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You Don't Have to Be Rich: Comfort, Happiness, and Financial Security on Your Own Terms epub download

by Jean Chatzky


What are "The Ten Commandments of Financial Happiness"? Chatzky address these and countless other questions which many of us may .

What are "The Ten Commandments of Financial Happiness"? Chatzky address these and countless other questions which many of us may have but feel embarrassed to ask. Of course, we can retain highly reputable financial planners whose services are worth every dollar they cost. More specifically, financial planners are most valuable once a client has carefully completed exercises such as those which Chatzky includes in her book.

She gives several tips on finding financial happiness. One tip is to be organized.

That's why it's time to make a change. In her frank, engaging style, Chatzky explains how to "own your money" to create a happy and comfortable life. She gives several tips on finding financial happiness. I know exactly where my bank statements are kept; where I have my check books; where I keep my past income tax forms; and where I have a copy of my Will.

Jean Chatzky's new book on personal finance is unlike any that has come before. While many books merely regurgitate popular dogma, "You Don't have to Be Rich" overs a fresh perspective to personal finance

Jean Chatzky's new book on personal finance is unlike any that has come before. I know becaue I've read dozens of books on personal finance and getting rich. While many books merely regurgitate popular dogma, "You Don't have to Be Rich" overs a fresh perspective to personal finance. This book is somewhat like "The Millionaire Next Door" except that it discusses what the happiest people in America have in common when it comes to managing their money, and what the rest of us can learn from them.

Chatsky is the author of Talking Money and The Rich and Famous Money Book. She outlines the financial habits of happy people and shows how anyone can be a part of this group, no matter what they earn. Chatsky is the author of Talking Money and The Rich and Famous Money Book.

October 24, 200312:00 AM ET. Heard on The Motley Fool.

Rich : Comfort, Happiness, and Financial Security on Your Own Terms.

You Don't Have to Be Rich : Comfort, Happiness, and Financial Security on Your Own Terms. That's why it's time to make a change.

Money, happiness and eternal life - Greed (director's cut) DW Documentary - Продолжительность: 1:31:12 DW Documentary Recommended for you. 1:31:12. Welcome to the Wild West of American Innovation - Продолжительность: 33:40 Bloomberg Recommended for you. 33:40.

Read Jean Sherman Chatzky's resume and weep. of three books including the soon-to-be-released, "You Don't Have to Be Rich: Comfort, Happiness and Financial. Security on Your Own Terms. All this before the age of 40!

Read Jean Sherman Chatzky's resume and weep. All this before the age of 40!

A columnist for Money magazine and financial editor of NBC's Today show identifies money management techniques that can enable readers at any income level to improve their circumstances, outlining the financial habits of happy people while presenting real-life examples of how to implement healthy financial change. 75,000 first printing.

You Don't Have to Be Rich: Comfort, Happiness, and Financial Security on Your Own Terms epub download

ISBN13: 978-1591840121

ISBN: 1591840120

Author: Jean Chatzky

Category: Business and Money

Subcategory: Personal Finance

Language: English

Publisher: Portfolio Hardcover; First Printing edition (September 29, 2003)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1481 kb

FB2 size: 1471 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 395

Other Formats: mobi txt doc docx

Related to You Don't Have to Be Rich: Comfort, Happiness, and Financial Security on Your Own Terms ePub books

Kanrad
I saw Jean Chatsky on TV. Her approach to financial security was refreshing. Instead of "waiting" until you become a millionaire in order to solve all of your financial concerns, she rather teaches us that you don't have to be rich. Instead of trying to stare at the big picture, realize that the big picture is nothing more than a lot of little pictures. When you get the little pictures in order, the big picture changes. For example by observing for two weeks, where your cash in pocket goes, you can find ways to reduce annual expenses by even several thousand dollars per year. Figuring that amount of money, invested over ten years, you come up with a substantial amount of money.

By sitting down and figuring out a budget, or allotment of monies, you can help rid yourself of the irrational spending. Start to figure out what makes you incessantly spend, spend, spend. Counting your money can be fun. Instead of enjoying your new toy for only a day or two after you buy it, then on to the next buy, you rather find joy in the ongoing financial strategy that you employ.

By setting new goals and dreams, you focus your income on value pursuits, rather than buying a whole lot of junk.

This book is chock full of great advice. I'm going to work hard at the suggestions. Enjoy the freedom of knowing that your financial well being is in order.

Hey if your books all balance, even though you are not a millionaire, you can begin to enjoy life. Instead of that aching feeling in the background telling you that something is wrong. Your new value dream that replaces your nonsense spending will fulfill your need to buy.

This book will take you step by step as to how to "clean out the garage" of your personal finances. Highly recommended, and personally I think Jean Chatsky is hot, hot, hot.
Kanrad
I saw Jean Chatsky on TV. Her approach to financial security was refreshing. Instead of "waiting" until you become a millionaire in order to solve all of your financial concerns, she rather teaches us that you don't have to be rich. Instead of trying to stare at the big picture, realize that the big picture is nothing more than a lot of little pictures. When you get the little pictures in order, the big picture changes. For example by observing for two weeks, where your cash in pocket goes, you can find ways to reduce annual expenses by even several thousand dollars per year. Figuring that amount of money, invested over ten years, you come up with a substantial amount of money.

By sitting down and figuring out a budget, or allotment of monies, you can help rid yourself of the irrational spending. Start to figure out what makes you incessantly spend, spend, spend. Counting your money can be fun. Instead of enjoying your new toy for only a day or two after you buy it, then on to the next buy, you rather find joy in the ongoing financial strategy that you employ.

By setting new goals and dreams, you focus your income on value pursuits, rather than buying a whole lot of junk.

This book is chock full of great advice. I'm going to work hard at the suggestions. Enjoy the freedom of knowing that your financial well being is in order.

Hey if your books all balance, even though you are not a millionaire, you can begin to enjoy life. Instead of that aching feeling in the background telling you that something is wrong. Your new value dream that replaces your nonsense spending will fulfill your need to buy.

This book will take you step by step as to how to "clean out the garage" of your personal finances. Highly recommended, and personally I think Jean Chatsky is hot, hot, hot.
Modigas
Disjointed, repetitive, with lots of wasted space for "self testing"
Why would I need 10 more words to express it?
Modigas
Disjointed, repetitive, with lots of wasted space for "self testing"
Why would I need 10 more words to express it?
Dranar
I found the surveys very interesting, how people feel about money and happiness. More importantly, what habits happy people have regarding money. This book has some very practical advice. I liked this book so much, I'm giving it to each of my three adult children for Christmas.
Dranar
I found the surveys very interesting, how people feel about money and happiness. More importantly, what habits happy people have regarding money. This book has some very practical advice. I liked this book so much, I'm giving it to each of my three adult children for Christmas.
Sironynyr
A book that new readers in the realm of financial self help will still find stimulating (the book was published in 2003). For readers who are familiar with this field it will be old news.

Some of the info I am skeptical of. One of these is the author's optimistic statement to continue investing in the stock market. I don't think it is as rosy in the long term as she implies. If you've got the right stocks then it's great.There are writers who use data to show that it often takes many decades to get back the money one may lose in a bad market ( that is if you get any of the money back).

One chapter that I had some interest in was the section on computing retirement financial requirements in chapter 4. There are some calculations to estimate how ready you are for retirement.

Overall it is a book that will whet your thought processes again to use money carefully.
Sironynyr
A book that new readers in the realm of financial self help will still find stimulating (the book was published in 2003). For readers who are familiar with this field it will be old news.

Some of the info I am skeptical of. One of these is the author's optimistic statement to continue investing in the stock market. I don't think it is as rosy in the long term as she implies. If you've got the right stocks then it's great.There are writers who use data to show that it often takes many decades to get back the money one may lose in a bad market ( that is if you get any of the money back).

One chapter that I had some interest in was the section on computing retirement financial requirements in chapter 4. There are some calculations to estimate how ready you are for retirement.

Overall it is a book that will whet your thought processes again to use money carefully.
Dilkree
There are dozens of books which address many of the same topics and issues and this is one of the best because it was written primarily for non-experts such as I who seek "comfort, happiness, and financial security on [our] terms," of course, and need guidance to make appropriate decisions. Answers to questions such as these are more difficult to formulate now than at any prior time that I recall:
* What are the significant differences between standard of living and quality of life?
* Are they mutually exclusive?
* How can -- and should -- "wealth" be measured?
* To what extent (if any) is there a correlation between personal happiness and net worth?
* What do the happiest people seem to share in common?
* What are the most damaging misconceptions many people have when formulating a financial plan?
* Which strategies and tactics are most effective to achieve financial security? Why?
* What are "The Ten Commandments of Financial Happiness"?
Chatzky address these and countless other questions which many of us may have but feel embarrassed to ask. Of course, we can retain highly reputable financial planners whose services are worth every dollar they cost. However, my own experience suggests that a financial planner's best client is a well-informed client. More specifically, financial planners are most valuable once a client has carefully completed exercises such as those which Chatzky includes in her book. Invoking direct address, what do you REALLY want in life? Being rich and being happy are NOT mutually-exclusive. Many people are unhappy because they are essentially insolvent, if not destitute. No savings, credit unworthy, deeply in debt, in danger of foreclosure or eviction, etc. Many others are just as unhappy because of their affluence. They yearn to possess what money can't buy: physical health, peace of mind, friendship worthy of the name, etc.
Caveat: Do NOT purchase this book or any other such book unless and until you are wholeheartedly committed to doing the "homework" required and then to following through on whatever decisions you make. I think that Chapter 6 (all by itself) is worth far more than the cost of the book. However, do you REALLY understand the requirements as well as the benefits of living within your means? Tough decisions may need to be made. (I mean TOUGH.) Do you have what it takes to make them? More importantly, do you have what it takes to stick with those decisions no matter what? Years ago, the actor Rod Steiger was asked if young people ever requested career advice. "Oh yeah, sure, all the time. I look them right in the eye and ask `Do you want to be an actor or do you HAVE to be an actor?' The longer it takes them to answer, the less likely they'll ever make it." If you HAVE to have financial security, Jean Chatzky can help you to achieve it. Otherwise....
Dilkree
There are dozens of books which address many of the same topics and issues and this is one of the best because it was written primarily for non-experts such as I who seek "comfort, happiness, and financial security on [our] terms," of course, and need guidance to make appropriate decisions. Answers to questions such as these are more difficult to formulate now than at any prior time that I recall:
* What are the significant differences between standard of living and quality of life?
* Are they mutually exclusive?
* How can -- and should -- "wealth" be measured?
* To what extent (if any) is there a correlation between personal happiness and net worth?
* What do the happiest people seem to share in common?
* What are the most damaging misconceptions many people have when formulating a financial plan?
* Which strategies and tactics are most effective to achieve financial security? Why?
* What are "The Ten Commandments of Financial Happiness"?
Chatzky address these and countless other questions which many of us may have but feel embarrassed to ask. Of course, we can retain highly reputable financial planners whose services are worth every dollar they cost. However, my own experience suggests that a financial planner's best client is a well-informed client. More specifically, financial planners are most valuable once a client has carefully completed exercises such as those which Chatzky includes in her book. Invoking direct address, what do you REALLY want in life? Being rich and being happy are NOT mutually-exclusive. Many people are unhappy because they are essentially insolvent, if not destitute. No savings, credit unworthy, deeply in debt, in danger of foreclosure or eviction, etc. Many others are just as unhappy because of their affluence. They yearn to possess what money can't buy: physical health, peace of mind, friendship worthy of the name, etc.
Caveat: Do NOT purchase this book or any other such book unless and until you are wholeheartedly committed to doing the "homework" required and then to following through on whatever decisions you make. I think that Chapter 6 (all by itself) is worth far more than the cost of the book. However, do you REALLY understand the requirements as well as the benefits of living within your means? Tough decisions may need to be made. (I mean TOUGH.) Do you have what it takes to make them? More importantly, do you have what it takes to stick with those decisions no matter what? Years ago, the actor Rod Steiger was asked if young people ever requested career advice. "Oh yeah, sure, all the time. I look them right in the eye and ask `Do you want to be an actor or do you HAVE to be an actor?' The longer it takes them to answer, the less likely they'll ever make it." If you HAVE to have financial security, Jean Chatzky can help you to achieve it. Otherwise....