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The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina - See 1-59643-012-5: The Roman Mysteries, Book VI epub download

by Caroline Lawrence


But changes are on the horizon

The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina (The Roman Mysteries) Paperback – October 15, 2003. by. Caroline Lawrence (Author). We pick up the story in the sixth book of The Roman Mysteries with Marcus Geminus in grave but not disastrous financial circumstances. However, something potentially disastrous seems about to happen where Flavia is concerned. But changes are on the horizon. Captain Marcus Flavius Gemina suddenly feels that his daughter is dangerously independent and informs her that she's not to leave the house without his permission.

The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina is a children's historical novel by Caroline Lawrence, published on June 19, 2003

The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina is a children's historical novel by Caroline Lawrence, published on June 19, 2003. The sixth book of the Roman Mysteries series, it is set in Ostia in December AD 79, during the Saturnalia. Its central themes are love and marriage. The title is a reference to the Twelve Labours of Hercules. The action of the novel takes place in the Roman port of Ostia during a winter festival

When a Roman widow shows unusual interest in Flavia's father, Flavia decides to discover Cartila's true motives by performing twelve tasks, just like the Greek hero Hercules.

When a Roman widow shows unusual interest in Flavia's father, Flavia decides to discover Cartila's true motives by performing twelve tasks, just like the Greek hero Hercules. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-ElisaR on October 29, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Flavia Gemina is a 'girl-detective' in first century Rome, in this series for children (ages 9-14). Book 6. The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina. by Caroline Lawrence. Shelve The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina.

I have raved about all the books thus far in Caroline Lawrence's "The Roman Mysteries" series, but this is. .Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. The twelve tasks of Flavia Gemina is yet another book written by my favourite author Caroline Lawrence

I have raved about all the books thus far in Caroline Lawrence's "The Roman Mysteries" series, but this is the first one that's left me a little cold. It's not bad by any means, but is simply not up to the same excellent standard of previous and subsequent books. The twelve tasks of Flavia Gemina is yet another book written by my favourite author Caroline Lawrence. but most young girls would fall in love with smone young but Flavia's found love with a older ma.Will he ever find out?

The sixth book of the Roman Mysteries series, it is set in Ostia in December AD 79, during the Saturnalia. Several signs, including a dream, make Flavia believe that following a trail guided by the twelve labours of Hercules will lead her to the truth

The sixth book of the Roman Mysteries series, it is set in Ostia in December AD 79, during the Saturnalia. Several signs, including a dream, make Flavia believe that following a trail guided by the twelve labours of Hercules will lead her to the truth. These are generally places in Ostia, such as the Hydra fountain and the Atlas tavern, but also events like the capture of the escaped lion or people such as the gladiator nicknamed the Cretan Bull.

Find nearly any book by Caroline Lawrence (page 4). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Twins Trilogy (Roman Mysteries). ISBN 9781842559970 (978-1-84255-997-0) Hardcover, Orion Children's Books (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd ), 2010. Find signed collectible books: 'Twins Trilogy (Roman Mysteries)'.

Mystery and adventure for four young detectives in Ancient Roman times. Flavia is suspicious of the new woman in her father's life, Cartilia Poplica. She's certain that Cartilia has an ulterior motive, but to find out the truth Flavia must perform twelve tasks - like the Greek hero Hercules. So begins a thrilling journey, but what will Flavia learn at the end of her quest? show more.

See details for additional description. Compare similar products. You are viewing Caroline Lawrence is American. She lives with her husband by the river in London and is active as a speaker in schools and at book festivals

See details for additional description. The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina: Book 6 by Caroline Lawrence (Paperback, 2003). Caroline Lawrence is American. She lives with her husband by the river in London and is active as a speaker in schools and at book festivals. She took part in the British Museum's POMPEII LIVE event, giving talks that were streamed to schools all over the UK, and she is the winner of the 2009 CLASSICS ASSOCIATION PRIZE for 'a significant contribution to the public understanding of Classics'.

Roman Mysteries (TV series) - Infobox Television show name Roman Mysteries caption The Roman Mysteries Title Card genre Children s Action Adventure Period creator Caroline Lawrence director Paul Marcus starring Francesca Isherwood Eli Machover Rebekah.

Marcus and Gaius Geminus - Marcus and Gaius Flavius Geminus are fictional characters in Caroline Lawrence s The Roman Mysteries series. They are identical twin brothers, Marcus is the widowed father of Flavia Gemina, the series protagonist, and Gaius is her uncle.

The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina - See 1-59643-012-5: The Roman Mysteries, Book VI epub download

ISBN13: 978-0761315872

ISBN: 076131587X

Author: Caroline Lawrence

Category: Books for children

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Roaring Brook Press (August 2004)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB size: 1530 kb

FB2 size: 1294 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 786

Other Formats: mbr txt azw lrf

Related to The Twelve Tasks of Flavia Gemina - See 1-59643-012-5: The Roman Mysteries, Book VI ePub books

Kahavor
We pick up the story in the sixth book of The Roman Mysteries with Marcus Geminus in grave but not disastrous financial circumstances. However, something potentially disastrous seems about to happen where Flavia is concerned. He father appears to be interested in marrying again and his intended bride seems to disapprove of her future step-daughter. Worst of all Flavia has been betrothed!

In short, Flavia is grounded because of her general disobediece and eagerness to solve mysteries which her father no longer finds charming. She discovers that her father's intended, named Cartila, was married before and her husband died somewhat mysteriously. Flavia is convinced that the woman has bewitched her father and intends to make him her next victim, and sets out to discover who Cartila is and what her motives are. In the process, Flavia also learns a great deal about herself.

The book is set during Saturnalia so there is a festive atmosphere to the proceedings, and also allows Flavia to engineer her selection as the king of Saturnalia. From a dream she has Flavia adopts the famous twelve tasks of Hercules as her guide to finding clues. It also helps that a new fresco is being painted in her house dealing with all of the tasks. As the book proceeds and our heroes get closer to the truth there are ominous signs that an epidemic has begun in Ostia.

This in the Roman Mysteries series concentrates more on Flavia and her character and her relationship to her father. Like the preceding volumes, Caroline Lawrence writes beautifully and I especially appreciated her descriptions of the Saturnalia. A nice addition to the series that is not to be missed.
Kahavor
We pick up the story in the sixth book of The Roman Mysteries with Marcus Geminus in grave but not disastrous financial circumstances. However, something potentially disastrous seems about to happen where Flavia is concerned. He father appears to be interested in marrying again and his intended bride seems to disapprove of her future step-daughter. Worst of all Flavia has been betrothed!

In short, Flavia is grounded because of her general disobediece and eagerness to solve mysteries which her father no longer finds charming. She discovers that her father's intended, named Cartila, was married before and her husband died somewhat mysteriously. Flavia is convinced that the woman has bewitched her father and intends to make him her next victim, and sets out to discover who Cartila is and what her motives are. In the process, Flavia also learns a great deal about herself.

The book is set during Saturnalia so there is a festive atmosphere to the proceedings, and also allows Flavia to engineer her selection as the king of Saturnalia. From a dream she has Flavia adopts the famous twelve tasks of Hercules as her guide to finding clues. It also helps that a new fresco is being painted in her house dealing with all of the tasks. As the book proceeds and our heroes get closer to the truth there are ominous signs that an epidemic has begun in Ostia.

This in the Roman Mysteries series concentrates more on Flavia and her character and her relationship to her father. Like the preceding volumes, Caroline Lawrence writes beautifully and I especially appreciated her descriptions of the Saturnalia. A nice addition to the series that is not to be missed.
Murn
Again I've downloaded this book for my thirteen-year-old to read. She is really into the series and she found this to be a good read. She feels that the content is age appropriate and she recommends the story to any young teen who is interested in this time period and this type of story.

For parents interested in reading any of these books, I will admit to have sat down and read one of them, 'The Beggar of Volubilis' to see what they were like. The story was okay and I certainly didn't see anything wrong with the content, however the book did not hold my interest. As a reader of the 'Falco' series of books I found the 'Roman Mysteries' to be a little tame. Still I do encourage parents interested in seeing what their kids are reading to give the book a try. You might not like it, but if your child does, let them read it with the knowledge that they are enjoying reading and that the content is certainly appropriate for their age.
Murn
Again I've downloaded this book for my thirteen-year-old to read. She is really into the series and she found this to be a good read. She feels that the content is age appropriate and she recommends the story to any young teen who is interested in this time period and this type of story.

For parents interested in reading any of these books, I will admit to have sat down and read one of them, 'The Beggar of Volubilis' to see what they were like. The story was okay and I certainly didn't see anything wrong with the content, however the book did not hold my interest. As a reader of the 'Falco' series of books I found the 'Roman Mysteries' to be a little tame. Still I do encourage parents interested in seeing what their kids are reading to give the book a try. You might not like it, but if your child does, let them read it with the knowledge that they are enjoying reading and that the content is certainly appropriate for their age.
Drelalak
Every time we finish a book in the Roman Mysteries series we say "that was the best one yet" - but they are all fantastic! I read them with my 11 yr old son & both enjoy them immensely (& I love that they help me pass along my love of classical history)
Drelalak
Every time we finish a book in the Roman Mysteries series we say "that was the best one yet" - but they are all fantastic! I read them with my 11 yr old son & both enjoy them immensely (& I love that they help me pass along my love of classical history)
Fearlesssinger
I loved this book! Although it was sad i think it was awesome just like all of Caroline Lawrence`s books in the Roman mysteries series. I can't wait to read the next book!
Fearlesssinger
I loved this book! Although it was sad i think it was awesome just like all of Caroline Lawrence`s books in the Roman mysteries series. I can't wait to read the next book!
Madis
I have raved about all the books thus far in Caroline Lawrence's "The Roman Mysteries" series, but this is the first one that's left me a little cold. It's not bad by any means, but is simply not up to the same excellent standard of previous and subsequent books. Dealing with unrequited love, escaped animals, and a plot that is based loosely on the twelve tasks of Hercules, it is though Lawrence had a lot of disparate ideas that she wanted to use but couldn't quite piece together properly. Although the research (particularly on the Roman festivals and lifestyle) and her rich, clear prose is as impeccable as ever, the plot is rather haywire. The unclear mystery has an unsatisfactory resolution, and Flavia unfortunately comes across as a bit shrewish.

Ostia in the year 79AD is preparing for the Saturnalia festival, and our four young protagonists are looking forward to the celebrations: introspective Jonathan, wise Nubia, fearless Lupus and headstrong Flavia, who (as the title would suggest) takes centre-stage for this particular story. As an only child with a doting father who gives her the freedom to solve mysteries whenever they crop up, Flavia is conscious and grateful for her charmed life. But changes are on the horizon. Captain Marcus Flavius Gemina suddenly feels that his daughter is dangerously independent and informs her that she's not to leave the house without his permission. It's time that she starts thinking about the prospect of marriage, despite the fact that Flavia believes herself in love with a much older friend of the family. The final blow comes when her father brings home a beautiful young widow. Cartilia Poplica is clearly interested in Marcus, and Flavia is certain that this potential step-mother is the one responsible for the new restrictions on her carefree lifestyle.

Flavia is determined to prove that Cartilia is bewitching her father, and after a strange dream in which she is told by the legendary Hercules that she must complete his twelve tasks, the investigation begins. Using Hercules' tasks as a guide, the clues that it provides leads the friends on a treasure hunt that is so remarkably specific that coincidence borders on the supernatural.

Desire and intrigue is in the air for more than just Flavia's father, as the young detectives uncover the infatuations and love affairs of other lovesick characters, including their tutor, their tutor's friend, Jonathan's betrothed sister, Flavia's uncle, Cartilia's sister, and Nubia herself. Even Lupus fosters a little crush on a fierce warrior-woman, and what the book lacks in clear plot, it tries to make up for in the fact that the youngsters are growing up fast. Flavia in particular gets some long-anticipated character development as she makes her first steps toward womanhood and all that it requires of her.

As other reviews have mentioned, the death of a significant character at the end of the story is a disappointment. There's nothing wrong with a children's story that involves the stark reality of death, but that it happens after an entire book's worth of character development and which is literally squeezed into the final four pages of the book with little foreshadowing makes it feel like a slap in the face. It's as though Lawrence simply lost interest and didn't want to deal with the ramifications of this character's inclusion in future books. It's a pity, as the character in question could have enriched certain aspects of the protagonists' lives.

Though this review may seem largely negative, it's only because the quality of this series as a whole is so high. It's necessary reading in the context of the overarching story at work, and entertaining throughout. On its own terms it is a bittersweet look at first love and begins several important plotlines that will be explored further in later books (as well as wrapping up the long-time tension surrounding Miriam's wedding). Certainly a worthy read, though I suspect most will be happy to move on to The Enemies of Jupiter.
Madis
I have raved about all the books thus far in Caroline Lawrence's "The Roman Mysteries" series, but this is the first one that's left me a little cold. It's not bad by any means, but is simply not up to the same excellent standard of previous and subsequent books. Dealing with unrequited love, escaped animals, and a plot that is based loosely on the twelve tasks of Hercules, it is though Lawrence had a lot of disparate ideas that she wanted to use but couldn't quite piece together properly. Although the research (particularly on the Roman festivals and lifestyle) and her rich, clear prose is as impeccable as ever, the plot is rather haywire. The unclear mystery has an unsatisfactory resolution, and Flavia unfortunately comes across as a bit shrewish.

Ostia in the year 79AD is preparing for the Saturnalia festival, and our four young protagonists are looking forward to the celebrations: introspective Jonathan, wise Nubia, fearless Lupus and headstrong Flavia, who (as the title would suggest) takes centre-stage for this particular story. As an only child with a doting father who gives her the freedom to solve mysteries whenever they crop up, Flavia is conscious and grateful for her charmed life. But changes are on the horizon. Captain Marcus Flavius Gemina suddenly feels that his daughter is dangerously independent and informs her that she's not to leave the house without his permission. It's time that she starts thinking about the prospect of marriage, despite the fact that Flavia believes herself in love with a much older friend of the family. The final blow comes when her father brings home a beautiful young widow. Cartilia Poplica is clearly interested in Marcus, and Flavia is certain that this potential step-mother is the one responsible for the new restrictions on her carefree lifestyle.

Flavia is determined to prove that Cartilia is bewitching her father, and after a strange dream in which she is told by the legendary Hercules that she must complete his twelve tasks, the investigation begins. Using Hercules' tasks as a guide, the clues that it provides leads the friends on a treasure hunt that is so remarkably specific that coincidence borders on the supernatural.

Desire and intrigue is in the air for more than just Flavia's father, as the young detectives uncover the infatuations and love affairs of other lovesick characters, including their tutor, their tutor's friend, Jonathan's betrothed sister, Flavia's uncle, Cartilia's sister, and Nubia herself. Even Lupus fosters a little crush on a fierce warrior-woman, and what the book lacks in clear plot, it tries to make up for in the fact that the youngsters are growing up fast. Flavia in particular gets some long-anticipated character development as she makes her first steps toward womanhood and all that it requires of her.

As other reviews have mentioned, the death of a significant character at the end of the story is a disappointment. There's nothing wrong with a children's story that involves the stark reality of death, but that it happens after an entire book's worth of character development and which is literally squeezed into the final four pages of the book with little foreshadowing makes it feel like a slap in the face. It's as though Lawrence simply lost interest and didn't want to deal with the ramifications of this character's inclusion in future books. It's a pity, as the character in question could have enriched certain aspects of the protagonists' lives.

Though this review may seem largely negative, it's only because the quality of this series as a whole is so high. It's necessary reading in the context of the overarching story at work, and entertaining throughout. On its own terms it is a bittersweet look at first love and begins several important plotlines that will be explored further in later books (as well as wrapping up the long-time tension surrounding Miriam's wedding). Certainly a worthy read, though I suspect most will be happy to move on to The Enemies of Jupiter.