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Totally Uncool (Carolrhoda Picture Books) epub download

by Chris Monroe,Janice Levy


Janice Levy and Chris Monroe's "Totally Uncool" doesn't tell what happened to the unnamed girl's mother, but this makes the ambiguous situation even more widely applicable. The girl, who looks around 6 or 7 years old, objects to Daddy's newest girlfriend-the one he calls "Sweet Potato.

Janice Levy and Chris Monroe's "Totally Uncool" doesn't tell what happened to the unnamed girl's mother, but this makes the ambiguous situation even more widely applicable. She keeps looking for something to criticize, even relatively minor differences: "She doesn't play soccer.

Totally Uncool by Janice Levy illustrated by Chris Monroe. t Carolrhoda Books, In. Minneapolis. This page intentionally left blank. Dad’s new girlfriend is weird. Reads poems that don’t rhyme. Falls asleep sitting up. Dad calls her Sweet Potato. I don’t call her anything. She doesn’t play soccer.

Start by marking Totally Uncool: Carolrhoda Picture Books as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Janice Levy and Chris Monroe's "Totally Uncool" doesn't tell what happened to the unnamed girl's mother, but . It is listed as being one of the best books published this year. Publicand school librarians use the CCBC for book selection, as well as teachers

Janice Levy and Chris Monroe's "Totally Uncool" doesn't tell what happened to the unnamed girl's mother, but this makes the ambiguous situation even more widely applicable. Publicand school librarians use the CCBC for book selection, as well as teachers. In all of Wisconsin and Iowa, it was considered one of the best picture books published this year.

Monroe has written and illustrated eight children’s books, including the Monkey with a Tool Belt series. She has also illustrated four books for other authors. Big Little Brother by Kevin Kling. Totally Uncool by Janice Levy. Big Little Mother by Kevin Kling. Trash Mountain by Jane Yolen. "Sneaky Sheep By Chris Monroe". "Best of the Twin Cities 1999: Best Local Cartoonist".

Totally Uncool is a clever and witty story with offbeat illustrations that bring to life the challenges of adjusting to a single parent's new companion. Totally Uncool - Janice Levy. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Lerner PublishingReleased: Jan 1, 1999ISBN: 9780822565420Format: book.

Illustrated by Chris Monroe. Ages 5 to 8) The narrator is complaining about her father's uncool new girlfriend, Sweet Potato. She plays the tuba, sings opera to her goldfish and reads poems that don't rhyme. But it turns out she has possibilities after all; she pays attention and doesn't stay mad.

The story addresses the subject of single father and his "new girlfriend" and how a young child can learn about a new relationship. In Simplified Chinese. Distributed by Tsai Fong Books, Inc. show more.

An educational children s book and electronic content publisher offering nonfiction and fiction books and . Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Bug on a Bike (Carolrhoda Picture Books).

An educational children s book and electronic content publisher offering nonfiction and fiction books and digital content for grades. Picture Book List Archives - Only Picture Books. Bug on a Bike (Carolrhoda Picture Books) by Chris Monroe. Georgetown Library Little Library New Children's Books Preschool Books Library Programs Book Reader Fiction Books Book Lists Free Books.

As she describes all the things that are "uncool" about her father's latest girlfriend, a young girl begins to admit that there are some things she likes about her

Totally Uncool (Carolrhoda Picture Books) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1575055558

ISBN: 1575055554

Author: Chris Monroe,Janice Levy

Category: Books for children

Subcategory: Growing Up & Facts of Life

Language: English

Publisher: Carolrhoda Books (March 1, 2001)

Pages: 32 pages

ePUB size: 1288 kb

FB2 size: 1513 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 508

Other Formats: rtf mobi mbr docx

Related to Totally Uncool (Carolrhoda Picture Books) ePub books

Beazekelv
The story is simple, but the issues complex: How do you accept your Daddy's new girlfriend? Janice Levy and Chris Monroe's "Totally Uncool" doesn't tell what happened to the unnamed girl's mother, but this makes the ambiguous situation even more widely applicable. The girl, who looks around 6 or 7 years old, objects to Daddy's newest girlfriend--the one he calls "Sweet Potato." She keeps looking for something to criticize, even relatively minor differences: "She doesn't play soccer. Or work out in a gym. Video games? She hasn't a clue." Then there are the slight idiosyncrasies that accompany almost any person: "She plays the tuba"...."Falls asleep sitting up"...."Her hair is porcupine"..."She sings opera to her goldfish." These observations supply much of the book's gentle humor.

Midway through the book, the girl begins to recognize and accept Sweet Potato's kind ways and understanding nature: "She listens to me without the TV on. Keeps my secrets secret..." "Lets me slam doors when things aren't fair. She never calls me stupid." "She doesn't yell when I forget things. Or drop things. Well, maybe just a little." On the last page, the daughter humanizes her by telling us her real name ("Elizabeth") and, smiling, concedes "Maybe there's hope for her yet."

The book shows and normalizes the difficulties inherent in such situations. Kids may see that their resentful feelings are natural, but that they can be balanced by the new adult's (sometimes overlooked) good qualities. The new adult can see the situation from the child's view, and may get some perspective on respecting each other's boundaries and providing emotional support. But "Totally Uncool" is not just for family situations such as this one. It shows that it's not always easy to build a friendship, and that one must try to balance the newcomer's seemingly "uncool" surface characteristics with an appreciation of that person's deeper, more fundamental nature. Monroe's informal, "crayonish" illustrations keep thing light and underscore the narrative child-centered perspective. This is an excellent book that skillfully and lightly explores the evolving adjustment to the family newcomer.
Beazekelv
The story is simple, but the issues complex: How do you accept your Daddy's new girlfriend? Janice Levy and Chris Monroe's "Totally Uncool" doesn't tell what happened to the unnamed girl's mother, but this makes the ambiguous situation even more widely applicable. The girl, who looks around 6 or 7 years old, objects to Daddy's newest girlfriend--the one he calls "Sweet Potato." She keeps looking for something to criticize, even relatively minor differences: "She doesn't play soccer. Or work out in a gym. Video games? She hasn't a clue." Then there are the slight idiosyncrasies that accompany almost any person: "She plays the tuba"...."Falls asleep sitting up"...."Her hair is porcupine"..."She sings opera to her goldfish." These observations supply much of the book's gentle humor.

Midway through the book, the girl begins to recognize and accept Sweet Potato's kind ways and understanding nature: "She listens to me without the TV on. Keeps my secrets secret..." "Lets me slam doors when things aren't fair. She never calls me stupid." "She doesn't yell when I forget things. Or drop things. Well, maybe just a little." On the last page, the daughter humanizes her by telling us her real name ("Elizabeth") and, smiling, concedes "Maybe there's hope for her yet."

The book shows and normalizes the difficulties inherent in such situations. Kids may see that their resentful feelings are natural, but that they can be balanced by the new adult's (sometimes overlooked) good qualities. The new adult can see the situation from the child's view, and may get some perspective on respecting each other's boundaries and providing emotional support. But "Totally Uncool" is not just for family situations such as this one. It shows that it's not always easy to build a friendship, and that one must try to balance the newcomer's seemingly "uncool" surface characteristics with an appreciation of that person's deeper, more fundamental nature. Monroe's informal, "crayonish" illustrations keep thing light and underscore the narrative child-centered perspective. This is an excellent book that skillfully and lightly explores the evolving adjustment to the family newcomer.
Roram
This is a wonderful book for a stepmom to sit down and read with a stepdaughter. The stepdaughter in this book really doesn't seem to care for her new stepmom at all, until she realizes towards the end that "Sweet Potato" (as her father fondly calls her) is really quite a cool stepmom after all. This book deals with the stepchildrens feelings surrounding acceptance of the stepmom. It doesn't push the child emotionally but gently guides them to a better place emotionally with regards to their stepparent. It also helps to debunk the myth surrounding the "stepmom"as mean, or evil. Children who may have loyalty issues or fears would definitely benefit from this book. "Totally Uncool" also dispells the stereotypical mental image of the stepmom! "Sweet Potato" has porcupiny hair, wears sneakers with skirts, plays the tuba, sings opera, and claps the loudest at the school plays.
This might be a nice holiday gift for any stepdaughter.
Roram
This is a wonderful book for a stepmom to sit down and read with a stepdaughter. The stepdaughter in this book really doesn't seem to care for her new stepmom at all, until she realizes towards the end that "Sweet Potato" (as her father fondly calls her) is really quite a cool stepmom after all. This book deals with the stepchildrens feelings surrounding acceptance of the stepmom. It doesn't push the child emotionally but gently guides them to a better place emotionally with regards to their stepparent. It also helps to debunk the myth surrounding the "stepmom"as mean, or evil. Children who may have loyalty issues or fears would definitely benefit from this book. "Totally Uncool" also dispells the stereotypical mental image of the stepmom! "Sweet Potato" has porcupiny hair, wears sneakers with skirts, plays the tuba, sings opera, and claps the loudest at the school plays.
This might be a nice holiday gift for any stepdaughter.