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The essential Alfred Chandler: Essays toward a historical theory of big business epub download

by Alfred Dupont Chandler


This book is a collection of Chandler's essays that have been published in various journals over the years. Chandler is a Business Historian at Harvard. A Historical Survey" originally published in "Daedalus" in 1969.

This book is a collection of Chandler's essays that have been published in various journals over the years. In it, Chandler says that business went through four stages: 1) from merchant to wholesaler; 2) from wholesaler to manufacturer; 3) from manufacturer to manager; and 4) from manager to sharing w/government. The last is probably synonymous with corporatism.

Alfred DuPont Chandler Jr. (September 15, 1918 – May 9, 2007) was a professor of business history at Harvard Business School and Johns Hopkins University. (September 15, 1918 – May 9, 2007) was a professor of business history at Harvard Business School and Johns Hopkins University, who wrote extensively about the scale and the management structures of modern corporations. He received the Pulitzer Prize for History for his work, The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business (1977).

The Essential Alfred Chandler book. Alfred DuPont Chandler, Jr. Chandler has been called "the Herodotus of business history. Books by Alfred D. Chandler Jr. Mor. rivia About Essential Alfred.

Not valid on new books or books that ship from other sellers. Does not combine with other promotions. Image courtesy of openlibrary. The Essential Alfred Chandler: Essays Toward a Historical Theory of Big Business by Thomas K. McCraw, Alfred DuPont, Jr. Chandler. Paperback Book, 544 pages.

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Personal Name: Chandler, Alfred D. (Alfred Dupont), 1918-2007. Uniform Title: Selections. Publication, Distribution, et. Boston, Mass. Harvard Business School Press, (c)1991. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Personal Name: McCraw, Thomas K. Personal Name

Items related to The Essential Alfred Chandler: Essays Toward a. .

Items related to The Essential Alfred Chandler: Essays Toward a Historical. Alfred Dupont Chandler The Essential Alfred Chandler: Essays Toward a Historical Theory of Big Business. In four decades of scholarship, Alfred Chandler has established himself as the acknowledged dean of business historians.

Alfred D. Chandler J. "The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business". Alexander Robert J. Antonio - 1979 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 42:188. Business and Human Rights. Sir Geoffrey Chandler - 1993 - Business Ethics 2 (2):47–49. Alfred D. Robert J. Antonio Robert J.

CHANDLER, ALFRED DUPONT Alfred DuPont Chandler (1918–) is a . historian, specializing in the history of business.

Rent The Essential Alfred Chandler at Chegg. com and save up to 80% off list price and 90% off used textbooks. Subtitle Essays Toward a Historical Theory of Big Business. ISBN13: 9780875843063. More Books . ABOUT CHEGG.

The essential Alfred Chandler: Essays toward a historical theory of big business epub download

ISBN13: 978-0875842998

ISBN: 0875842992

Author: Alfred Dupont Chandler

Category: Business and Money

Language: English

Publisher: Harvard Business School Press (1991)

ePUB size: 1131 kb

FB2 size: 1299 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 389

Other Formats: lit lrf doc mbr

Related to The essential Alfred Chandler: Essays toward a historical theory of big business ePub books

Androlhala
This is a collection of Alfred Chandler's essays that conveys to the reader the essential arguments of Chandler, and how has thinking and interest has evolved over time. The essays include both those that are well-known and heavily cited, as well as "hidden gems" that are included because they are clear expositions of Chandler's thesis, or occupy a critical role in the formation of his ideas. Dr. McCraw has done an excellent job picking the key essays. As an added bonus, each essay is preceded by a half- to one-page commentary that describes its background, subject matter and significance, and ties it to other essays in the book.
Androlhala
This is a collection of Alfred Chandler's essays that conveys to the reader the essential arguments of Chandler, and how has thinking and interest has evolved over time. The essays include both those that are well-known and heavily cited, as well as "hidden gems" that are included because they are clear expositions of Chandler's thesis, or occupy a critical role in the formation of his ideas. Dr. McCraw has done an excellent job picking the key essays. As an added bonus, each essay is preceded by a half- to one-page commentary that describes its background, subject matter and significance, and ties it to other essays in the book.
Grarana
A classic collection.
Grarana
A classic collection.
crazy mashine
This book is a collection of Chandler's essays that have been published in various journals over the years. Chandler is a Business Historian at Harvard. My favorite essay is "The Role of Business in the U.S.: A Historical Survey" originally published in "Daedalus" in 1969. In it, Chandler says that business went through four stages: 1) from merchant to wholesaler; 2) from wholesaler to manufacturer; 3) from manufacturer to manager; and 4) from manager to sharing w/government. The last is probably synonymous with corporatism.

Merchants were pre-1800 and were Hamiltonians who called themselves Federalists, but were actually opposed to federalism and wanted a strong central government instead.

Wholesalers were financiers of long-term growth from 1800 to 1850. They pressured the state and municipal governments to issue or guarantee bonds. They even persuaded the state to build and operate transport facilities, with the average man footing the bill. Wholesalers were sectional, not national, which was evident in wholesalers versus planters (North versus the South).

From 1850 to 1900, manufacturers rose to dominance. Wholesalers were no longer needed. Bankers and railroads along with vertical consolidation caused the demise of the wholesaler. High start-up investment made entry difficult. During this time, the corporate mode of business oranization began growing in popularity. It was easier to move up through the military-like ranks of a corporation than to make one's own business. It is interesting to note that by 1894, U.S. output equalled that of Britain, France and Germany combined!

From 1900 to the Present, the manager mode arose because businesses were being swallowed by corporations. And corporations are not operated by the owners; they are operated by hired managers. Managers are an economic elite, according to Chandler. They used government to finance their projects (public money is the average man's money), used government to protect them from foreign competition, and used government's central banking system beginning in 1913.

In the 1930s, Chandler detected government cooperation with corporations (or what I would call corporatism). About all Chandler had to say about this early form of corporatism was that corporations were unable to alleviate the Depression, so he favored government intervention as a remedy. It is interesting to note that the government, like its child - the corporation, was just as unable to alleviate the Depression; in fact, government intervention prolonged it.

Chandler ends with his survey without drawing conclusions. He says "Such analyses are properly left to social scientists and businessmen". So he get 4 stars for his history, but not a fifth for failing to interpret what it all means.
crazy mashine
This book is a collection of Chandler's essays that have been published in various journals over the years. Chandler is a Business Historian at Harvard. My favorite essay is "The Role of Business in the U.S.: A Historical Survey" originally published in "Daedalus" in 1969. In it, Chandler says that business went through four stages: 1) from merchant to wholesaler; 2) from wholesaler to manufacturer; 3) from manufacturer to manager; and 4) from manager to sharing w/government. The last is probably synonymous with corporatism.

Merchants were pre-1800 and were Hamiltonians who called themselves Federalists, but were actually opposed to federalism and wanted a strong central government instead.

Wholesalers were financiers of long-term growth from 1800 to 1850. They pressured the state and municipal governments to issue or guarantee bonds. They even persuaded the state to build and operate transport facilities, with the average man footing the bill. Wholesalers were sectional, not national, which was evident in wholesalers versus planters (North versus the South).

From 1850 to 1900, manufacturers rose to dominance. Wholesalers were no longer needed. Bankers and railroads along with vertical consolidation caused the demise of the wholesaler. High start-up investment made entry difficult. During this time, the corporate mode of business oranization began growing in popularity. It was easier to move up through the military-like ranks of a corporation than to make one's own business. It is interesting to note that by 1894, U.S. output equalled that of Britain, France and Germany combined!

From 1900 to the Present, the manager mode arose because businesses were being swallowed by corporations. And corporations are not operated by the owners; they are operated by hired managers. Managers are an economic elite, according to Chandler. They used government to finance their projects (public money is the average man's money), used government to protect them from foreign competition, and used government's central banking system beginning in 1913.

In the 1930s, Chandler detected government cooperation with corporations (or what I would call corporatism). About all Chandler had to say about this early form of corporatism was that corporations were unable to alleviate the Depression, so he favored government intervention as a remedy. It is interesting to note that the government, like its child - the corporation, was just as unable to alleviate the Depression; in fact, government intervention prolonged it.

Chandler ends with his survey without drawing conclusions. He says "Such analyses are properly left to social scientists and businessmen". So he get 4 stars for his history, but not a fifth for failing to interpret what it all means.