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The Options Manual epub download

by Gary L. Gastineau


The Stock Options Manual book.

The Stock Options Manual book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Stock Options Manual. by. Gary L. Gastineau.

Gastineau was head of the Option Portfolio Service for Kidder Peabody in the 1970s, honors graduate of Harvard Business School and one of the leading options money managers at the time. He was one of the few who challenged and provided options valuation pricing models that improved upon the Black-Scholes models, but unfortunately did not make them public and hence he is less well known that Black, Scholes. Of the remaining chapters in the book (there are 10 chapters plus appendixes, the only chapter of really useful significance is "Chapter 7 - Evaluation of an Option Contract"

Gary Gastineau, who played a critical role in their development, demystifies the working of these instruments, lucidly describes their advantages and disadvantages, and guides investors on their use. This gem of a book will be the ETF bible for years to come.

Gary Gastineau, who played a critical role in their development, demystifies the working of these instruments, lucidly describes their advantages and disadvantages, and guides investors on their use. Burton Malkiel, Chemical Bank Chairman's Professor of Economics, Princeton University "This is the first comprehensive book on exchange-traded funds

Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки,.

Gary Gastineau's full CV. advertisement. 2/88 – 11/91 SALOMON BROTHERS INC. Vice Securities and Portfolio Trading Analyst Prepared written reports and provided quantitative support for equity futures, options, and portfolio sales and trading.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G. Donald J. Smith, and Rebecca Todd, CFA Gary L.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Risk Management, Derivatives, and Financial Analysis under SFAS No. 133. Download (PDF). Читать. Derivative Strategies for Managing Portfolio Risk. Keith C. Brown, Don M. Chance, Roger G. Clarke, Murali Ramaswami, Matthew R. Smith, Eric S. Reiner, Ira G. Kawaller, Robert W. Kopprasch; David F. DeRosa; Gary L. Gastineau; Joanne M. Hill, Henry M. McMillan, Nederlof Maarten L, Donald L. Luskin; Lloyd Mc.

Previous editions '75 and '79 under the title The Stock options manual. Updated and expanded. Explains how to adjust the market risk of investment portfolios and how options can increase an investor's range of risk-return choices. Basically a good, hands-on aid. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

The Options Manual epub download

ISBN13: 978-0070229815

ISBN: 0070229813

Author: Gary L. Gastineau

Category: Business and Money

Subcategory: Investing

Language: English

Publisher: McGraw-Hill; Subsequent edition (1988)

Pages: 440 pages

ePUB size: 1266 kb

FB2 size: 1612 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 892

Other Formats: azw rtf mobi lit

Related to The Options Manual ePub books

Authis
Just a lot of useless info
Authis
Just a lot of useless info
Duktilar
I have had this book since the mid-80's, and read it back in my college days and referred to it on & off throughout the 90's when there weren't any readable texts on the subject except highly technical graduate business school texts (think of Black-Scholes...books which I also read). While the intent of this review is to counter the curt remarks from the only other recent review of this book, I also want it to be known that at one time - when Amazon first came online over 12+ years ago, this book held high marks, 4-5 stars always, and was also considered a "bible" of stock options. The first edition was written in 1975. For the cost today - between $2 to $10, in my opinion this is one of the easiest reads on both basic and more complex options strategies and pricing/valuation. Of course, the book is over 40 years old, and hence some things are outdated.

Chapters 1-2-3 are introductory - brief mention of characteristics and history (CBOE history) in about 35 pages. The meat of it is in Chpt 4. Section 4A lists 19 Investment Positions & Strategies starting with "Strategy 1 - Cash (Purchasing Short-Term Debt Securities)", Strategy 2 - Long Stock, 3 - Short Stocks, 4 - Long Stocks on Margin, 5 - Short Stocks on Margin, 5 - Long Calls, 6 - Short Calls (Naked Calls)...10 & 11 Long or Short Straddles, Covered Options, Covered Straddles, Strategies 12 thru 16 on Long or Short Stock with Long or Short Calls or Puts or Straddles, ending with Strategies 17/18/19 on Option Hedges. In each strategy, with covers anywhere from 1 to 5 pages each, Gastineau presents the profit/risk scenario, comparisons to the presumed "opposite" strategy (long versus short) and why it is or isn't exactly a reverse of the other. The charts are easy to interpret as anyone with a high school math background should be able to understand them.

Section 4B briefly covers the "Role of Options in Intelligent Portfolio Management" - truly a brief treatise on where options are positioned in a portfolio and its risk-return against other securities in a typical modern complex portfolio. ...yes, a modern portfolio for most individual investors that dabble in INDIVIDUAL BONDS, individual stocks, mutual funds, ETFs, closed end funds, MLPs, REITs, options (long/short/naked/covered/etc), indexes, and foreign ETFs. For the institutional portfolio manager, this book is beyond its prime. The remaining sections of Chapter 4 provides good discussion of Put Options - earlier concepts that will provide insights and origins into today's put options strategies...because if you traded options at all, you know that puts are different animals than calls, and clearly not the exact mirror or opposite of call options.

Chapter 5 goes into tax treatment, and given that this was written 40 years ago is admittedly totally useless of course. Chapter 6 very briefly discusses the role of options trading by various players, from institutional portfolio managers and corporate officers - of course primarily focused on the stock market world of the 1970's. (Gastineau was head of the Option Portfolio Service for Kidder Peabody in the 1970s, honors graduate of Harvard Business School and one of the leading options money managers at the time. He was one of the few who challenged and provided options valuation pricing models that improved upon the Black-Scholes models, but unfortunately did not make them public and hence he is less well known that Black, Scholes.)

Of the remaining chapters in the book (there are 10 chapters plus appendixes, the only chapter of really useful significance is "Chapter 7 - Evaluation of an Option Contract". While many of the pricing valuation models are no longer used as described today, Gastineau acknowledges that he 70 pages of this section is not a detailed analysis of the models, nor was it intended to be a detailed critique of each model. What I find however useful is his experienced, intelligent, and expert albeit brief assessment and analysis of the various models - of which he does go into but even his critiques are scattered throughout this chapter and Chapter 10 "Who Makes Money in the Options Markets?".

Appendix A helps provide an underlying understanding for why and how Margin plays a role in options trading. Today, this topic is glossed over since margin accounts are required by default in order to trade options whatsoever.

So why write a review of a book about stock derivatives that;s over 40 years old? The reader will find half of everything in this book, but updated and slightly more discussion on relevant topics (like tax treatment) in one of those "Understanding the Stock Market for Dummies" or "Options for Dummies" books. But you'll spend $14 or more for the latest edition of those Dummies books. The fact that you can find this book on old book reseller shelves for $2 to $5 is deceiving...because it is worth the brief read for $2 or even $5. If you've traded options successfully at all, you are way past this book. If you have traded but still don't have a clue, no book will help you. Options trading and understanding of underlying concepts is basically math. Success is based on experience learning how to work the trades and exchanges. If you are a newbie beginner, of course get one of the new updated books on Amazon, but if you happen to find this at your local old books reseller, for $2 or even $5, get it and read it a few pages whenever you feel like it.
Duktilar
I have had this book since the mid-80's, and read it back in my college days and referred to it on & off throughout the 90's when there weren't any readable texts on the subject except highly technical graduate business school texts (think of Black-Scholes...books which I also read). While the intent of this review is to counter the curt remarks from the only other recent review of this book, I also want it to be known that at one time - when Amazon first came online over 12+ years ago, this book held high marks, 4-5 stars always, and was also considered a "bible" of stock options. The first edition was written in 1975. For the cost today - between $2 to $10, in my opinion this is one of the easiest reads on both basic and more complex options strategies and pricing/valuation. Of course, the book is over 40 years old, and hence some things are outdated.

Chapters 1-2-3 are introductory - brief mention of characteristics and history (CBOE history) in about 35 pages. The meat of it is in Chpt 4. Section 4A lists 19 Investment Positions & Strategies starting with "Strategy 1 - Cash (Purchasing Short-Term Debt Securities)", Strategy 2 - Long Stock, 3 - Short Stocks, 4 - Long Stocks on Margin, 5 - Short Stocks on Margin, 5 - Long Calls, 6 - Short Calls (Naked Calls)...10 & 11 Long or Short Straddles, Covered Options, Covered Straddles, Strategies 12 thru 16 on Long or Short Stock with Long or Short Calls or Puts or Straddles, ending with Strategies 17/18/19 on Option Hedges. In each strategy, with covers anywhere from 1 to 5 pages each, Gastineau presents the profit/risk scenario, comparisons to the presumed "opposite" strategy (long versus short) and why it is or isn't exactly a reverse of the other. The charts are easy to interpret as anyone with a high school math background should be able to understand them.

Section 4B briefly covers the "Role of Options in Intelligent Portfolio Management" - truly a brief treatise on where options are positioned in a portfolio and its risk-return against other securities in a typical modern complex portfolio. ...yes, a modern portfolio for most individual investors that dabble in INDIVIDUAL BONDS, individual stocks, mutual funds, ETFs, closed end funds, MLPs, REITs, options (long/short/naked/covered/etc), indexes, and foreign ETFs. For the institutional portfolio manager, this book is beyond its prime. The remaining sections of Chapter 4 provides good discussion of Put Options - earlier concepts that will provide insights and origins into today's put options strategies...because if you traded options at all, you know that puts are different animals than calls, and clearly not the exact mirror or opposite of call options.

Chapter 5 goes into tax treatment, and given that this was written 40 years ago is admittedly totally useless of course. Chapter 6 very briefly discusses the role of options trading by various players, from institutional portfolio managers and corporate officers - of course primarily focused on the stock market world of the 1970's. (Gastineau was head of the Option Portfolio Service for Kidder Peabody in the 1970s, honors graduate of Harvard Business School and one of the leading options money managers at the time. He was one of the few who challenged and provided options valuation pricing models that improved upon the Black-Scholes models, but unfortunately did not make them public and hence he is less well known that Black, Scholes.)

Of the remaining chapters in the book (there are 10 chapters plus appendixes, the only chapter of really useful significance is "Chapter 7 - Evaluation of an Option Contract". While many of the pricing valuation models are no longer used as described today, Gastineau acknowledges that he 70 pages of this section is not a detailed analysis of the models, nor was it intended to be a detailed critique of each model. What I find however useful is his experienced, intelligent, and expert albeit brief assessment and analysis of the various models - of which he does go into but even his critiques are scattered throughout this chapter and Chapter 10 "Who Makes Money in the Options Markets?".

Appendix A helps provide an underlying understanding for why and how Margin plays a role in options trading. Today, this topic is glossed over since margin accounts are required by default in order to trade options whatsoever.

So why write a review of a book about stock derivatives that;s over 40 years old? The reader will find half of everything in this book, but updated and slightly more discussion on relevant topics (like tax treatment) in one of those "Understanding the Stock Market for Dummies" or "Options for Dummies" books. But you'll spend $14 or more for the latest edition of those Dummies books. The fact that you can find this book on old book reseller shelves for $2 to $5 is deceiving...because it is worth the brief read for $2 or even $5. If you've traded options successfully at all, you are way past this book. If you have traded but still don't have a clue, no book will help you. Options trading and understanding of underlying concepts is basically math. Success is based on experience learning how to work the trades and exchanges. If you are a newbie beginner, of course get one of the new updated books on Amazon, but if you happen to find this at your local old books reseller, for $2 or even $5, get it and read it a few pages whenever you feel like it.