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Constantine and the Christian Empire (Roman Imperial Biographies) epub download

by Charles Odahl


Charles Matson Odahl long served as the Professor of Ancient and Medieval History and Latin Literature at Boise .

Charles Matson Odahl long served as the Professor of Ancient and Medieval History and Latin Literature at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho (1975-2011) and now serves as Visiting Professor for Roman and Byzantine History at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.

Extensively illustrated and fully documented, Constantine and the Christian Empire has been a landmark publication in Roman imperial, early Christian, and Byzantine history. A genealogy chart, additional illustrations,.

In the end only three things matter: how much you loved, how gently you lived, and how gracefully you let go of things not meant for you. ― Anonymous. How To Stop Worrying And Start Living. 01 MB·117,830 Downloads. the captain standing on the bridge, could press a button and-presto! to live with 'day-tight compartments' as the most.

During the reign of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (AD 306–337), Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire.

During the reign of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (AD 306–337), Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire

A landmark publication in Roman Imperial, early Christian, and Byzantine history, Constantine and the Christian .

Roman Imperial Biographies. Byzantinische Zeitschrift 99 (1):260-261 (2006). Similar books and articles. Constantine and the Christian Empire. Education in the Christian Roman Empire: Christian and Pagan Theories Under Constantine and His Successors. Das vorliegende Buch ist bereits der dreizehnte Band der Reihe Roman Imperial Biographies. Glanville Downey - 1957 - Speculum 32 (1):48-61. Imperial Rome (. De Blois, (. Funke, (. Hahn (Ed. The Impact of Imperial Rome on Religions, Ritual and Religious Life in the Roman Empire.

Combining vivid narrative and historical analysis, Charles Odahl relates the rise of. .Books related to Constantine and the Christian Empire.

Combining vivid narrative and historical analysis, Charles Odahl relates the rise of Constantine amid the crises of the late Roman world, his dramatic conversion to and public patronage of Christianity, and his church building programs in Rome, Jerusalem and Constantinople which transformed the pagan state of Roman antiquity into the Christian empire medieval Byzantium.

p. c. (Roman imperial biographies) Includes bibliographical references and index

p. (Roman imperial biographies) Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Constantine I, Emperor of Rome, d. 337. 2. phy. 3. tine I, the Great, 306–337. 4. Church history-Primitive and early church, ca.

The most substantial biography ever written on the most important Roman emperor, Professor Charles M. Odahl has written a fascinating account of the life and reign of the first Christian emperor of the Roman world.

Drawing on over a quarter of a century of research on sources relevant to the period and retracing the journeys made by Constantine across Europe and around the Mediterranean basin, this up-to-date biography provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of literary sources and research into the archaeology of the Constantinian era, and enables a more rounded and accurate portrait than has previously been available.

Illustrated with ninety-two photographs and eight maps, Constantine and the Christian Empire is the standard work on the man and his life for scholars, students, and all those interested in Roman imperial, early Christian, and Byzantine imperial history.

Constantine and the Christian Empire (Roman Imperial Biographies) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0415174855

ISBN: 0415174856

Author: Charles Odahl

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Historical

Language: English

Publisher: Routledge (September 24, 2004)

Pages: 424 pages

ePUB size: 1823 kb

FB2 size: 1508 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 342

Other Formats: lrf doc mbr lrf

Related to Constantine and the Christian Empire (Roman Imperial Biographies) ePub books

Kaim
This is an excellent biography of emperor Constantine. The book is well written and easy to read, but it is still a rigorous scholar work, with complete references to both ancient works and modern studies. Thus, it is well suited for the armchair historian but also for a serious student of the late roman empire. You will find all available details on Constantine background, his family and his activities both in the religious and civil field.
Constantine's life has been interpreted in different ways: most old historians (from Gibbon onwards) tended to have a more negative view of this emperor, while most contemporary historians have a generally positive judgment - basically this depends mostly on the relative value given to Eusebius' biography on Constantine (the major contemporary source on Constantine's reign). Eusebius was a christian bishop and theologian and a survivor of the Great Persecution, so it is no surprise that his view of Constantine was clearly biased (and largely discarded by old historians). However, Eusebius' work includes many original documents (plus he was the only historian who talked directly with Constantine himself!) thus a careful interpretation of his work and is the key of most modern works on Constantine (in particular after Barnes major work on Constantine and Eusebius). Odahl gives a balanced account of Constatine's reign. He critically interprets Eusebius work, in particular regarding Constantine's conversion and its religious opinions. Previous authors have described Constantine as a simple and unrefined soldier-emperor. Odahl clearly shows the evolution of Constantine thoughts and of his understanding of christian theology that reached considerable depth. This analysis is based on surviving letters and speeches made by Constantine himself (and reported in part in the book). The dark side of his reign (in particular the executions of close family members) are also clearly presented and discussed, although it is impossible to really understand what happened due to the lack of contemporary evidences. Thus, Odahl presents what reported by ancient historian after Constantine's death, without making hypothesis which could never be substantiated. The simple truth is that we will never know the reasons for Constantine's great tragedy (the execution of his son Crispus and his wife Fausta): what we know is that he did not want to share these reasons with the public (Eusebius never wrote a word about these events not even to justify the emperor).
The book includes a good discussion of numismatic evidences as well as of the many buildings made by the emperor (an often overlooked topic: the many churhes, basilicas and other buildings made throughout the empire show without any doubt the strong and early commitment of Constantine to the Christian faith).
Although the title of the book is "Constantine and the Christian Empire" the second part of the title is less well presented in the book. I would have liked a more thorough and technical discussion of administrative and military reforms of Diocletian and Constantine.
Still this is probably the best single book on Contantine's life. Eusebius and Contantine by Barnes is an excellent reference book, but it is not a biography of Constantine (it includes several chapters on Eusebius life and works, which are not so interesting for readers who hare not deeply involved in the history of the Church). If you want something more simple and less scholarly-shaped (but still accurate) you may look for Michael Grant biography.
Kaim
This is an excellent biography of emperor Constantine. The book is well written and easy to read, but it is still a rigorous scholar work, with complete references to both ancient works and modern studies. Thus, it is well suited for the armchair historian but also for a serious student of the late roman empire. You will find all available details on Constantine background, his family and his activities both in the religious and civil field.
Constantine's life has been interpreted in different ways: most old historians (from Gibbon onwards) tended to have a more negative view of this emperor, while most contemporary historians have a generally positive judgment - basically this depends mostly on the relative value given to Eusebius' biography on Constantine (the major contemporary source on Constantine's reign). Eusebius was a christian bishop and theologian and a survivor of the Great Persecution, so it is no surprise that his view of Constantine was clearly biased (and largely discarded by old historians). However, Eusebius' work includes many original documents (plus he was the only historian who talked directly with Constantine himself!) thus a careful interpretation of his work and is the key of most modern works on Constantine (in particular after Barnes major work on Constantine and Eusebius). Odahl gives a balanced account of Constatine's reign. He critically interprets Eusebius work, in particular regarding Constantine's conversion and its religious opinions. Previous authors have described Constantine as a simple and unrefined soldier-emperor. Odahl clearly shows the evolution of Constantine thoughts and of his understanding of christian theology that reached considerable depth. This analysis is based on surviving letters and speeches made by Constantine himself (and reported in part in the book). The dark side of his reign (in particular the executions of close family members) are also clearly presented and discussed, although it is impossible to really understand what happened due to the lack of contemporary evidences. Thus, Odahl presents what reported by ancient historian after Constantine's death, without making hypothesis which could never be substantiated. The simple truth is that we will never know the reasons for Constantine's great tragedy (the execution of his son Crispus and his wife Fausta): what we know is that he did not want to share these reasons with the public (Eusebius never wrote a word about these events not even to justify the emperor).
The book includes a good discussion of numismatic evidences as well as of the many buildings made by the emperor (an often overlooked topic: the many churhes, basilicas and other buildings made throughout the empire show without any doubt the strong and early commitment of Constantine to the Christian faith).
Although the title of the book is "Constantine and the Christian Empire" the second part of the title is less well presented in the book. I would have liked a more thorough and technical discussion of administrative and military reforms of Diocletian and Constantine.
Still this is probably the best single book on Contantine's life. Eusebius and Contantine by Barnes is an excellent reference book, but it is not a biography of Constantine (it includes several chapters on Eusebius life and works, which are not so interesting for readers who hare not deeply involved in the history of the Church). If you want something more simple and less scholarly-shaped (but still accurate) you may look for Michael Grant biography.
GWEZJ
This scholarly work is extensively informative. Would that more people knew about Constantine, who was a remarkable person. His mother also was quite a person.
GWEZJ
This scholarly work is extensively informative. Would that more people knew about Constantine, who was a remarkable person. His mother also was quite a person.
Nikohn
Constantine (the Roman Emperor who converted to, legalized, and promoted Christianity) is probably one of the most controversial people in church history. In my experience he is usually portrayed in one of three ways:

Version #1 - Bordering-on-Messianic Constantine - The righteous man who was God's chosen instrument to deliver, enrich, and empower His church. (i.e. the Roman Catholic / Eastern Orthodox version)

Version #2 - Conspiracy Theory Constantine - The savvy politician who hijacked Christianity, overseeing the deification of Jesus and compilation of the New Testament to suit his own (or possibly others') Machiavellian ends. (i.e. the Bart Ehrman / Dan Brown version)

Version #3 - Devil's Pawn Constantine - The pagan whose "conversion" unwittingly introduced into the Roman Catholic Church all the doctrinal errors and practices to which Protestants object (i.e. the Protestant / Dissenter version)

Thankfully, the author of this book does not have an obvious "Constantine is saintly/devious/evil" ax to grind. He gives a thorough account of Constantine's life and historical setting, relying on a large number of primary sources. The portrait that emerges bears a passing resemblance to each of the above versions, but shows them all to be extreme caricatures.

Constantine most certainly relieved Christians from persecution and actively promoted and enriched the Catholic Church while using his government power to inconvenience and/or punishing those outside it (whether pagans or "schismatic" Christians). His grasp of Christianity seemed very talismanic and syncretistic at first, giving rise to legitimate questions about his initial conversion. In his later years he appeared to have a decent grasp of the doctrines of the Catholic Church (which already espoused many of the doctrines to which Protestants object). He did use his position to summon councils that clarified/formalized a variety of beliefs, but they they were long-standing beliefs already held by the majority of Christians.

Whether all of this was good or not is, I suppose, a matter of debate (which the author of this book does not get into). As a pastor in a "Dissenter" denomination, I see Constantine's use of government authority to enforce doctrinal unity even against the dictates of conscience as setting a dark precedent that would persist in the Roman Catholic Church and the Magisterial wing of the Protestant Reformation for centuries. That said, to reduce this important man to saint or devil is a ridiculous oversimplification, and I greatly appreciate this author's work in giving a more balanced portrait of Constantine.
Nikohn
Constantine (the Roman Emperor who converted to, legalized, and promoted Christianity) is probably one of the most controversial people in church history. In my experience he is usually portrayed in one of three ways:

Version #1 - Bordering-on-Messianic Constantine - The righteous man who was God's chosen instrument to deliver, enrich, and empower His church. (i.e. the Roman Catholic / Eastern Orthodox version)

Version #2 - Conspiracy Theory Constantine - The savvy politician who hijacked Christianity, overseeing the deification of Jesus and compilation of the New Testament to suit his own (or possibly others') Machiavellian ends. (i.e. the Bart Ehrman / Dan Brown version)

Version #3 - Devil's Pawn Constantine - The pagan whose "conversion" unwittingly introduced into the Roman Catholic Church all the doctrinal errors and practices to which Protestants object (i.e. the Protestant / Dissenter version)

Thankfully, the author of this book does not have an obvious "Constantine is saintly/devious/evil" ax to grind. He gives a thorough account of Constantine's life and historical setting, relying on a large number of primary sources. The portrait that emerges bears a passing resemblance to each of the above versions, but shows them all to be extreme caricatures.

Constantine most certainly relieved Christians from persecution and actively promoted and enriched the Catholic Church while using his government power to inconvenience and/or punishing those outside it (whether pagans or "schismatic" Christians). His grasp of Christianity seemed very talismanic and syncretistic at first, giving rise to legitimate questions about his initial conversion. In his later years he appeared to have a decent grasp of the doctrines of the Catholic Church (which already espoused many of the doctrines to which Protestants object). He did use his position to summon councils that clarified/formalized a variety of beliefs, but they they were long-standing beliefs already held by the majority of Christians.

Whether all of this was good or not is, I suppose, a matter of debate (which the author of this book does not get into). As a pastor in a "Dissenter" denomination, I see Constantine's use of government authority to enforce doctrinal unity even against the dictates of conscience as setting a dark precedent that would persist in the Roman Catholic Church and the Magisterial wing of the Protestant Reformation for centuries. That said, to reduce this important man to saint or devil is a ridiculous oversimplification, and I greatly appreciate this author's work in giving a more balanced portrait of Constantine.
Rleillin
A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'First published in 2004, in this new edition, Prof. Odahl (Oregon State) gives us a revised although by no means hagiographic look at the man’s life, though Odahl doesn’t depict him as the hypocritical religious tyrant found in some other accounts. Odahl sets the man within his times, warts and merits alike. The account of the Constantine’s family background includes a short life of his parents, Constantius and Helena. We follow Constantine’s rise in the brutal politics of the “tetrarchy” of the early fourth century, his struggles with competing emperors that left him sole ruler, his continuation of the Diocletianic reforms and institution of new ones, and, of course, his conversion to Christianity, a matter sometimes treated as opportunistic, but in Odahl’s view perhaps more real than generally believed. We also get a look at Constantine’s building program, including many edifices that still survive, a well done account of Helena’ pilgrimage to the Holy Land and her discovery of relics of Jesus, the disastrous family crisis that saw Constantine put to death his eldest son, and more. That more includes Constantine’s religious policy, his efforts to get rival Christian sects to agree on basic principles which resulted in the Nicene Creed and gave us the canonical Bible, all accomplished with considerably less controversy than is usually depicted. Altogether this is a very good account of one of the greatest of the Roman Emperors.'

For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com
Rleillin
A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'First published in 2004, in this new edition, Prof. Odahl (Oregon State) gives us a revised although by no means hagiographic look at the man’s life, though Odahl doesn’t depict him as the hypocritical religious tyrant found in some other accounts. Odahl sets the man within his times, warts and merits alike. The account of the Constantine’s family background includes a short life of his parents, Constantius and Helena. We follow Constantine’s rise in the brutal politics of the “tetrarchy” of the early fourth century, his struggles with competing emperors that left him sole ruler, his continuation of the Diocletianic reforms and institution of new ones, and, of course, his conversion to Christianity, a matter sometimes treated as opportunistic, but in Odahl’s view perhaps more real than generally believed. We also get a look at Constantine’s building program, including many edifices that still survive, a well done account of Helena’ pilgrimage to the Holy Land and her discovery of relics of Jesus, the disastrous family crisis that saw Constantine put to death his eldest son, and more. That more includes Constantine’s religious policy, his efforts to get rival Christian sects to agree on basic principles which resulted in the Nicene Creed and gave us the canonical Bible, all accomplished with considerably less controversy than is usually depicted. Altogether this is a very good account of one of the greatest of the Roman Emperors.'

For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com