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Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss epub download

by Philip Carlo


Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso is currently serving thirteen consecutive life sentences plus 455 . Another great book from Phil Carlo.

Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso is currently serving thirteen consecutive life sentences plus 455 years at a federal prison in Colorado. True-crime veteran Carlo (The Iceman: Confessions of a Mafia Contract Killer, 2006, et. chronicles the extraordinary life of Lucchese family underboss Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso. This is a quick, and excellent read.

Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss. Five Families: The Rise, Decline, and Resurgence of America's Most Powerful Mafia Empires. This book is by NO MEANS light reading, but if you are interested in true crime, the inner workings of a criminal organization, psychology and the inner workings of a true psychopath, or just want some interesting bathroom reading, Philip Carlo, as always, delivers with The Ice Man. 5 people found this helpful.

Casso later told biographer Philip Carlo that his father visited him at the police station and tried in vain to scare his son straight. Penguin Books Canada, Limited. Carlo, Philip (2008). Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss. New York: HarperCollins. He soon caught the eye of Christopher "Christie Tick" Furnari, the capo of the "19th Hole Crew" in the Lucchese family. Casso started his career in the Mafia as a loanshark.

Henry hill goodfella artwork and personal items. PagesCommunity s OrganizationPhilip Carlo-GASPIPE: CONFESSIONS OF A MAFIA BOSS(Anthony Casso). English (US) · Suomi · Svenska · Español · Português (Brasil). Information about Page Insights Data.

Автор: Carlo Philip Название: Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss Издательство: HarperCollins USA .

This book should have been titled Gaspipe: Delusions of a Mafia Boss. That is how it reads. This is Casso's version of events during his reign as a deranged mobster. After reading The Ice Man: Confessions of a Mafia Contract Killer, a few years ago, I was looking forward for more Philip Carlo's writing, but it seems like he is one hit wonder with The Ice Man. The author doesn't really go in depth with Gaspipe and his other book, The Butcher. Unlike his first debut best seller (Richard Kuklinski's story), it seems like he wrote the two latter books just because to fulfill his contract with the publisher.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The boss of New York's infamous Lucchese crime family, Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso's life in the Mafia was preordained from birth. His rare talent for ingenious schemes to hijack trucks, rob banks, and bring vast quantities of drugs into New York-fueled his unstoppable rise up the ladder of organized crime.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss" .

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. From his blood feud with John Gotti to his dealings with the "Mafia cops," decorated NYPD officers Lou Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa, to the Windows case, which marked the beginning of the end for the New York Mob, Gaspipe is Anthony Casso's shocking story-a roller-coaster ride into an exclusive netherworld that reveals the true inner workings of the Mafia, from.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss by. .Now, he has given bestselling author Philip Carlo the most intimate look into the world of La Cosa Nostra ever seen

Now, he has given bestselling author Philip Carlo the most intimate look into the world of La Cosa Nostra ever seen. Casso concocted ingenious schemes to hijack trucks, rob banks and traffic vast quantities of marijuana and heroin - shattering the myth that the Mafia didn't handle drugs. He also worked with the other Mafia families and forged strong ties with the Russian mob. He was bringing in so much cash that he had dozens of large safety-deposit boxes filled with bricks of hundred-dollar bills.

The boss of New York's infamous Lucchese crime family, Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso's life in the Mafia was preordained from birth. His rare talent for "earning"—concocting ingenious schemes to hijack trucks, rob banks, and bring vast quantities of drugs into New York—fueled his unstoppable rise up the ladder of organized crime. A mafioso responsible for at least fifty murders, Casso lived large, with a beautiful wife and money to burn. When the law finally caught up with him in 1994, Casso became the thing he hated most—an informer.

From his blood feud with John Gotti to his dealings with the "Mafia cops," decorated NYPD officers Lou Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa, to the Windows case, which marked the beginning of the end for the New York Mob, Gaspipe is Anthony Casso's shocking story—a roller-coaster ride into an exclusive netherworld that reveals the true inner workings of the Mafia, from its inception to the present time.

Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss epub download

ISBN13: 978-0061429859

ISBN: 0061429856

Author: Philip Carlo

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Specific Groups

Language: English

Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Reprint edition (June 23, 2009)

Pages: 384 pages

ePUB size: 1180 kb

FB2 size: 1992 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 482

Other Formats: lit lrf mbr azw

Related to Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss ePub books

Tygrafym
Firstly, let me say that this is an entertaining read, although certainly not for it's quality of writing. As the tenth mafia book I have read (including both general books such and biographies on scarpa, massino, leonetti etc.) this is undoubtably the most biased one of them all. It would be hard for any writer to make casso's story dull, yet Carlo maintains an apologist writing style throughout the entire book. Continually (and somewhat troublingly accepting) Carlo justifies casso's murders even when they include innocent, non-mafia related deaths. The entire book seems to have come entirely from gaspipe's point of view, with little insight from those associated with him. This leads to a vacancy in the book of many of the particularly gruesome details of casso's acts, which can be heard from testimony of those who knew him best. In reality, casso spiraled into a vivacious psychopathic killer who would do literally anything to save himself, yet Carlo never budges in his writing even when gaspipe blatantly violates rules which previously validated him earlier in the book. If your looking for a good story then I'd go for it, but not if you want an unbiased story of this man.
Tygrafym
Firstly, let me say that this is an entertaining read, although certainly not for it's quality of writing. As the tenth mafia book I have read (including both general books such and biographies on scarpa, massino, leonetti etc.) this is undoubtably the most biased one of them all. It would be hard for any writer to make casso's story dull, yet Carlo maintains an apologist writing style throughout the entire book. Continually (and somewhat troublingly accepting) Carlo justifies casso's murders even when they include innocent, non-mafia related deaths. The entire book seems to have come entirely from gaspipe's point of view, with little insight from those associated with him. This leads to a vacancy in the book of many of the particularly gruesome details of casso's acts, which can be heard from testimony of those who knew him best. In reality, casso spiraled into a vivacious psychopathic killer who would do literally anything to save himself, yet Carlo never budges in his writing even when gaspipe blatantly violates rules which previously validated him earlier in the book. If your looking for a good story then I'd go for it, but not if you want an unbiased story of this man.
Coiril
Errors. That was one of the words I would use to describe this book.

I'm familiar with the works of Philip Carlo, as I was a reader and defender of his book on "The Ice Man" Richard Kuklinski. Obviously, as a long-time student and historian of the Mob, I'd waited for someone to tell the Anthony Casso story for years, the closest anyone coming being Selwyn Raab's amazing "Five Families." Well, someone tried.

First, the positives. It's an engrossing book if you read it as entertainment. You do go inside the head of Anthony Casso, which is not a great place to be if you're sane. The book looks at the Casso/Amuso regime of the Lucchese family, as well as fills in some blanks in Casso's early years. Casso does come off as somewhat sympathetic, and if you don't know the real stories as told multiple times in other books, you would really find yourself rooting for Casso.

However, that is far outweighed by the negatives. Let me start with probably my biggest pet peeve: The identification of Frank DeCicco as John Gotti's right-hand man.

This is pure laziness on all parts: Carlo for faithfully printing this, and the editors for not catching this. DeCicco was NOT Gotti's right hand man, he was a loyal captain to Paul Castellano until Castellano went crazy over Gloria Olarte and started making bad moves. DeCicco is even in the "Last Supper" picture of Castellano and the hierarchy of the family...which he would not have been had he actually been with Gotti, who Castellano absolutely hated. How does anyone miss this?

Also, Carlo really paints Casso as a great man who was being recruited by every family. The problem here being, Casso was, in fact, a sociopath who actually set in motion the ambush on him by simply being himself. (And according to more than one story, killing James Hydell's dog.)

Carlo pretty much slides by the murder of Nicholas Guido as well, which is a cardinal sin, since Casso's reaction to that would have been interesting to note. According to "Five Families" though, Casso's reaction is actually "No big deal. That happens."

Vic Amuso also takes a huge backseat to Casso in this story (Understandable, since it is Casso's story, but also completely ridiculous, since Casso and Amuso were best friends.) Casso's tale that he told Antonio Corallo to make Amuso the boss is absolutely ludicrous.

Also, a lot of this story is not told, and there are plenty more errors that you have to read the book to figure out. One word of warning: Carlo really showers Casso with lots of superlatives. This book is Philip Carlo's epitaph. It should have been a masterpiece. Instead, it's a quite flawed book where almost all the other characters are cardboard puppets. We're left, at the end of the book, asking "What is the REAL story?" Because no outlaw, no matter how charismatic, could be this good.
Coiril
Errors. That was one of the words I would use to describe this book.

I'm familiar with the works of Philip Carlo, as I was a reader and defender of his book on "The Ice Man" Richard Kuklinski. Obviously, as a long-time student and historian of the Mob, I'd waited for someone to tell the Anthony Casso story for years, the closest anyone coming being Selwyn Raab's amazing "Five Families." Well, someone tried.

First, the positives. It's an engrossing book if you read it as entertainment. You do go inside the head of Anthony Casso, which is not a great place to be if you're sane. The book looks at the Casso/Amuso regime of the Lucchese family, as well as fills in some blanks in Casso's early years. Casso does come off as somewhat sympathetic, and if you don't know the real stories as told multiple times in other books, you would really find yourself rooting for Casso.

However, that is far outweighed by the negatives. Let me start with probably my biggest pet peeve: The identification of Frank DeCicco as John Gotti's right-hand man.

This is pure laziness on all parts: Carlo for faithfully printing this, and the editors for not catching this. DeCicco was NOT Gotti's right hand man, he was a loyal captain to Paul Castellano until Castellano went crazy over Gloria Olarte and started making bad moves. DeCicco is even in the "Last Supper" picture of Castellano and the hierarchy of the family...which he would not have been had he actually been with Gotti, who Castellano absolutely hated. How does anyone miss this?

Also, Carlo really paints Casso as a great man who was being recruited by every family. The problem here being, Casso was, in fact, a sociopath who actually set in motion the ambush on him by simply being himself. (And according to more than one story, killing James Hydell's dog.)

Carlo pretty much slides by the murder of Nicholas Guido as well, which is a cardinal sin, since Casso's reaction to that would have been interesting to note. According to "Five Families" though, Casso's reaction is actually "No big deal. That happens."

Vic Amuso also takes a huge backseat to Casso in this story (Understandable, since it is Casso's story, but also completely ridiculous, since Casso and Amuso were best friends.) Casso's tale that he told Antonio Corallo to make Amuso the boss is absolutely ludicrous.

Also, a lot of this story is not told, and there are plenty more errors that you have to read the book to figure out. One word of warning: Carlo really showers Casso with lots of superlatives. This book is Philip Carlo's epitaph. It should have been a masterpiece. Instead, it's a quite flawed book where almost all the other characters are cardboard puppets. We're left, at the end of the book, asking "What is the REAL story?" Because no outlaw, no matter how charismatic, could be this good.
Thundershaper
Other reviewers have gone into detail better, but Carlo (RIP) was a mediocre writer at best. Too many factual errors throughout the book. He did not do his research. Al D'Acro's (Carlo mentions him by the wrong name a few times) book paints a better picture of Casso - a psychopath not someone that deserves any pity whatsoever. Carlo wrote like a teenager. I wish someone else (Capeci, DeStefano, etc.) wrote Casso's story because it is truly interesting. Disappointed.
Thundershaper
Other reviewers have gone into detail better, but Carlo (RIP) was a mediocre writer at best. Too many factual errors throughout the book. He did not do his research. Al D'Acro's (Carlo mentions him by the wrong name a few times) book paints a better picture of Casso - a psychopath not someone that deserves any pity whatsoever. Carlo wrote like a teenager. I wish someone else (Capeci, DeStefano, etc.) wrote Casso's story because it is truly interesting. Disappointed.
Uaha
Sometimes you meet people who like to romanticize the American Mafia. They'll paint a glamorous portrait of a Robin Hood society of men who just rob from the elite and protect their own. Since being immortalized in Mario Puzo's classic 'The Godfather', this has become the accepted view from people who get hypnotized by the myth and lore surrounding Cosa Nostra. Yet the reality, as most sane individuals comprehend, is LCN is anything but romantic. Phil Carlo's 'Gaspipe' reminds us of this reality. Anthony Casso, former underboss and acting boss of the Lucchese crime family, was a vicious Brooklyn thug who quickly rose the ranks of the New York Mafia with murder and intimidation like a shrewd dictator hellbent on power and wealth. With Vittorio "Little Vic" Amuso, an equally cold and cunning mobster, Casso was well-known to a lot of us in the NYC area for his employing of two very corrupt NYPD detectives, Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa, as contract killers, a fact sensationalized by the media at the time it was exposed. The FBI soon comes knocking, and Gaspipe's inevitable downfall comes full force.

Carlo, who was once a childhood friend of Casso's which continued into adulthood, writes a meaty true-life mob tale of the rise-and-fall of one of New York's most notorious crime bosses in his classic style of short, sweet and to-the-point. Some criticize Phil's sometimes exotic adjectives and overly dramatic way of storytelling but IMHO, this isn't something done in poor taste. Overall if you're hungry for a juicy Mafia book this will satisfy the craving.
Uaha
Sometimes you meet people who like to romanticize the American Mafia. They'll paint a glamorous portrait of a Robin Hood society of men who just rob from the elite and protect their own. Since being immortalized in Mario Puzo's classic 'The Godfather', this has become the accepted view from people who get hypnotized by the myth and lore surrounding Cosa Nostra. Yet the reality, as most sane individuals comprehend, is LCN is anything but romantic. Phil Carlo's 'Gaspipe' reminds us of this reality. Anthony Casso, former underboss and acting boss of the Lucchese crime family, was a vicious Brooklyn thug who quickly rose the ranks of the New York Mafia with murder and intimidation like a shrewd dictator hellbent on power and wealth. With Vittorio "Little Vic" Amuso, an equally cold and cunning mobster, Casso was well-known to a lot of us in the NYC area for his employing of two very corrupt NYPD detectives, Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa, as contract killers, a fact sensationalized by the media at the time it was exposed. The FBI soon comes knocking, and Gaspipe's inevitable downfall comes full force.

Carlo, who was once a childhood friend of Casso's which continued into adulthood, writes a meaty true-life mob tale of the rise-and-fall of one of New York's most notorious crime bosses in his classic style of short, sweet and to-the-point. Some criticize Phil's sometimes exotic adjectives and overly dramatic way of storytelling but IMHO, this isn't something done in poor taste. Overall if you're hungry for a juicy Mafia book this will satisfy the craving.
Shem
I have read a lot of books on the mob and found this book to be a great addition to my collection. It is very thorough of 'Gaspipes` life and crimes. He seems to be honest to the author as they knew each other. Gaspipes downfall was trusting US Attorneys when he decided to flip. He still says he never ratted on anyone and is serving an eternal sentence. Anyhow great read if you like mob books and storing about their crimes. Gaspipe tells all here.
Shem
I have read a lot of books on the mob and found this book to be a great addition to my collection. It is very thorough of 'Gaspipes` life and crimes. He seems to be honest to the author as they knew each other. Gaspipes downfall was trusting US Attorneys when he decided to flip. He still says he never ratted on anyone and is serving an eternal sentence. Anyhow great read if you like mob books and storing about their crimes. Gaspipe tells all here.
Vudojar
Interesting anecdotes but the author is not objective and his argument towards the end that this guy is getting a bad deal ignores the people that were tortured and murdered.
Vudojar
Interesting anecdotes but the author is not objective and his argument towards the end that this guy is getting a bad deal ignores the people that were tortured and murdered.