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Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in the Wilderness epub download

by Pete Fromm


So begins Pete Fromm's seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness guarding salmon eggs. After blundering into this forbidding errand as a college lark, Fromm gradually come face to face with the blunt realities of life as a contemporary mountain man.

So begins Pete Fromm's seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness guarding salmon eggs. Brutal cold, isolation, and fearful risks balance against the satisfaction of living a unique existence in modern America. This award-winning narrative is a gripping story of adventure, a rousing tale of self-sufficiency, and modern-day Walden

So begins Pete Fromm's seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness guarding salmon eggs. This award-winning narrative is a gripping story of adventure, a rousing tale of self-sufficiency, and modern-day Walden

com User, November 11, 2018. I have always wanted to live in the wilderness, although not in a tent. This book gave me an example of what it would be like.

com User, November 11, 2018. I did not know what to expect with this book. I recently discovered that st books are interesting. This book did not disappoint me at all. I was unable to put it down. com User, January 23, 2007. I truly loved this book on many levels, from the hunting and fishing experiences the author.

Indian Creek Chronicles:. has been added to your Cart. I particularly appreciated the way Pete explained its relation to the wilderness. Normally I like a lot of dialogue in a novel but this one didn't have much since the majority of time it was just Fromm, alone. However, Fromm's internal dialogue was fantastic; the way he discovered himself by being completely isolated was inspiring and very well written.

Indian Creek Chronicles book. My only knocks on this book is the writing is of average quality and Fromm's ego, at times, can be annoying. Fortunately, neither detracts greatly from the story.

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Indian Creek Chronicles. A Winter Alone in the Wilderness. Pete Fromm; With a New Afterword by the Author. Pete Fromm is an honest, objective, and impeccably focused observer of the natural world, and a superb writer to boot

Indian Creek Chronicles. Pete Fromm is an honest, objective, and impeccably focused observer of the natural world, and a superb writer to boot. His sentences have the impact of an ax cleaving chunks of frozen stovewood, and Indian Creek Chronicles is as satisfying as ten cords freshly split and stacked and ready for winter. Jerry Dennis, author of A Place on the Water. A swift, absorbing tale. has made me shake out my heavy winter sleeping bags with renewed enthusiasm.

Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter in the Wilderness, 1993 (Indian Creek, 2006). Short Story collections. The Tall Uncut (1992). Fromm has been awarded the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award five times: in 1994 for the memoir Indian Creek Chronicles; in 1998 for the story collection Dry Rain; in 2001 for the novel, How All This Started: in 2004 for the novel As Cool As I Am, and in 2015 for the novel If Not For This. Interview with Pete Fromm on Pacific Northwest Booksellers.

Электронная книга "Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter in the Bitterroot Wilderness", Pete Fromm. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter in the Bitterroot Wilderness" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

"The wardens climbed into their truck, ready to leave. 'You'll need about seven cords of firewood. Concentrate on that. You'll have to get it all in before the snow grounds your truck.'""Though I didn't want to ask, it seemed important. 'What's a cord?'"So begins Pete Fromm's seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness guarding salmon eggs. After blundering into this forbidding errand as a college lark, Fromm gradually come face to face with the blunt realities of life as a contemporary mountain man. Brutal cold, isolation, and fearful risks balance against the satisfaction of living a unique existence in modern America.This award-winning narrative is a gripping story of adventure, a rousing tale of self-sufficiency, and modern-day Walden. From either perspective, Fromm lives up to his reputation as one of the West's strongest new voices.

Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in the Wilderness epub download

ISBN13: 978-0312114145

ISBN: 0312114141

Author: Pete Fromm

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Historical

Language: English

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First Edition edition (August 15, 1994)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB size: 1281 kb

FB2 size: 1425 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 692

Other Formats: lrf mbr mbr mobi

Related to Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in the Wilderness ePub books

Grokinos
I am a nature lover and just needed a book to take me where I can't go right now. But, a word of caution, if you are like me and are squeamish or just not "into" hunting. The book is at least 50% about killing animals, skinning them, and eating them. It didn't stop me from reading it, and it's still an amazing story, but thought I'd give a little warning for vegetarians or non-hunters.
Grokinos
I am a nature lover and just needed a book to take me where I can't go right now. But, a word of caution, if you are like me and are squeamish or just not "into" hunting. The book is at least 50% about killing animals, skinning them, and eating them. It didn't stop me from reading it, and it's still an amazing story, but thought I'd give a little warning for vegetarians or non-hunters.
Risa
As a recent transplant to Idaho working with natural resource mgt, hunters, and fisheries, I often feel exactly like how Pete Fromm describes himself toward the beginning of this book - out of place, somewhat clueless, not really sure what I've gotten myself into, and pretty sure everyone more "seasoned" is silently judging me for my appearance and all the things I clearly don't know.

It was great to see his transformation as he learns and grows over his winter in the wilderness, and to read echoes of my own experiences finding direction in life and appreciating the outdoors. Since winter is already over as I write this, I look forward to becoming another of the fair-weather summer tourists gawking at his old tent site and just not really getting it.

This is a quick, entertaining read for people who yearn for ... something ... though they're not quite sure what, and find it in the woods.
It is "My Side of the Mountain" grown up and gone off to college. It's "Into The Wild" in an alternate universe where the hapless young protagonist survives and the moose doesn't rot. It's reflective and personal and genuine.
Excellent book. Cheers, sir <swigs mountain-manfully>!
Risa
As a recent transplant to Idaho working with natural resource mgt, hunters, and fisheries, I often feel exactly like how Pete Fromm describes himself toward the beginning of this book - out of place, somewhat clueless, not really sure what I've gotten myself into, and pretty sure everyone more "seasoned" is silently judging me for my appearance and all the things I clearly don't know.

It was great to see his transformation as he learns and grows over his winter in the wilderness, and to read echoes of my own experiences finding direction in life and appreciating the outdoors. Since winter is already over as I write this, I look forward to becoming another of the fair-weather summer tourists gawking at his old tent site and just not really getting it.

This is a quick, entertaining read for people who yearn for ... something ... though they're not quite sure what, and find it in the woods.
It is "My Side of the Mountain" grown up and gone off to college. It's "Into The Wild" in an alternate universe where the hapless young protagonist survives and the moose doesn't rot. It's reflective and personal and genuine.
Excellent book. Cheers, sir <swigs mountain-manfully>!
Faell
Good story of a man in the wilderness and how circumstances work in his favor. Despite some critical errors, Fromm is able to spend the entire winter season in the wilderness. He learns from his mistakes and begins to become proficient.
Some difficult passages though. The hunting of a cougar is described in such a disturbing way that it is as far from "sport" as possible. Shooting a cornered wild animal from point blank range is cowardly and amateurish. Also, as a dog lover, I am not sure how he could just give his dog away as if it were a disposable lighter.....someone else needs it....here, you can have it.
Fromm does capture the beauty of the wilderness well.
Faell
Good story of a man in the wilderness and how circumstances work in his favor. Despite some critical errors, Fromm is able to spend the entire winter season in the wilderness. He learns from his mistakes and begins to become proficient.
Some difficult passages though. The hunting of a cougar is described in such a disturbing way that it is as far from "sport" as possible. Shooting a cornered wild animal from point blank range is cowardly and amateurish. Also, as a dog lover, I am not sure how he could just give his dog away as if it were a disposable lighter.....someone else needs it....here, you can have it.
Fromm does capture the beauty of the wilderness well.
dermeco
This is a book review, not a summary, so I'm not going to outline the entire novel here.
What can I say; I love this book! This novel, along with Edward Abbey's 'Desert Solitaire,' motivated me to switch from slactivist to activist. I was in my early 20s, living in Idaho, when I first read this book so the story felt very real to me. Peter Fromm's first person account of how he stumbled into spending a winter in the mountains, with no real backcountry or outdoor experience whatsoever, was extremely engaging. Normally I like a lot of dialogue in a novel but this one didn't have much since the majority of time it was just Fromm, alone. However, Fromm's internal dialogue was fantastic; the way he discovered himself by being completely isolated was inspiring and very well written. Lots of adventure and humor, with a little bit of misery thrown in for balance. Whenever people ask me to recommend a book, this one is always in my Top 5 (the others being Shantaram, by Gregory David Roberts; Desert Solitaire, by Edward Abbey; The Stand, by Stephen King; and The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, by Haruki Murakami).
dermeco
This is a book review, not a summary, so I'm not going to outline the entire novel here.
What can I say; I love this book! This novel, along with Edward Abbey's 'Desert Solitaire,' motivated me to switch from slactivist to activist. I was in my early 20s, living in Idaho, when I first read this book so the story felt very real to me. Peter Fromm's first person account of how he stumbled into spending a winter in the mountains, with no real backcountry or outdoor experience whatsoever, was extremely engaging. Normally I like a lot of dialogue in a novel but this one didn't have much since the majority of time it was just Fromm, alone. However, Fromm's internal dialogue was fantastic; the way he discovered himself by being completely isolated was inspiring and very well written. Lots of adventure and humor, with a little bit of misery thrown in for balance. Whenever people ask me to recommend a book, this one is always in my Top 5 (the others being Shantaram, by Gregory David Roberts; Desert Solitaire, by Edward Abbey; The Stand, by Stephen King; and The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, by Haruki Murakami).
Unnis
Some friends of mine are certainly going to get "Indian Creek Chronicles" for Christmas this year. A wide variety of interests will enjoy this book.

Pete Fromm is justly known as an excellent writer. This memoir is some of his early material and describes some of his earliest wilderness experiences. He was a tenderfoot in an alien environment. Thus this becomes a true story written on a clean slate. A person must believe that the experience had a profound influence on him and on his writings that we enjoy as they reach publication today.

Fromm makes it sound as if it were almost an accident that he ended up deep in Idaho's Selway wilderness while he was still a teen. However, it is never truly an accident that a person strikes out on an adventure. When the adventure works out well, it is usually because the circumstances match a certain makeup in the person's being. Fromm was searching his way through a program at the University of Montana when an opportunity appeared to spend the winter far from civilization watching over a bunch of salmon eggs too small to see. Without really thinking about what it meant to spend months without human contact or access to help if he needed it, he postpones his education and accepts the job. That the job required only a few minutes each day added to the loneliness but provided time to learn from the wilderness.

He lands in a wall tent without much instruction on what supplies he should have brought or how he should survive the challenges he might face. The winter weather in that part of the country is renowned for deep snow, severe temperatures, and long duration. Fortuitously, he brought a young dog that proves to be a good companion and a focus during times of loneliness. He also brought a pioneering spirit without which the adventure would have been a disaster.

The book relates a self-taught crash course in survival skills, learning about one's self, and discovering the ways of nature in the wilderness. There was something unexpected around every corner, and the corners were close together.

One expects the unexpected in such a situation. The phone hanging on a nearby tree doesn't work - this is before wireless - adding to the isolation, and also the risk. On the other hand, snowmobiles unexpectedly appear occasionally with outfitters, hunters, or forest rangers. An attempt by Fromm's brother and father to ski in on a visit ends unsuccessfully, and Fromm's concern over the possible consequences causes him to put himself at risk.

There is some superlative nature writing here, such as the emotions aroused by an eclipse of the sun. Human interaction with the changing seasons and the animals of the wilderness receive a fresh look through the eyes of someone just learning about such things. There is an "Afterword" chapter that brought tears to my voice as I was reading the book aloud.

Regardless of whether your interest turns to the outdoors or to the enjoyment of human nature, you will enjoy this book. It is the kind of book you will refer to frequently in conversations with your friends.
Unnis
Some friends of mine are certainly going to get "Indian Creek Chronicles" for Christmas this year. A wide variety of interests will enjoy this book.

Pete Fromm is justly known as an excellent writer. This memoir is some of his early material and describes some of his earliest wilderness experiences. He was a tenderfoot in an alien environment. Thus this becomes a true story written on a clean slate. A person must believe that the experience had a profound influence on him and on his writings that we enjoy as they reach publication today.

Fromm makes it sound as if it were almost an accident that he ended up deep in Idaho's Selway wilderness while he was still a teen. However, it is never truly an accident that a person strikes out on an adventure. When the adventure works out well, it is usually because the circumstances match a certain makeup in the person's being. Fromm was searching his way through a program at the University of Montana when an opportunity appeared to spend the winter far from civilization watching over a bunch of salmon eggs too small to see. Without really thinking about what it meant to spend months without human contact or access to help if he needed it, he postpones his education and accepts the job. That the job required only a few minutes each day added to the loneliness but provided time to learn from the wilderness.

He lands in a wall tent without much instruction on what supplies he should have brought or how he should survive the challenges he might face. The winter weather in that part of the country is renowned for deep snow, severe temperatures, and long duration. Fortuitously, he brought a young dog that proves to be a good companion and a focus during times of loneliness. He also brought a pioneering spirit without which the adventure would have been a disaster.

The book relates a self-taught crash course in survival skills, learning about one's self, and discovering the ways of nature in the wilderness. There was something unexpected around every corner, and the corners were close together.

One expects the unexpected in such a situation. The phone hanging on a nearby tree doesn't work - this is before wireless - adding to the isolation, and also the risk. On the other hand, snowmobiles unexpectedly appear occasionally with outfitters, hunters, or forest rangers. An attempt by Fromm's brother and father to ski in on a visit ends unsuccessfully, and Fromm's concern over the possible consequences causes him to put himself at risk.

There is some superlative nature writing here, such as the emotions aroused by an eclipse of the sun. Human interaction with the changing seasons and the animals of the wilderness receive a fresh look through the eyes of someone just learning about such things. There is an "Afterword" chapter that brought tears to my voice as I was reading the book aloud.

Regardless of whether your interest turns to the outdoors or to the enjoyment of human nature, you will enjoy this book. It is the kind of book you will refer to frequently in conversations with your friends.
Darkraven
A very engaging read that takes you from home to the snowy Montana. You live Pete's adventure with him and see his transformation from a young student to an (almost ;-) rugged mountaineer. I particularly appreciated the way Pete explained its relation to the wilderness. At the end of the book, I was outraged with him at the way 'outsiders' behaved with it's beloved environment.
Darkraven
A very engaging read that takes you from home to the snowy Montana. You live Pete's adventure with him and see his transformation from a young student to an (almost ;-) rugged mountaineer. I particularly appreciated the way Pete explained its relation to the wilderness. At the end of the book, I was outraged with him at the way 'outsiders' behaved with it's beloved environment.