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Watermelon Nights (Penguin Press) epub download

by Greg Sarris


Watermelon Nights book. Published December 2nd 2005 by Penguin Books (first published 1998). Had the opportunity to meet Greg Sarris and ask him questions.

Watermelon Nights book. One of the questions I asked was the significance of the basket Elba finds as she learns she is pregnant. He said it came to him in a vision one night.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In a powerful follow-up to his widely acclaimed short story collection, Grand Avenue, Greg Sarris tells a tale about the love and forgiveness that keep a modern American Indian family together. Told from the points of view of a twenty-year-old Pomo Indian named Johnny Severe.

In a powerful follow-up to his widely acclaimed short story collection, Grand Avenue, Greg Sarris tells a tale about the love and forgiveness that keep a modem American Indian family together. Told from the points of view of a twenty-year-old Pomo Indian named Johnny Severe, his grandmother, Elba, and his mother, Iris, Watermelon Nights uncovers the secrets behind each of these characters' extraordinary powers of perception

A Native American saga that spans generations chronicles the deep connections among members of Johnny Severe's family, as his mother's and grandmother's pasts retain a fascinating hold over his present.

Sarris's debut novel, like the tales in his collection, Grand Avenue (1994), is set in. .How a mountain was made.

Sarris's debut novel, like the tales in his collection, Grand Avenue (1994), is set in Santa Rosa, a small town on the California coast that's been the home of the Waterplace Pomo since the tribe was forced off of its traditional lands.

Greg Sarris, Rohnert Park. This book does both beautifully. Award winning writer Greg Sarris celebrates Native American roots and ancestral homeland of Sonoma Mountain with sixteen interconnected original stories.

Watermelon nights : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Gregory Michael Sarris (born February 12, 1952) is the Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria (since 1992), the Graton Rancheria Endowed Chair in Creative Writing and Native American Studies at Sonoma State University, and President o.

Gregory Michael Sarris (born February 12, 1952) is the Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria (since 1992), the Graton Rancheria Endowed Chair in Creative Writing and Native American Studies at Sonoma State University, and President of the Graton Economic Development Authority. The author of six books, Sarris's best known work, Grand Avenue (film), is a collection of short stories about contemporary Native American life.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A Native American saga that spans generations chronicles the deep connections among members of Johnny Severe's family.

Watermelon Nights (Penguin Press) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0140282740

ISBN: 0140282742

Author: Greg Sarris

Category: Business and Money

Subcategory: Economics

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Putnam~trade (April 29, 2004)

Pages: 480 pages

ePUB size: 1334 kb

FB2 size: 1514 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 361

Other Formats: rtf azw mbr lrf

Related to Watermelon Nights (Penguin Press) ePub books

Amarin
Besides the main character being a fabulous person with incredible insights the book explores my "home town", Sebastopol, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County. It's not about the "wine country" as we see it portrayed in the slick travel brochures. It goes deeper into life after the take over.
Amarin
Besides the main character being a fabulous person with incredible insights the book explores my "home town", Sebastopol, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County. It's not about the "wine country" as we see it portrayed in the slick travel brochures. It goes deeper into life after the take over.
JoJosho
Have yet to read the tale of a local by a local author but, I did manage to find a signed excellent gently used copy!
JoJosho
Have yet to read the tale of a local by a local author but, I did manage to find a signed excellent gently used copy!
Ishnjurus
I received this item promptly. I haven't had a chance to read it yet but look forward to reading it before summer.
Ishnjurus
I received this item promptly. I haven't had a chance to read it yet but look forward to reading it before summer.
Shakar
Author Greg Sarris offers up a phenomenal generational triptych of Northern California Native American life between about 1920 and close to present, detailing the experiences and perspectives of three generations, Grandmother, Mother, and Son (although not in that order). We have the Waterplace Pomo, a fictionalized tribe, splintered by the forces around them, namely land encroachment, cultural encroachment, and tribal comflict. Sarris sets the book up in a mixed chronological order, thank goodness nowhere as confusing and spartan as Faulner's "The Power and the Fury". We're introduced first to Johnny, son of Iris, grandson of Elba.

Johnny opens the book in near-present time, living in wrong-side-of-the-tracks South Park at the edge of Santa Rosa, where many Waterplace Pomo Indians, as well as Black and poor Mexicans live. Johnny is intent on trying to find a place, torn between his Native American culture and the Anglo world. Moreover he is coming into manhood and discovering his true self and place, while trying his darndest to keep his tribe together. Johnny is constantly trying to understand the connections and perspectives of fellow tribal members at odds with one another. His world is turned upside down by the arrival of another tribal member, Felix--who seems much more concerned with his own image and standing. Despite the facad of confidence and arrogance, it is Felix who disrupts tribal goings-on with his own lack of self knowledge and fragile confidence. He almost manages to destroy Johnny...a lesson for those confronted by such people!

Elba's narrative is a good fictionalized account of Native American life in Northern California during the 1920-50 period. Splintered tribes, extreme conflicts between tribal leaders who preach against all things Anglo even when it is apparent that there is no other way for tribal survival other than mixing to a degree with the people and cultures who now surrond the belagured Waterplace Pomo people. The strong tribal leader, Big Sarah, creates more disharmony by excoriating members who act "white" by going to school, or conceive children outside the tribe, while offering no apparent alternative to the crude survival methods of earning bread money through sexual favors and working for surrounding white families. Caught up in this fundamental battle between a non-bending tribal leader and external forces, many of the upcoming generation, including Elba, are prone to the ensuing circumstances.

The last portion of the book is given to Iris. Iris seems at odds with her indian heritage, which she clearly understands from the whites around her not to be a good thing! She excelles at school, but is frustrated by her mothers encouragement to see and hear the cultural essences of her roots. Elba never clearly instructs Iris, waiting in vain for something intuitive to kick in. It does not. The tie that binds this family together, Iris end up living away from the rest of the tribal members, living a relatively Anglo life, but nonetheless never truely feeling at peace with herself. The strongest undercurrent here is the relationship between Iris and Her mother, Elba.

Iris is the product of a rape by a gang of white men--although Elba never tells her this. To Iris, Elba blames her own prior ways as a "floozy", perhaps as a means of freeing Iris from fear, or not trying to poison all white people (as Big Sarah had). After all, Iris is half white...Unfortunately this doesn't prevent something similar from happening to Anna, Iris's tribal and school friend. After Iris has witnessed the rape of Anna and remained crounched in fear, her mother rebukes her. The result is that Elba, never feeling fully Indian, not knowing the language, flees her mother and the South Park Neighborhood.

There are many floes in this river. Standing out are the many connections people can never break--especially between domestic servants and the families they work for, and other tribal members. While the dominant characters with Elba and Iris are female, two poignent men who stand out are Old Uncle, repository of tribal knowledge who seems to just graze Elba with his healing and grace. Then there is the surprising Patrick Polk, son of the rather domineering and sinister father who once employed Elba. Both suggest repetitive patterns as the tale progresses, and both lead Iris, Johnny and Elba to change the way they act and think for the better, suggesting that acceptance of one's self (Indian, Mixed Heritage, man, woman, gay, straight, etc) is at the core of healing and redemption.

There is no easy ending, no happy solution to life's problems here--as the book ends, people are still busy trying to resolve issues. But they have not given up, and perhaps that is the key to Sarris's tale.

A terrific story, with much to be said for its attention to detail, both the complicated connections and emotions of the characters, and their community. I didn't want it to end! To heck with this being a great book by a Native American, it is just a SUPER BOOK! This would make a terrific read in an advanced high school or a college setting. Especially when considering the undervalued existence of Native (pre-Spanish and Anglo) Americans in California.

For those interested in Northen California's Indian culture, from the top down, I would recommend "When the Great Spitit Died: the Destruction of the California Indians". If you can stomach a non-fiction book, really-READ THIS FIRST. if not, hey, catching up won't kill you! :)
Shakar
Author Greg Sarris offers up a phenomenal generational triptych of Northern California Native American life between about 1920 and close to present, detailing the experiences and perspectives of three generations, Grandmother, Mother, and Son (although not in that order). We have the Waterplace Pomo, a fictionalized tribe, splintered by the forces around them, namely land encroachment, cultural encroachment, and tribal comflict. Sarris sets the book up in a mixed chronological order, thank goodness nowhere as confusing and spartan as Faulner's "The Power and the Fury". We're introduced first to Johnny, son of Iris, grandson of Elba.

Johnny opens the book in near-present time, living in wrong-side-of-the-tracks South Park at the edge of Santa Rosa, where many Waterplace Pomo Indians, as well as Black and poor Mexicans live. Johnny is intent on trying to find a place, torn between his Native American culture and the Anglo world. Moreover he is coming into manhood and discovering his true self and place, while trying his darndest to keep his tribe together. Johnny is constantly trying to understand the connections and perspectives of fellow tribal members at odds with one another. His world is turned upside down by the arrival of another tribal member, Felix--who seems much more concerned with his own image and standing. Despite the facad of confidence and arrogance, it is Felix who disrupts tribal goings-on with his own lack of self knowledge and fragile confidence. He almost manages to destroy Johnny...a lesson for those confronted by such people!

Elba's narrative is a good fictionalized account of Native American life in Northern California during the 1920-50 period. Splintered tribes, extreme conflicts between tribal leaders who preach against all things Anglo even when it is apparent that there is no other way for tribal survival other than mixing to a degree with the people and cultures who now surrond the belagured Waterplace Pomo people. The strong tribal leader, Big Sarah, creates more disharmony by excoriating members who act "white" by going to school, or conceive children outside the tribe, while offering no apparent alternative to the crude survival methods of earning bread money through sexual favors and working for surrounding white families. Caught up in this fundamental battle between a non-bending tribal leader and external forces, many of the upcoming generation, including Elba, are prone to the ensuing circumstances.

The last portion of the book is given to Iris. Iris seems at odds with her indian heritage, which she clearly understands from the whites around her not to be a good thing! She excelles at school, but is frustrated by her mothers encouragement to see and hear the cultural essences of her roots. Elba never clearly instructs Iris, waiting in vain for something intuitive to kick in. It does not. The tie that binds this family together, Iris end up living away from the rest of the tribal members, living a relatively Anglo life, but nonetheless never truely feeling at peace with herself. The strongest undercurrent here is the relationship between Iris and Her mother, Elba.

Iris is the product of a rape by a gang of white men--although Elba never tells her this. To Iris, Elba blames her own prior ways as a "floozy", perhaps as a means of freeing Iris from fear, or not trying to poison all white people (as Big Sarah had). After all, Iris is half white...Unfortunately this doesn't prevent something similar from happening to Anna, Iris's tribal and school friend. After Iris has witnessed the rape of Anna and remained crounched in fear, her mother rebukes her. The result is that Elba, never feeling fully Indian, not knowing the language, flees her mother and the South Park Neighborhood.

There are many floes in this river. Standing out are the many connections people can never break--especially between domestic servants and the families they work for, and other tribal members. While the dominant characters with Elba and Iris are female, two poignent men who stand out are Old Uncle, repository of tribal knowledge who seems to just graze Elba with his healing and grace. Then there is the surprising Patrick Polk, son of the rather domineering and sinister father who once employed Elba. Both suggest repetitive patterns as the tale progresses, and both lead Iris, Johnny and Elba to change the way they act and think for the better, suggesting that acceptance of one's self (Indian, Mixed Heritage, man, woman, gay, straight, etc) is at the core of healing and redemption.

There is no easy ending, no happy solution to life's problems here--as the book ends, people are still busy trying to resolve issues. But they have not given up, and perhaps that is the key to Sarris's tale.

A terrific story, with much to be said for its attention to detail, both the complicated connections and emotions of the characters, and their community. I didn't want it to end! To heck with this being a great book by a Native American, it is just a SUPER BOOK! This would make a terrific read in an advanced high school or a college setting. Especially when considering the undervalued existence of Native (pre-Spanish and Anglo) Americans in California.

For those interested in Northen California's Indian culture, from the top down, I would recommend "When the Great Spitit Died: the Destruction of the California Indians". If you can stomach a non-fiction book, really-READ THIS FIRST. if not, hey, catching up won't kill you! :)
Dakora
i liked this one because it reminded me alot of faulkner. i like the way the narrative was told through each of the three generations of indians. the irony was not lost on me that they resented white people and yet they knew they had to assimilate to survive in america.this book will give you alot to think about....
Dakora
i liked this one because it reminded me alot of faulkner. i like the way the narrative was told through each of the three generations of indians. the irony was not lost on me that they resented white people and yet they knew they had to assimilate to survive in america.this book will give you alot to think about....
Usanner
If you're looking for an authentic Native American voice, keep looking. Greg Sarris is touted as an important Native American writer. The problem is, he's not an Indian. On October 1, 2012, Sarris' cousin came forward in a sworn Declaration to tell the world that her family , the family that Sarris claims to be his own, has no Native American blood.

Her oral tradition is supported by 215 years of genealogical documentation that proves the ancestor Mr. Sarris
Claims to have been The daughter of two California Native Americans was actually the daughter of two
African-Americans from the East Coast who migrated to California during the last days of the Gold Rush.

In his books like Watermelon Nights, Sarris often writes from what he thinks is a female Native American perspective. He has said that he gets these stories from his "family", but his family is not Native American. Instead, since he has no real Native background, he falls back on racial stereotypes about Indians and Indian women that are highly offensive. Women in Sarris' books are promiscuous, Indians are magical and mystical, or they are drunks, or they are unsuccessful and uneducated or all of the above.

In Sarris' narrative, the women get raped or engage in serial affairs or have broods of children out of wedlock or trade sexual favors for necessities, they are hypersexual, and so forth.

In Watermelon Nights, he even gets the namesake of the City of Santa Rosa, CA, wrong. He says that the town is named after an Indian woman who was raped by Mexican soldiers. The city was one of the missions established by Spanish monks in early California. It was called the Mission de Santa Rosa, and was in fact named after St. Rose of Lima (Peru), who died a virgin of great piety and sanctity. You have to ask yourself why Sarris went there. Why the "rape" reference again when it is so obviously false and unnecessary? He seems to be obsessed with rape and promiscuous behavior of Native American women, and engages in the racial gender stereotyping of Native American women, a practice common among White men when referring to Native American women.

In his own story about the women in the family he claims to be his own, the Stewart/Sarragossa/Hilario family, he has done the same thing. Greg Sarris has painted a portrait of the female members of this family not as the decent, hard-working people they were, but as women of questionable morals, who were loose and sleazy.

For example, In the YouTube video Tracing Your Family Roots, Sarris says the following: "(Sarris' great aunt) Juanita married a Mexican and populated half of East L.A." This got a big laugh from the audience, a laugh that was at Juanita's expense.

However, Juanita is the grandmother of Sarris' cousin, the one who has recently come forward to declare that her family has no Indian blood at all. Juanita, a shy, kind woman, had only one child, this cousin's mother, Marguerite. You can easily imagine how offensive Sarris' comment was to his cousin.

I would say to anyone interested in reading Sarris as an authentic Native American voice, "Caveat emptor", and remember Little Tree!
Usanner
If you're looking for an authentic Native American voice, keep looking. Greg Sarris is touted as an important Native American writer. The problem is, he's not an Indian. On October 1, 2012, Sarris' cousin came forward in a sworn Declaration to tell the world that her family , the family that Sarris claims to be his own, has no Native American blood.

Her oral tradition is supported by 215 years of genealogical documentation that proves the ancestor Mr. Sarris
Claims to have been The daughter of two California Native Americans was actually the daughter of two
African-Americans from the East Coast who migrated to California during the last days of the Gold Rush.

In his books like Watermelon Nights, Sarris often writes from what he thinks is a female Native American perspective. He has said that he gets these stories from his "family", but his family is not Native American. Instead, since he has no real Native background, he falls back on racial stereotypes about Indians and Indian women that are highly offensive. Women in Sarris' books are promiscuous, Indians are magical and mystical, or they are drunks, or they are unsuccessful and uneducated or all of the above.

In Sarris' narrative, the women get raped or engage in serial affairs or have broods of children out of wedlock or trade sexual favors for necessities, they are hypersexual, and so forth.

In Watermelon Nights, he even gets the namesake of the City of Santa Rosa, CA, wrong. He says that the town is named after an Indian woman who was raped by Mexican soldiers. The city was one of the missions established by Spanish monks in early California. It was called the Mission de Santa Rosa, and was in fact named after St. Rose of Lima (Peru), who died a virgin of great piety and sanctity. You have to ask yourself why Sarris went there. Why the "rape" reference again when it is so obviously false and unnecessary? He seems to be obsessed with rape and promiscuous behavior of Native American women, and engages in the racial gender stereotyping of Native American women, a practice common among White men when referring to Native American women.

In his own story about the women in the family he claims to be his own, the Stewart/Sarragossa/Hilario family, he has done the same thing. Greg Sarris has painted a portrait of the female members of this family not as the decent, hard-working people they were, but as women of questionable morals, who were loose and sleazy.

For example, In the YouTube video Tracing Your Family Roots, Sarris says the following: "(Sarris' great aunt) Juanita married a Mexican and populated half of East L.A." This got a big laugh from the audience, a laugh that was at Juanita's expense.

However, Juanita is the grandmother of Sarris' cousin, the one who has recently come forward to declare that her family has no Indian blood at all. Juanita, a shy, kind woman, had only one child, this cousin's mother, Marguerite. You can easily imagine how offensive Sarris' comment was to his cousin.

I would say to anyone interested in reading Sarris as an authentic Native American voice, "Caveat emptor", and remember Little Tree!
Jake
I received this book as a present, not knowing much about the author, I decided to give it a try. The book captured my attention and drew me in as each of the characters told their story. There were many unsettling things brought about by this book, but like life itself, it told many aspects of life people try to brush over. Greg Sarris has a way of storytelling that brings the reader into the story and want for more. If you enjoy stories of families and their personal struggles, you too will enjoy this book.
Jake
I received this book as a present, not knowing much about the author, I decided to give it a try. The book captured my attention and drew me in as each of the characters told their story. There were many unsettling things brought about by this book, but like life itself, it told many aspects of life people try to brush over. Greg Sarris has a way of storytelling that brings the reader into the story and want for more. If you enjoy stories of families and their personal struggles, you too will enjoy this book.
GREAT DOWN HOME ARTFUL LIKE COMFORT FOOD STORY TELLING.
A HAVE-2-READ BOOK!
Watermelon Nights (ISBN: 078686110X)
GREAT DOWN HOME ARTFUL LIKE COMFORT FOOD STORY TELLING.
A HAVE-2-READ BOOK!
Watermelon Nights (ISBN: 078686110X)