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Intern: A Doctor's Initiation epub download

by Sandeep Jaubar


Sandeep reveals himself in this book as he takes us on a wondrous journey through one of the most difficult years of his life

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Sandeep reveals himself in this book as he takes us on a wondrous journey through one of the most difficult years of his life. It is mandatory reading for anyone who has been even the slightest bit curious about how a doctor gets trained, and for physicians, it is a valuable record of our initiation. Sanjay Gupta, CNN medical correspondent and author of Chasing Life. Intern will resonate not only with doctors, but with anyone who has struggled with the grand question: ‘what should I do with my life?'

Intern : a doctor's initiation. by. Jauhar, Sandeep, 1968-.

Intern : a doctor's initiation. Jauhar, Sandeep, 1968-, Jauhar, Sandeep, 1968-, Medical students, Interns (Medicine), Residents (Medicine), Physicians, Internship and Residency. New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Uploaded by Sanderia on November 16, 2010.

Intern: A Doctor's Initiation. Jauhar's book tells the story of how his year of internship transformed him from a fearful beginner to a doctor with confidence and skills. Sandeep Jauhar (Goodreads Author). Intern: A Doctor’s Initiation is at times shouting in your face with brutal hot pink honesty bringing back memories of me and my brother accidentally seeing a cadaver at Rio Hondo Hospital. This memory was similar to what made Dr. Jauhar vomit in-between patients. I read Intern not long after reading The Intern Blues. The contrast between the two books is striking.

In a book filled with colorful medical anecdotes, Dr. Jauhar’s own case stands out. Half the time it’s not clear whether he should be treating others or others should be treating . A Doctor’s Initiation. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Half the time it’s not clear whether he should be treating others or others should be treating him, which does in fact happen when he develops a herniated disc midway through his training, complicated by a deep depression associated with a rolling existential crisis. Residency-and especially the first year, called internship-is legendary for its brutality. Working eighty hours or more per week, most new doctors spend their first year asking themselves why they wanted to be doctors in the first place.

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Распространяем знания с 2009. Primary Category: Literature, Nonfiction. We learn in the introduction to the book that the author will speak freely of self-doubt about career choice, constant anxiety and feelings of inadequacy, exhaustion, and disillusionment

Intern: A Doctor's Initiation. We learn in the introduction to the book that the author will speak freely of self-doubt about career choice, constant anxiety and feelings of inadequacy, exhaustion, and disillusionment. Which indeed he does. in plant genetics, now writing academic textbooks and still regretting that he had not been able to afford his dream of becoming a doctor; mother helping to support the family as a lab technician; older brother, Rajiv

Intern: A Doctor's Initiation

Intern: A Doctor's Initiation epub download

ISBN13: 978-0143063827

ISBN: 0143063820

Author: Sandeep Jaubar

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Memoirs

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Books India (March 7, 2008)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB size: 1813 kb

FB2 size: 1906 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 634

Other Formats: lit lrf docx rtf

Related to Intern: A Doctor's Initiation ePub books

Hamrl
For me, reading this memoir was an experience of intense immersion in the author's psyche as he navigates the process of development psychologists call identity formation. He spends an unusually long time in the "moratorium" phase of that process, in which there's an active but uncommitted exploration of differing personal values and roles. He's an apt observer of his inner world, so his memoir, though titled "Intern," is really less another general story about the rigors of becoming a doctor and more a very individual narrative of coming of age. As the main character of his story, he's a brilliant and brooding young man defying his family's expectations that he'll follow in his older brother's footsteps to become a doctor (preferably a prestigious and highly paid specialist) by instead pursuing postgraduate studies in theoretical physics (but not before detours to get accepted by all the best law schools and travels to undertake challenging volunteer work abroad). In spite of his self-assessment that he isn't quite brilliant enough to do theoretical physics, he goes on to write a dissertation on quantum dots. But his restlessness doesn't abate. He suffers angst and anomie from feeling more oriented to the random quantum than to the orderly classical world. It's a crisis of meaning and of personal significance. He wants to stop thinking and start acting. So he finally makes his parents happy by going to medical school ... and (as written in the stars at his birth) on to a crisis of self-confrontation in his internship, a decidedly nonacademic environment where he immediately senses he doesn't fit in and feels overwhelmed by having to act without thinking.

He is a very good writer. He has a wonderful way of introducing simple concepts from physics as metaphoric bridges to help himself (and his readers) creatively reconceptualize a personal or medical problem so that he (we) can understand it and/or find solutions (sometimes the solution is just the understanding). There is no real end to a memoir--a self-reflective person will go on learning from experience and growing--but I doubt the core traits that make this hero of his own story (as we all are) turn inward, introspect, brood, and challenge himself again and again will let him rest for very long.
Hamrl
For me, reading this memoir was an experience of intense immersion in the author's psyche as he navigates the process of development psychologists call identity formation. He spends an unusually long time in the "moratorium" phase of that process, in which there's an active but uncommitted exploration of differing personal values and roles. He's an apt observer of his inner world, so his memoir, though titled "Intern," is really less another general story about the rigors of becoming a doctor and more a very individual narrative of coming of age. As the main character of his story, he's a brilliant and brooding young man defying his family's expectations that he'll follow in his older brother's footsteps to become a doctor (preferably a prestigious and highly paid specialist) by instead pursuing postgraduate studies in theoretical physics (but not before detours to get accepted by all the best law schools and travels to undertake challenging volunteer work abroad). In spite of his self-assessment that he isn't quite brilliant enough to do theoretical physics, he goes on to write a dissertation on quantum dots. But his restlessness doesn't abate. He suffers angst and anomie from feeling more oriented to the random quantum than to the orderly classical world. It's a crisis of meaning and of personal significance. He wants to stop thinking and start acting. So he finally makes his parents happy by going to medical school ... and (as written in the stars at his birth) on to a crisis of self-confrontation in his internship, a decidedly nonacademic environment where he immediately senses he doesn't fit in and feels overwhelmed by having to act without thinking.

He is a very good writer. He has a wonderful way of introducing simple concepts from physics as metaphoric bridges to help himself (and his readers) creatively reconceptualize a personal or medical problem so that he (we) can understand it and/or find solutions (sometimes the solution is just the understanding). There is no real end to a memoir--a self-reflective person will go on learning from experience and growing--but I doubt the core traits that make this hero of his own story (as we all are) turn inward, introspect, brood, and challenge himself again and again will let him rest for very long.
Zulkishicage
An interesting take on this MD's internship. You can only learn so much in a book and then you have to practice on patients. Sandeep survived and even went on to become a cardiologist. More practice and opportunities for learning.
Medicine is a process of deduction, and experience. The part that gets me is the inhumanity of internship, the long hours without sleep, the pecking order of the teaching staff; how is one supposed to learn to be empathetic in an atmosphere that is grueling, and fraught with the possibility of errors. This training is part of the "old boy's club" where the older physicians want to make the younger ones suffer like they did. This is no longer the dark ages, and I wouldn't want someone taking care of me who has a hard time thinking straight!
Zulkishicage
An interesting take on this MD's internship. You can only learn so much in a book and then you have to practice on patients. Sandeep survived and even went on to become a cardiologist. More practice and opportunities for learning.
Medicine is a process of deduction, and experience. The part that gets me is the inhumanity of internship, the long hours without sleep, the pecking order of the teaching staff; how is one supposed to learn to be empathetic in an atmosphere that is grueling, and fraught with the possibility of errors. This training is part of the "old boy's club" where the older physicians want to make the younger ones suffer like they did. This is no longer the dark ages, and I wouldn't want someone taking care of me who has a hard time thinking straight!
Sennnel
This is a book I would definitely recommend. I'm not sure if the accounts in this book are composites or how he gets around revealing the intimate details, but they are really captivating. And what makes the book more interesting (besides his good writing-- he was published in the New York Times, after all!), is his willingness to criticize himself and reveal his vulnerabilities. This book seems to really portray a true image of what it is like to become a doctor, from the point of view of the trenches.
Sennnel
This is a book I would definitely recommend. I'm not sure if the accounts in this book are composites or how he gets around revealing the intimate details, but they are really captivating. And what makes the book more interesting (besides his good writing-- he was published in the New York Times, after all!), is his willingness to criticize himself and reveal his vulnerabilities. This book seems to really portray a true image of what it is like to become a doctor, from the point of view of the trenches.
ZEr0
This book did me a ton of good as I was transitioning out of school and into my profession, I buy it for every new grad that I know so that they can get the same heads up. By addressing his shortcomings and feelings of inadequacy Dr Jauhar put his voice behind one of the toughest things for us type A medical professionals to come to terms with.
ZEr0
This book did me a ton of good as I was transitioning out of school and into my profession, I buy it for every new grad that I know so that they can get the same heads up. By addressing his shortcomings and feelings of inadequacy Dr Jauhar put his voice behind one of the toughest things for us type A medical professionals to come to terms with.
Dawncrusher
This book is a great depicition of the feelings in the mind of a fearful medical student. Acting with confidence in poise while riddled with doubt. What makes this book great is the authors descriptions of personal anxiety. Dr. Janhar was open and candid about his internal feelings. I was able to relate my own personal fears, doubts and anxiety to the author. This book shows the literal selfless sacrifice of those in the personal pursuit of medicine. As well as yourself it is also cited that others around you suffer your sacrifice as well. Dr. Janhar's book should be read by anyone who wants to go in the field of medicine. Overall great book, I look forward to another from him in the future.
Dawncrusher
This book is a great depicition of the feelings in the mind of a fearful medical student. Acting with confidence in poise while riddled with doubt. What makes this book great is the authors descriptions of personal anxiety. Dr. Janhar was open and candid about his internal feelings. I was able to relate my own personal fears, doubts and anxiety to the author. This book shows the literal selfless sacrifice of those in the personal pursuit of medicine. As well as yourself it is also cited that others around you suffer your sacrifice as well. Dr. Janhar's book should be read by anyone who wants to go in the field of medicine. Overall great book, I look forward to another from him in the future.
Nuadabandis
I have read several accounts of a doctor's key training and have been to lectures about it. This is a very sincere and truthful story of how hard it is for a new physician to care for patients in a big city and always do the right thing. I read it two years ago and still think about it when I hear about someone in a hospital emergency.
Nuadabandis
I have read several accounts of a doctor's key training and have been to lectures about it. This is a very sincere and truthful story of how hard it is for a new physician to care for patients in a big city and always do the right thing. I read it two years ago and still think about it when I hear about someone in a hospital emergency.
Kelenn
As a fourth year medical student beginning an Internal Med residency this summer, I cherished every page of this book...great literary skills and story telling technique...good to know I'm not alone in all the anxiety and excitement that comes along with internship...also very well written so that non-medicine people can read and understand the entire narration...had my mom read the book (which she did in 5 days) and now its with my girlfriend! Explained all the emotions we will/have experienced going forward better than I ever could!
Kelenn
As a fourth year medical student beginning an Internal Med residency this summer, I cherished every page of this book...great literary skills and story telling technique...good to know I'm not alone in all the anxiety and excitement that comes along with internship...also very well written so that non-medicine people can read and understand the entire narration...had my mom read the book (which she did in 5 days) and now its with my girlfriend! Explained all the emotions we will/have experienced going forward better than I ever could!
In this excellent book, Sandeep Jauhar, who trained as a physicist, but decided to become a doctor, shows us his experiences in medical school and his doubts that he could ever become a good doctor. He tells about some of the patients he saw and how he sometimes felt that he couldn't spend enough time with them. He believes that some changes could be made to the practice of medicine, including putting more emphasis on training family practitioners. Specialists make more money, but for patients, the system can be fragmented and duplicative, when seeing many different doctors. This book has descriptions of hospital situations as well as Dr. Jauhar's feelings and opinions on what goes on in the medical field-very engrossing.
In this excellent book, Sandeep Jauhar, who trained as a physicist, but decided to become a doctor, shows us his experiences in medical school and his doubts that he could ever become a good doctor. He tells about some of the patients he saw and how he sometimes felt that he couldn't spend enough time with them. He believes that some changes could be made to the practice of medicine, including putting more emphasis on training family practitioners. Specialists make more money, but for patients, the system can be fragmented and duplicative, when seeing many different doctors. This book has descriptions of hospital situations as well as Dr. Jauhar's feelings and opinions on what goes on in the medical field-very engrossing.