about what happened cannot replace the conviction that something real transpired.... If I could not move my search beyond angelic messengers, empty tombs and ghostlike apparitions, I could not say yes to Easter. I will not allow my twentieth-century mind to be compromised by the literalism of another era.... We can reject the literal narratives about the resurrection and still not reject the truth and power of the resurrection event itself.... We would not have the legends unless there had been a moment so indescribable that legends became necessary to explain it."

But towards the end of this chapter, Spong's words failed me. Suddenly "God" seemed more like the traditional "Father in Heaven" (or so his words sounded to me). Sometimes Spong tries so hard to explain himself and sometimes gets a little mystical-sounding, which leaves me behind... He writes (p.256): "God had in fact come out of heaven to dwell in Jesus...." Somehow this doesn't sound like Spong's description of God as the Ground of All Being - but I admit I'm still struggling with being able to relate to that non-external, non-theistic "God."

Chapter 20, "Grounding the Speculation in Scripture," was a very difficult chapter to follow. I will have to read it a few more times to make any sense out of it. It was beyond me...

Although chapters 12 and 20 were tedious and wordy at times, the book on the whole is a good read with a fair amount of mind-bending ideas and insights. Spong fans who are "believers in exile" should enjoy this one.
Throw her heart
Part I, APPROACHING THE RESURRECTION, opens with an excellent chapter on Midrash, which is a form of story-telling in which the Jewish scriptures would be searched for a story that was in some way comparable to an event, as an example, in the life of Jesus. It was the first time I really understood what that word means.

Part II, EXAMINING THE BIBLICAL TEXTS, deals with how the biblical writers present the resurrection. As a starting point, Spong writes, "I explore this territory as a believing Christian who will not literalize the details of my faith story" (p.107). I have decided it's easier being a unbeliever than a "believer in exile." It's hard to draw the line between what literally might have happened, what is midrash and what is pure fabrication to advance a particular agenda. Believers have it easy - they just accept it all, no matter how much sense it may not make; so do agnostics, who just throw out the baby with the bathwater. And then there are those of us who want to change the bathwater without throwing out the baby! THAT'S the difficult task!

Part III goes into INTERPRETIVE IMAGES, such as the image of the atoning sacrifice in the Book of Hebrews (excellent treatise!), the Suffering Servant of 2 Isaiah (chapter 12, which was a bit of a stretch for me, yet in a way too simplistic), the Son of Man in the book of Daniel (a surprisingly interesting chapter).

Part IV CLUES THAT LEAD US TO EASTER. The first clue is that the resurrection happened in Galilee and not Jerusalem, which presented a whole new and strange idea for me and which took a rather convoluted route to pursue. It made me shake my head as if to say, "whaaaaat?" (I haven't the foggiest idea how to summarize that idea!) The fifth clue, "The Burial Tradition as Mythology" was a superb chapter! More midrash: the words of Jesus on the Cross used by Matthew and Mark, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" is word-for-word verse 1 of Psalm 22 - casting lots for Jesus' garments is also from Psalm 22 (v.18) - Jesus keeping silent before Pilate and the Sanhedrin (Mark 14:61) harkens back to Isa. 53:7, "He was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth. He was led like a lamb to slaughter.... like a sheep before its shearer...he opened not his mouth." These are but a few of the midrash references.

Part V, RECONSTRUCTING THE EASTER MOMENT. Chapter 19, "But Did It Happen," started out as a gem of rhetoric. Spong writes (p.237-8): "Speculation about what happened cannot replace the conviction that something real transpired.... If I could not move my search beyond angelic messengers, empty tombs and ghostlike apparitions, I could not say yes to Easter. I will not allow my twentieth-century mind to be compromised by the literalism of another era.... We can reject the literal narratives about the resurrection and still not reject the truth and power of the resurrection event itself.... We would not have the legends unless there had been a moment so indescribable that legends became necessary to explain it."

But towards the end of this chapter, Spong's words failed me. Suddenly "God" seemed more like the traditional "Father in Heaven" (or so his words sounded to me). Sometimes Spong tries so hard to explain himself and sometimes gets a little mystical-sounding, which leaves me behind... He writes (p.256): "God had in fact come out of heaven to dwell in Jesus...." Somehow this doesn't sound like Spong's description of God as the Ground of All Being - but I admit I'm still struggling with being able to relate to that non-external, non-theistic "God."

Chapter 20, "Grounding the Speculation in Scripture," was a very difficult chapter to follow. I will have to read it a few more times to make any sense out of it. It was beyond me...

Although chapters 12 and 20 were tedious and wordy at times, the book on the whole is a good read with a fair amount of mind-bending ideas and insights. Spong fans who are "believers in exile" should enjoy this one.
OTANO
We are currently reading this in our book club, a few chapters at a time. Very thought-provoking as Spong questions many of the chronological happenings written regarding Christ in the Bible, particularly in the four gospels. He also questions who are the actual authors, as the fact that they were written so much later than the described happenings. He has a strong faith, but questions some of the described writings as they were "supposed" to occur. Not for the fundamental Christian as he is a very liberal thinker, but a deep thinker as well. Most members of are group are enjoying this different approach as it activates good discussion.
OTANO
We are currently reading this in our book club, a few chapters at a time. Very thought-provoking as Spong questions many of the chronological happenings written regarding Christ in the Bible, particularly in the four gospels. He also questions who are the actual authors, as the fact that they were written so much later than the described happenings. He has a strong faith, but questions some of the described writings as they were "supposed" to occur. Not for the fundamental Christian as he is a very liberal thinker, but a deep thinker as well. Most members of are group are enjoying this different approach as it activates good discussion.
Rolorel
The author challenges many of my beliefs and does a very good job of it. It has resulted in questioning many of thoughts about the bible. New ideas. It will take some time for me to assimilate his assumptions into my spiritual journey. One thing is crystal clear. Something amazing happened with the Resurrection. It changed the course of human history. Was it a physical resurrection or a spiritual one? No one really knows.
Rolorel
The author challenges many of my beliefs and does a very good job of it. It has resulted in questioning many of thoughts about the bible. New ideas. It will take some time for me to assimilate his assumptions into my spiritual journey. One thing is crystal clear. Something amazing happened with the Resurrection. It changed the course of human history. Was it a physical resurrection or a spiritual one? No one really knows.
Ballazan
Well worth reading for the history and scholarship that it contains.

Spong goes to great lengths to explain the "midrash" method of Jewish thought and writing that they used to understand the present in reference to the past - everything gets repeated in a big cycle - everything old is new again.

along the way, he states again and again that the bible is not to be taken literally, and that such things as the virgin birth, miracles and physical resurrection never really happened...in a time when people believed in magic & miracles, of course they would interpret things that way, but that doesn't make them real. His main effort is to understand what really happened, and what caused people to see things the way they did.

he also explains how & why the myths & legends surrounding JC got started - good stuff

- (note that hard cover copies are still available at a reasonable price)
Ballazan
Well worth reading for the history and scholarship that it contains.

Spong goes to great lengths to explain the "midrash" method of Jewish thought and writing that they used to understand the present in reference to the past - everything gets repeated in a big cycle - everything old is new again.

along the way, he states again and again that the bible is not to be taken literally, and that such things as the virgin birth, miracles and physical resurrection never really happened...in a time when people believed in magic & miracles, of course they would interpret things that way, but that doesn't make them real. His main effort is to understand what really happened, and what caused people to see things the way they did.

he also explains how & why the myths & legends surrounding JC got started - good stuff

- (note that hard cover copies are still available at a reasonable price)
Flamekiller
This book takes an approach that is not so scholarly that it is intimidating but offers enough research and knowledge in the subject that the reader finds the thesis of the work understandable,logical,and believable. This book approaches religion pretty much how he approaches religion and God in his other works.
Flamekiller
This book takes an approach that is not so scholarly that it is intimidating but offers enough research and knowledge in the subject that the reader finds the thesis of the work understandable,logical,and believable. This book approaches religion pretty much how he approaches religion and God in his other works.
Direbringer
Totally fascinating. I always wondered how a person of faith, which the author obviously is, could admit to all the relevant facts and still find away to believe. I do think this reduces faith to "the force" as expressed in Star Wars.
Direbringer
Totally fascinating. I always wondered how a person of faith, which the author obviously is, could admit to all the relevant facts and still find away to believe. I do think this reduces faith to "the force" as expressed in Star Wars.
Kelerana
a bit on the wordy side. well thought-out and insightful, tho
Kelerana
a bit on the wordy side. well thought-out and insightful, tho
If anything in the New Testament is reliable historically, it is only by accident. Virtually every word, phrase, and verse comes from midrash (Jewish for "recycling old stories") from the Old Testament, was adapted from mythology, or was fabricated to prove a theological point. Retired Episcopalean Bishop Spong presents data along these lines about as well as I've ever seen, along with ideas I have not read before. My question to him is the same question I had after I finished three other of his books - that is "how are you going to make a religion out of this?"

This time he answers the question. Although he doesn't believe in a physical resurrection of Jesus, he believes in a spiritual resurrection that can be accomplished as a life event in anyone. He spends better than a hundred pages on this and talks as well as any PR man I've ever heard - but to me, he's grasping for "sky hooks." He is unwilling to let go of the spirituality that has been his life's work, even though his extensive study has convinced him it is mythology.
If anything in the New Testament is reliable historically, it is only by accident. Virtually every word, phrase, and verse comes from midrash (Jewish for "recycling old stories") from the Old Testament, was adapted from mythology, or was fabricated to prove a theological point. Retired Episcopalean Bishop Spong presents data along these lines about as well as I've ever seen, along with ideas I have not read before. My question to him is the same question I had after I finished three other of his books - that is "how are you going to make a religion out of this?"

This time he answers the question. Although he doesn't believe in a physical resurrection of Jesus, he believes in a spiritual resurrection that can be accomplished as a life event in anyone. He spends better than a hundred pages on this and talks as well as any PR man I've ever heard - but to me, he's grasping for "sky hooks." He is unwilling to let go of the spirituality that has been his life's work, even though his extensive study has convinced him it is mythology.