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My Life and Work - An Autobiography of Henry Ford epub download

by Henry Ford


Henry Ford was the founder of Ford Motor Company

Henry Ford was the founder of Ford Motor Company. The autobiography goes through Henry Ford’s career, beginning with the initial inception of his idea for building a motor car. Throughout the book, Ford gives a very raw, real, and transparent view of his life, and in particular his thought processes when making major decisions. You can really see how Ford was not only a successful businessman, but also an excellent engineer, tactician, and strategist. Combined with these technical knowledge he was also skilled with handling and connecting with people: everyday communicating, marketing, sales, and everything in between.

Overall, there are probably many other books other than My Life and Work that would better fill the need of a good Ford history during the Henry Ford years.

The innovations to business and direct impact on "My Life and Work" is the autobiography of Henry Ford. Written in conjunction with Samuel Crowther, "My Life and Work" chronicles the rise and success of one of the greatest American entrepreneurs and businessmen.

The reason why Bolshevism did not work, and cannot work, is not economic.

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. Written in Collaboration With Samuel Crowther. The reason why Bolshevism did not work, and cannot work, is not economic.

My Life and Work is the autobiography of Henry Ford. Written in conjunction with Samuel Crowther, My Life and Work chronicles the rise and success of one of the greatest American entrepreneurs and businessmen. The innovations to business and direct impact on the American economy of Henry Ford and his company are immeasurable. His story is brilliantly chronicled in this classic American biography. Free Business Biographies.

An Autobiography of Henry Ford" Ford . This book is the original autobiographical work by Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Company. In this book, Ford details how he got into business, the strategies that he used to become a wealthy and successful businessman, and what others can do by learning from the examples he has outlined. This book should be read by small business owners, business students and those interested in the history of the automobile.

My Life and Work" is the autobiography of Henry Ford. Written in conjunction with Samuel Crowther, "My Life and Work" chronicles the rise and success of one of the greatest American entrepreneurs and businessmen

My Life and Work" is the autobiography of Henry Ford.

Henry Ford was the founder of the Ford Motors Company, had brought a revolution in the automobile industry. This biography of Henry Ford provides detailed information about his childhood, life, achievements, works & timeline. Birthday: July 30, 1863.

My Life and Work written by Henry Ford is the autobiography of the founder of the Ford Motor Company. In My Life and Work Henry Ford details his strategies and philosophies for life and business. The same strategies and philosophies that allowed him to rise to the top of his industry and in the process made him one of the most successful and wealthiest entrepreneurs that America has ever produced. My Life and Work by Henry Ford is a very inspiring book and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

My Life and Work - An Autobiography of Henry Ford epub download

ISBN13: 978-1442144323

ISBN: 1442144327

Author: Henry Ford

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Professionals & Academics

Language: English

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 20, 2009)

Pages: 214 pages

ePUB size: 1515 kb

FB2 size: 1624 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 154

Other Formats: lrf docx rtf azw

Related to My Life and Work - An Autobiography of Henry Ford ePub books

Braendo
Toyota clearly followed Henry Ford;s ideas and recognized him as the innovator.
Reading the early history of the auto industry with Ford's assessments should be required reading before going after "Lean Certification" as they now call the logistics optimization part of the "Toyota Production System" in my opinion. The entire industry globally was about making racing vehicles. Ford saw the opportunity to go after the mass market but in careful steps to avoid need for financing. Each factory created the cash for the next much larger factory near Detroit. But he did not do that by making "cheap" cars, he did it by engineering the lighter and stronger vanadium steels he found from parts lying around the race tracks from a French racer. Then making just ONE model at a time with continuous improvements. 2, 4 and 6 cylinder models eventually..only in black but serviceable as evidenced by long life of Model A's for example.
Braendo
Toyota clearly followed Henry Ford;s ideas and recognized him as the innovator.
Reading the early history of the auto industry with Ford's assessments should be required reading before going after "Lean Certification" as they now call the logistics optimization part of the "Toyota Production System" in my opinion. The entire industry globally was about making racing vehicles. Ford saw the opportunity to go after the mass market but in careful steps to avoid need for financing. Each factory created the cash for the next much larger factory near Detroit. But he did not do that by making "cheap" cars, he did it by engineering the lighter and stronger vanadium steels he found from parts lying around the race tracks from a French racer. Then making just ONE model at a time with continuous improvements. 2, 4 and 6 cylinder models eventually..only in black but serviceable as evidenced by long life of Model A's for example.
Malogamand
I just finished Henry Ford's Autobiography "My Life and Work" and was quite surprised by it. Other that 3 or 4 pages where he wonders about the "Jewish Problem" (which I would skip if I were you), the rest of the book was astounding. If all businesses were run the way he lays out in the book, the world would be a much better place. He stated that he believed that the purpose of a business was to serve the world in the best way possible while providing employment and compensation at a level that would enable a worker the ability to purchase every need he (or she) had. The way he describes the average worker is astounding coming from a "Captain of Industry". He also proposes the proper place for money, finance, lawyers, and managers. I was completely, and happily, blown away by his vision. Too bad as soon as he retired Ford became like every other company and through most of his ideas out of the window.
Malogamand
I just finished Henry Ford's Autobiography "My Life and Work" and was quite surprised by it. Other that 3 or 4 pages where he wonders about the "Jewish Problem" (which I would skip if I were you), the rest of the book was astounding. If all businesses were run the way he lays out in the book, the world would be a much better place. He stated that he believed that the purpose of a business was to serve the world in the best way possible while providing employment and compensation at a level that would enable a worker the ability to purchase every need he (or she) had. The way he describes the average worker is astounding coming from a "Captain of Industry". He also proposes the proper place for money, finance, lawyers, and managers. I was completely, and happily, blown away by his vision. Too bad as soon as he retired Ford became like every other company and through most of his ideas out of the window.
Coiril
This book is less an autobiography than an education in business and economics with a unique philosophy. It is a great mirror to hold up to our current business practices and economic life. Reading between the lines, it is a warning to the leveraged buyout crowd and an incentive to our economic policy makers to think again.

Henry Ford has been much ridiculed and vilified. True, he was critical of much and expressed himself very strongly. He was anti-Semitic. This was not unusual in his day. This book has none of that, but you can see one source of his enmity – the banks. Then, as now, the Jewish participation in commercial and investment banks was very pronounced. Ford felt that allowing bankers in led to a loss of control and running a business in a way far different from his philosophy. He was not very positive about lawyers either.

Henry Ford is also admired for the “assembly line” system of manufacturing, which he admits he got from observing a slaughterhouse operation. Ford is also known for going a long time without changing models and lowering his prices (along what we now call the learning curve). He looked for constant manufacturing and engineering improvement (what the Japanese call “kaizen”). Also, like the Japanese in later generations, he pioneered “just in time” inventories.

His goal was to supply simple high quality products at prices anyone could afford. Meanwhile, he raised the average worker’s wages to unprecedented heights and instituted companywide “social services” and a unique brand of vocational education for the young. In many ways he was neither a capitalist nor conservative. Rather he was a progressive thinker for his time and a “distributivist” rather than a socialist. One might wonder whether his philosophy, if generally implemented, would have prevented the slew of economic and industrial problems experienced since the 1930s, but it certainly justifies listening to his views and considering them seriously.

Autobiography is not missing here. I enjoyed Ford’s description of his friendships with Thomas Edison, Harvey Firestone, and the naturalist John Burroughs. I recall being taught in school or elsewhere that Ford was a poor farm boy who became a mechanic and invented a car in his garage. This is misleading. His father was an affluent farmer who gave his son a nice farm eventually. Ford did not like farm work and always was looking for ways to do things efficiently. This led him to mechanics and he was not like your corner garage mechanic. He became interested in gasoline engines and perfecting them. He was more what we would call a machinist. Moreover, through self-study and practice he became what we would call an engineer. He held responsible management jobs with a steam tractor company and Detroit Edison. While doing these things he tinkered on his own time with his original automobiles. His forward thinking is illustrated by his thoughts on why corn should be used to make “tractor fuel.” Sounds pretty modern to the ethanol crowd.

My only problem with this book is that the paragraphs are too darn long, but that's the way folks used to write.

I came away from this book with a renewed interest in Ford, a fascinating personality. His thoughts and “credo” about business and society and the proper place of the industrialist are well worth knowing and considering. They are as relevant today as 100 years ago. If you are in business management there is even more to think about and compare with what is taught in today’s business schools. If you worry about a world awash in debt and influenced by “bankers” and leveraged buy-out artists this book will give you more food for thought.
Coiril
This book is less an autobiography than an education in business and economics with a unique philosophy. It is a great mirror to hold up to our current business practices and economic life. Reading between the lines, it is a warning to the leveraged buyout crowd and an incentive to our economic policy makers to think again.

Henry Ford has been much ridiculed and vilified. True, he was critical of much and expressed himself very strongly. He was anti-Semitic. This was not unusual in his day. This book has none of that, but you can see one source of his enmity – the banks. Then, as now, the Jewish participation in commercial and investment banks was very pronounced. Ford felt that allowing bankers in led to a loss of control and running a business in a way far different from his philosophy. He was not very positive about lawyers either.

Henry Ford is also admired for the “assembly line” system of manufacturing, which he admits he got from observing a slaughterhouse operation. Ford is also known for going a long time without changing models and lowering his prices (along what we now call the learning curve). He looked for constant manufacturing and engineering improvement (what the Japanese call “kaizen”). Also, like the Japanese in later generations, he pioneered “just in time” inventories.

His goal was to supply simple high quality products at prices anyone could afford. Meanwhile, he raised the average worker’s wages to unprecedented heights and instituted companywide “social services” and a unique brand of vocational education for the young. In many ways he was neither a capitalist nor conservative. Rather he was a progressive thinker for his time and a “distributivist” rather than a socialist. One might wonder whether his philosophy, if generally implemented, would have prevented the slew of economic and industrial problems experienced since the 1930s, but it certainly justifies listening to his views and considering them seriously.

Autobiography is not missing here. I enjoyed Ford’s description of his friendships with Thomas Edison, Harvey Firestone, and the naturalist John Burroughs. I recall being taught in school or elsewhere that Ford was a poor farm boy who became a mechanic and invented a car in his garage. This is misleading. His father was an affluent farmer who gave his son a nice farm eventually. Ford did not like farm work and always was looking for ways to do things efficiently. This led him to mechanics and he was not like your corner garage mechanic. He became interested in gasoline engines and perfecting them. He was more what we would call a machinist. Moreover, through self-study and practice he became what we would call an engineer. He held responsible management jobs with a steam tractor company and Detroit Edison. While doing these things he tinkered on his own time with his original automobiles. His forward thinking is illustrated by his thoughts on why corn should be used to make “tractor fuel.” Sounds pretty modern to the ethanol crowd.

My only problem with this book is that the paragraphs are too darn long, but that's the way folks used to write.

I came away from this book with a renewed interest in Ford, a fascinating personality. His thoughts and “credo” about business and society and the proper place of the industrialist are well worth knowing and considering. They are as relevant today as 100 years ago. If you are in business management there is even more to think about and compare with what is taught in today’s business schools. If you worry about a world awash in debt and influenced by “bankers” and leveraged buy-out artists this book will give you more food for thought.
Buzatus
Amazing story of one of the first great industrialists ever. Henry Ford was a true entrepreneur who understood extremely well the very fundamentals of business and industry.

He expresses his ideas clearly and directly breaking paradigms of the time. It is surprising that still today his basic concepts are not widely accepted by some people.

Worth read.
Buzatus
Amazing story of one of the first great industrialists ever. Henry Ford was a true entrepreneur who understood extremely well the very fundamentals of business and industry.

He expresses his ideas clearly and directly breaking paradigms of the time. It is surprising that still today his basic concepts are not widely accepted by some people.

Worth read.