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King Matt the First epub download

by Richard Lourie,Bruno Bettelheim,Janusz Korczak


King Matt the First (Polish: Król Maciuś Pierwszy) is a children's novel by Polish author, physician, and child pedagogue Janusz Korczak.

King Matt the First (Polish: Król Maciuś Pierwszy) is a children's novel by Polish author, physician, and child pedagogue Janusz Korczak. In addition to telling the story of a young king's adventures, it describes many social reforms, particularly targeting children, some of which Korczak enacted in his own orphanage, and is a thinly veiled allegory of contemporary and historical events in Poland.

Richard Lourie's translation in sympathetic and follows the style of Korczak faithfully.

Ships from and sold by KatieTheBookLady. Richard Lourie's translation in sympathetic and follows the style of Korczak faithfully.

King Matt the First book. Janusz Korczak, Richard Lourie (Translator). During World War II, the Jewish orphanage he directed was relocated to the Warsaw ghetto.

Translated by Richard Lourie. With an introduction by Esmé Raji Codell. Indeed, King Matt the First appears to be the most graceful and lasting manifestation of Korczak’s visionary assessment of the rich moral life and potential of children

Translated by Richard Lourie. Indeed, King Matt the First appears to be the most graceful and lasting manifestation of Korczak’s visionary assessment of the rich moral life and potential of children. King Matt the First recounts the adventures of a boy who, after the death of his father, is left with the overwhelming task of ruling a country. And what reforms they are!

KING MATT THE FIRST By Janusz Korczak. Translated by Richard Lourie. Introduction by Bruno Bettelheim. Though King Matt, the reformer, is vanquished, his spirit of reform is kept alive by the book's open ending

KING MATT THE FIRST By Janusz Korczak. 332 pp. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Though King Matt, the reformer, is vanquished, his spirit of reform is kept alive by the book's open ending. Rather, he wanted to provide a vivid and realistic picture of those forces that undermine progressive change so that children and adult reformers would know what obstacles to expect and would not abandon their struggle. Korczak himself never, never abandoned hope.

King Matt the First is a children's novel by Polish author, physician, and child pedagogue Janusz Korczak. In addition to telling the story of a young king's adventures, it describes many social reforms, particularly targeting children, some of which Korczak enacted. The author's father died in 1896, leaving Korczak, at 18, the head of the family and the sole breadwinner for his mother, sister, and grandmother. In 1911–1912 Korczak became a director of Dom Sierot, an orphanage of his own design for Jewish children in Warsaw, where he formed a kind of a republic for children with its own small parliament, court and newspaper.

King Matt the First, one of Korczak's most beloved tales, is the story of a boy who becomes king and sets out to reform his kingdom. He decrees that all children are to be given a piece of chocolate at the end of each day. He visits faraway lands and befriends cannibal kings

King Matt the First, one of Korczak's most beloved tales, is the story of a boy who becomes king and sets out to reform his kingdom. He visits faraway lands and befriends cannibal kings. Whenever his ministers tell him something's impossible, he puts them in jail. He disguises himself as a soldier and becomes a hero

King Matt the First - Janusz Korczak. King Matt the First actually needs no introduction, for it is easily understood and can be thoroughly enjoyed by people of all ages.

King Matt the First - Janusz Korczak. This charming story is a delight to read and is worthy of many rereadings by children and adults alike. But moving as King Matt’s story is, much more so is the story of Korczak’s life and work in which King Matt had its origin. In fact, King Matt is a fable derived from the efforts of a very great man to create a better world for us all, by creating one in which the best interests of children are safeguarded.

During World War II, the Jewish orphanage he directed was relocated to the Warsaw ghetto.

Matt is crowned king when his father, Stephen the Wise, passes away, but when Matt tries to reform his kingdom and help its children, he is dethroned and sent into exile

King Matt the First epub download

ISBN13: 978-0374341398

ISBN: 0374341397

Author: Richard Lourie,Bruno Bettelheim,Janusz Korczak

Category: Books for children

Subcategory: Growing Up & Facts of Life

Language: English

Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st edition (March 1, 1986)

Pages: 332 pages

ePUB size: 1751 kb

FB2 size: 1592 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 921

Other Formats: lrf lit mbr rtf

Related to King Matt the First ePub books

Fato
I was intrigued by the earlier reviewers who called this a great, classic children's book. It is unique in my experience of children's literature and I would agree that it is a classic, though one flawed for modern readers. It is written (or shall I say translated - I don't speak Polish) in an informal, narrative style that favors reading it aloud. This is the story of young Matt, who ascends to the throne as a young boy and progressively comes to terms with his powers and responsibilities as a leader. King Matt is a bright child with a brave and compassionate heart and a sincere desire to do the right thing. Initially pushed aside by the ministers and courtiers who surround him, he strives to learn what he needs to know and do to be a good leader, and also to enjoy his childhood. Korczak's trenchant observations and dry humor show adult political hypocrisy and corruption in all their soiled ugliness. He brings the same grittiness to Matt's experiences in the war. Along the way, the child reader is introduced to some of the real problems of governance: economics, trade, traditions, laws, and political maneuvering. The adult reader is forced to confront the many ways in which people in power marginalize those without power, and adults marginalize children. Good intentions don't always work out for Matt, and he makes a lot of mistakes, but progressively learns from them, and we think that the ministers and courtiers begin to learn too.

For me the book falls apart after the war when King Matt visits the "cannibal nation". Korczak intends to show him forging international friendships and alliances, and broadening his horizons, but he relies on racial stereotyping to make his points about culture gaps. This part of the book reminds me of "Little Black Sambo" - both would be great adventure stories about plucky kids if only they weren't so thoroughly racist. Honestly, it makes me want to smack my head against a wall. You'd think Korczak, a Jewish Pole in the early 20th century, would have known better, but alas, he didn't. He saw the social customs and politics around him so clearly, but was entirely blind to the racism - or maybe by 1922 standards this part was also progressive. I don't know, and I don't want to make excuses for him. Suffice it to say that in 2015, this part of the book is problematic.

The end for Matt is grim - he is overthrown by a ministerial coup and ends up bound for exile on a desert island, a cliffhanger leading into a sequel. Unfortunately the sequel hasn't been translated into English - I would buy it just to see how Matt's story turns out.

There is another translation of this book now available on Amazon, entitled King Matthew the First. Here's hoping the new translators and illustrator will give us the sequel as well, before too long.
Fato
I was intrigued by the earlier reviewers who called this a great, classic children's book. It is unique in my experience of children's literature and I would agree that it is a classic, though one flawed for modern readers. It is written (or shall I say translated - I don't speak Polish) in an informal, narrative style that favors reading it aloud. This is the story of young Matt, who ascends to the throne as a young boy and progressively comes to terms with his powers and responsibilities as a leader. King Matt is a bright child with a brave and compassionate heart and a sincere desire to do the right thing. Initially pushed aside by the ministers and courtiers who surround him, he strives to learn what he needs to know and do to be a good leader, and also to enjoy his childhood. Korczak's trenchant observations and dry humor show adult political hypocrisy and corruption in all their soiled ugliness. He brings the same grittiness to Matt's experiences in the war. Along the way, the child reader is introduced to some of the real problems of governance: economics, trade, traditions, laws, and political maneuvering. The adult reader is forced to confront the many ways in which people in power marginalize those without power, and adults marginalize children. Good intentions don't always work out for Matt, and he makes a lot of mistakes, but progressively learns from them, and we think that the ministers and courtiers begin to learn too.

For me the book falls apart after the war when King Matt visits the "cannibal nation". Korczak intends to show him forging international friendships and alliances, and broadening his horizons, but he relies on racial stereotyping to make his points about culture gaps. This part of the book reminds me of "Little Black Sambo" - both would be great adventure stories about plucky kids if only they weren't so thoroughly racist. Honestly, it makes me want to smack my head against a wall. You'd think Korczak, a Jewish Pole in the early 20th century, would have known better, but alas, he didn't. He saw the social customs and politics around him so clearly, but was entirely blind to the racism - or maybe by 1922 standards this part was also progressive. I don't know, and I don't want to make excuses for him. Suffice it to say that in 2015, this part of the book is problematic.

The end for Matt is grim - he is overthrown by a ministerial coup and ends up bound for exile on a desert island, a cliffhanger leading into a sequel. Unfortunately the sequel hasn't been translated into English - I would buy it just to see how Matt's story turns out.

There is another translation of this book now available on Amazon, entitled King Matthew the First. Here's hoping the new translators and illustrator will give us the sequel as well, before too long.
Meztisho
Were one to associate a book and a fictional character with Janusz Korczak, it would certainly be Krol Macius, King Matthew. His likeness appeared on a series of Polish stamps commemorating his creator, along with a German post card. He saw himself as a leader, through the eyes of the child, King Matt. This is especially true of the often-related accounts of his final march through the Warsaw Ghetto, in silent protest providing comfort to the orphans in his care to the very end, as they boarded the cattle cars that would take them to Treblinka.

To understand both the story and the character of King Matt, it helps to be familiar with the author himself. Janusz Korczak was the pen name of Henryk Goldszmit, born July 20, 1879, in Warsaw, Poland. He was a quiet, thoughtful, studious young boy. Though he grew up in a comfortable, middle-class apartment, he was interested in playing with the working-class children of the street. Two events should have shattered his ideals. First, a group of street urchins teased the young Henryk mercilessly when he went outside to bury his beloved pet canary, taunting him with vicious anti-Semitic slurs. Second, Henryk's father succumbed to a psychiatric illness and had to be institutionalized, leaving the once prosperous family nearly penniless. Ever resourceful, Henryk turned those tragic events into opportunities, mainly by putting his love for children to use as a tutor for the children of the rich and poor alike, charging only what their parents could afford, even though the responsibility of supporting the family was primarily his.

In a similar vein, "King Matt," Matthew's father dies, suddenly leaving the responsibility of ruling the kingdom to the young boy. Poor Matt quickly realizes what a hostile place the adult world is for a child - a major theme in nearly every one of Korczak's writings. His ministers fight among themselves and try various tricks to deceive the boy king. Indeed, they question his authority, quite a reversal from the viewpoint of most adults, who are more concerned with children questioning their authority. Although the royal palace is teeming with officials and servants, Matt finds himself feeling very lonely indeed. That is, at least, until he befriends a boy at the edge of the royal gardens. Matt is very curious to find out more, so he disguises himself as a child of the palace under the false name Tomek. The boy introduces himself as Felek. They become good friends, but must do so in secrecy, as the palace elders deem it undesirable that the king associate himself with local working-class riff-raff. More than ever, Matt is convinced that, as king, he must rule his kingdom in a way that would be a good place for children, where they would be respected and taken seriously as, in the words of Korczak, "not people tomorrow, but people today." His reforms include carousels in every town, summer camps in the country that poor children might enjoy nature, toys and candy for those children who deserve but cannot afford such things. Further, children should have autonomy, a say in how things are run. Send the adults back to school and have the children work for a living. Of course, the adults protest about the boring work they have to endure in the schools. The people of his kingdom are not happy. And things become even worse, when the rulers of neighboring kingdoms declare war on King Matt. Matt (disguised as Tomek) and Felek go and fight on the front lines. Matt even undertakes a perilous journey to Africa to elicit the help of the cannibal king and his daughter, Klu Klu. As a side note, Korczak does not shy away from prejudice, among both the white and the black characters. After all, such prejudice is rampant in real life, a fact that Korczak himself knew all too well. (Some reviewers of this book who do not know about Korczak have accused him of bias, an unfair and untrue accusation.) Despite the mutual prejudices, Matt becomes close friends with Klu Klu and her royal father. Although King Matt wins the war against his neighboring aggressors, the adults in his kingdom rise in revolt and banish him to a desert island. Such a quick twist in plot - for the worse - is typical of Korczak's storytelling, but that does not make the author a cynic or pessimist. On the contrary, there is hope - only, we do not yet know what the future will bring.

Richard Lourie's translation in sympathetic and follows the style of Korczak faithfully. In the original hardcover edition, it was Bruno Bettelheim who introduced the book. Although Dr. Bettelheim was both a Holocaust survivor and an authority on children's literature (one should refer to his "The Uses of Enchantment"), many admirers of Korczak are deeply troubled by his questioning why Korczak led his charges to the trains to the Treblinka death camp like sheep to the slaughter and did not fight back. (He also posed the same question about Anne Frank, in a 1990 article.) I feel this criticism is entirely justified; Korczak dared resist the Nazi oppressors in multiple ways; fighting them was not how he chose to do so. For paperback edition, there is a new introduction by Esme Raji Codell, a strong advocate of engaging children in quality literature. Her enthusiasm for this beloved children's classic, which has been translated into many languages and adapted to films, plays, and cartoons all over Europe and elsewhere, is infectious. Let me end by quoting from Ms. Codell: "This book is a portrait of a child's attempts to give his best gifts to the world. It teaches grown-ups not only what children's literature can be, but what children can be."
Meztisho
Were one to associate a book and a fictional character with Janusz Korczak, it would certainly be Krol Macius, King Matthew. His likeness appeared on a series of Polish stamps commemorating his creator, along with a German post card. He saw himself as a leader, through the eyes of the child, King Matt. This is especially true of the often-related accounts of his final march through the Warsaw Ghetto, in silent protest providing comfort to the orphans in his care to the very end, as they boarded the cattle cars that would take them to Treblinka.

To understand both the story and the character of King Matt, it helps to be familiar with the author himself. Janusz Korczak was the pen name of Henryk Goldszmit, born July 20, 1879, in Warsaw, Poland. He was a quiet, thoughtful, studious young boy. Though he grew up in a comfortable, middle-class apartment, he was interested in playing with the working-class children of the street. Two events should have shattered his ideals. First, a group of street urchins teased the young Henryk mercilessly when he went outside to bury his beloved pet canary, taunting him with vicious anti-Semitic slurs. Second, Henryk's father succumbed to a psychiatric illness and had to be institutionalized, leaving the once prosperous family nearly penniless. Ever resourceful, Henryk turned those tragic events into opportunities, mainly by putting his love for children to use as a tutor for the children of the rich and poor alike, charging only what their parents could afford, even though the responsibility of supporting the family was primarily his.

In a similar vein, "King Matt," Matthew's father dies, suddenly leaving the responsibility of ruling the kingdom to the young boy. Poor Matt quickly realizes what a hostile place the adult world is for a child - a major theme in nearly every one of Korczak's writings. His ministers fight among themselves and try various tricks to deceive the boy king. Indeed, they question his authority, quite a reversal from the viewpoint of most adults, who are more concerned with children questioning their authority. Although the royal palace is teeming with officials and servants, Matt finds himself feeling very lonely indeed. That is, at least, until he befriends a boy at the edge of the royal gardens. Matt is very curious to find out more, so he disguises himself as a child of the palace under the false name Tomek. The boy introduces himself as Felek. They become good friends, but must do so in secrecy, as the palace elders deem it undesirable that the king associate himself with local working-class riff-raff. More than ever, Matt is convinced that, as king, he must rule his kingdom in a way that would be a good place for children, where they would be respected and taken seriously as, in the words of Korczak, "not people tomorrow, but people today." His reforms include carousels in every town, summer camps in the country that poor children might enjoy nature, toys and candy for those children who deserve but cannot afford such things. Further, children should have autonomy, a say in how things are run. Send the adults back to school and have the children work for a living. Of course, the adults protest about the boring work they have to endure in the schools. The people of his kingdom are not happy. And things become even worse, when the rulers of neighboring kingdoms declare war on King Matt. Matt (disguised as Tomek) and Felek go and fight on the front lines. Matt even undertakes a perilous journey to Africa to elicit the help of the cannibal king and his daughter, Klu Klu. As a side note, Korczak does not shy away from prejudice, among both the white and the black characters. After all, such prejudice is rampant in real life, a fact that Korczak himself knew all too well. (Some reviewers of this book who do not know about Korczak have accused him of bias, an unfair and untrue accusation.) Despite the mutual prejudices, Matt becomes close friends with Klu Klu and her royal father. Although King Matt wins the war against his neighboring aggressors, the adults in his kingdom rise in revolt and banish him to a desert island. Such a quick twist in plot - for the worse - is typical of Korczak's storytelling, but that does not make the author a cynic or pessimist. On the contrary, there is hope - only, we do not yet know what the future will bring.

Richard Lourie's translation in sympathetic and follows the style of Korczak faithfully. In the original hardcover edition, it was Bruno Bettelheim who introduced the book. Although Dr. Bettelheim was both a Holocaust survivor and an authority on children's literature (one should refer to his "The Uses of Enchantment"), many admirers of Korczak are deeply troubled by his questioning why Korczak led his charges to the trains to the Treblinka death camp like sheep to the slaughter and did not fight back. (He also posed the same question about Anne Frank, in a 1990 article.) I feel this criticism is entirely justified; Korczak dared resist the Nazi oppressors in multiple ways; fighting them was not how he chose to do so. For paperback edition, there is a new introduction by Esme Raji Codell, a strong advocate of engaging children in quality literature. Her enthusiasm for this beloved children's classic, which has been translated into many languages and adapted to films, plays, and cartoons all over Europe and elsewhere, is infectious. Let me end by quoting from Ms. Codell: "This book is a portrait of a child's attempts to give his best gifts to the world. It teaches grown-ups not only what children's literature can be, but what children can be."
Oghmaghma
My eight-year old daughter read this book and at first was put off by some of the themes. However, she persisted and found she enjoyed the book. The book was written by a Polish doctor around the time of WW II. Some of the things that are mentioned such as "hanging" and soldiers drinking vodka might have been more openly and matter of factly presented to children of that era and that locale. For a current day fairly sheltered child, these were eye-opening and not what is expected when one has been reading "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" and the like. After sticking with book for a few chapters, my daughter began to engage in the story of the boy who became a child ruler. She loved the humorous aspects of such a scenario. She found some of the situations that King Matt (child ruler) established such as children and adults trading places to be both funny and thought-provoking. I was surprised to find that the book made her think about the advantages and disadvantages of being a child and what it takes to be a good child or adult. Encourage your child to read a book that challenges her/him. The thoughts and questions that this book raised for my daughter will stay with her long after she has forgotten about Junie B Jones and the Wimpy Kid etc...
Oghmaghma
My eight-year old daughter read this book and at first was put off by some of the themes. However, she persisted and found she enjoyed the book. The book was written by a Polish doctor around the time of WW II. Some of the things that are mentioned such as "hanging" and soldiers drinking vodka might have been more openly and matter of factly presented to children of that era and that locale. For a current day fairly sheltered child, these were eye-opening and not what is expected when one has been reading "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" and the like. After sticking with book for a few chapters, my daughter began to engage in the story of the boy who became a child ruler. She loved the humorous aspects of such a scenario. She found some of the situations that King Matt (child ruler) established such as children and adults trading places to be both funny and thought-provoking. I was surprised to find that the book made her think about the advantages and disadvantages of being a child and what it takes to be a good child or adult. Encourage your child to read a book that challenges her/him. The thoughts and questions that this book raised for my daughter will stay with her long after she has forgotten about Junie B Jones and the Wimpy Kid etc...