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In Heaven Everything is Fine: The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre epub download

by Charlie Buckholtz,Josh Frank


Surrounded by crazies, Peter Ivers faced the growing pains of a musical and social upheaval with a smile and aplomb. In Heaven Everything Is Fine is a transparent view into that world. Josh Frank’s interviews remind us of how many people we change a little while we are here.

Surrounded by crazies, Peter Ivers faced the growing pains of a musical and social upheaval with a smile and aplomb. Spit Stix, former drummer for Fear. Overdue and highly recommended, this work assays a crucial era of popular culture history.

On March 3, 1983, Peter Ivers was found murdered in his loft on skid row in . He is probably best remembered as host of New Wave Theatre, a 1980s TV venture that progressed from an . based UHF channel to the USA cable network.

New Wave Theatre brought together for the first time lywood players like John Belushi, Chevy . Upon his death, Ivers was just beginning to get mainstream recognition.

New Wave Theatre brought together for the first time lywood players like John Belushi, Chevy Chase, and Harold Ramis with West Coast punk rockers Black Flag, the Dead Kennedys, Fear, and others, thus transforming music and comedy forever. The show was a jubilant, chaotic medy cabaret, and Ivers was its charismatic leader and muse. In Heaven Everything Is Fine is the first book to explore both the fertile, gritty scene that began and ended with New Wave Theatre and the life and death of its guiding spirit.

On March 3, 1983, Peter Ivers was found bludgeoned to death in his loft in downtown Los .

On March 3, 1983, Peter Ivers was found bludgeoned to death in his loft in downtown Los Angeles, ending a short-lived but essential pop cultural moment that has been all but lost to history. New Wave Theatre brought together for the first time lywood players like John Belushi, Chevy Chase, and Harold Ramis with West Coast punk rockers Black Flag, the Dead Kennedys, Fear, and others, thus transforming music and comedy forever.

Josh Frank and Charlie Buckholtz wrote a book about Ivers' life, art and mysterious death, In Heaven Everything Is Fine: The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre, published by Simon & Schuster in 2008.

Josh Frank and Charlie Buckholtz wrote a book about Ivers' life, art and mysterious death, In Heaven Everything Is Fine: The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre, published by Simon & Schuster in 2008

New Wave Theatre brought together for the first time lywood players like John .

The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre. With Charlie Buckholtz. On March 3, 1983, Peter Ivers was found bludgeoned to death in his loft in downtown Los Angeles, ending a short-lived but essential pop cultural moment that has been all but lost to history. For the two years leading up to his murder, Ivers had hosted the underground but increasingly popular LA-based music and sketch-comedy cable show New Wave Theatre.

Josh Frank (author), Charlie Buckholtz (with). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Paperback 352 Pages, Published: 31/12/2009. Publisher out of stock.

16 pages of b&w photographs. In Heaven Everything Is Fine.

Walmart 9781593762704. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. In Heaven Everything Is Fine : The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre. 16 pages of b&w photographs.

On March 3, 1983, Peter Ivers was found bludgeoned to death in his loft in downtown Los Angeles, ending a short-lived but essential pop cultural moment that has been all but lost to history. For the two years leading up to his murder, Ivers had hosted the underground but increasingly popular LA-based music and sketch-comedy cable show New Wave Theatre. The late '70s through early '80s was an explosive time for pop culture: Saturday Night Live and National Lampoon were leading a comedy renaissance, while punk rock and new wave were turning the music world on its head. New Wave Theatre brought together for the first time comedians-turned-Hollywood players like John Belushi, Chevy Chase, and Harold Ramis with West Coast punk rockers Black Flag, the Dead Kennedys, Fear, and others, thus transforming music and comedy forever. The show was a jubilant, chaotic punk-experimental-comedy cabaret, and Ivers was its charismatic leader and muse. He was, in fact, the only person with the vision, the generosity of spirit, and the myriad of talented friends to bring together these two very different but equally influential worlds, and with his death the improbable and electric union of punk and comedy came to an end. The magnetic, impishly brilliant Ivers was a respected musician and composer (in addition to several albums, he wrote the music for the centerpiece song of David Lynch's cult classic Eraserhead) whose sublime and bizarre creativity was evident in everything he did. He was surrounded by people who loved him, many of them luminaries: his best friend from his Harvard days was Doug Kenney, founder of National Lampoon; he was also close to Harold Ramis and John Belushi. Upon his death, Ivers was just beginning to get mainstream recognition. In Heaven Everything Is Fine is the first book to explore both the fertile, gritty scene that began and ended with New Wave Theatre and the life and death of its guiding spirit. Josh Frank, author of Fool the World: The Oral History of a Band Called Pixies, interviewed hundreds of people from Ivers's circle, including Jello Biafra, Stockard Channing, and David Lynch, and we hear in their own words about Ivers and the marvelous world he inhabited. He also spoke with the Los Angeles Police Department about Ivers's still-unsolved murder, and, as a result of his research, the Cold Case Unit has reopened the investigation. In Heaven Everything Is Fine is a riveting account of a gifted artist, his tragic death, and a little-known yet crucial chapter in American pop history.

In Heaven Everything is Fine: The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre epub download

ISBN13: 978-1416551201

ISBN: 1416551204

Author: Charlie Buckholtz,Josh Frank

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Arts & Literature

Language: English

Publisher: Free Press; First Edition, First Printing edition (August 12, 2008)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB size: 1479 kb

FB2 size: 1640 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 302

Other Formats: docx lrf doc mbr

Related to In Heaven Everything is Fine: The Unsolved Life of Peter Ivers and the Lost History of New Wave Theatre ePub books

net rider
"In Heaven..." is a fascinating read as an in-depth biography of Peter Ivers, but it also makes for compelling murder mystery. Plus you get a unique look at those whose paths he crossed, including the National Lampoon founders, the early LA punk scene, David Lynch, Devo, and a seemingly endless and unrelated group of people from several different artistic communities and eras.

The book alternates between the story of Peter's life and career and the murder investigation, until the two stories sadly become one. Throughout the book you really get a sense of Peter's unbridled enthusiasm for life and his inspiring passion for all things creative. By the end of the book you'll understand why Peter touched so many people's lives so deeply.

Even if you only know him for his records, as the host of New Wave Theater, or as the guy that wrote the song from Eraserhead, the story is captivating enough for anyone with an interest in the arts to make this book reading.
net rider
"In Heaven..." is a fascinating read as an in-depth biography of Peter Ivers, but it also makes for compelling murder mystery. Plus you get a unique look at those whose paths he crossed, including the National Lampoon founders, the early LA punk scene, David Lynch, Devo, and a seemingly endless and unrelated group of people from several different artistic communities and eras.

The book alternates between the story of Peter's life and career and the murder investigation, until the two stories sadly become one. Throughout the book you really get a sense of Peter's unbridled enthusiasm for life and his inspiring passion for all things creative. By the end of the book you'll understand why Peter touched so many people's lives so deeply.

Even if you only know him for his records, as the host of New Wave Theater, or as the guy that wrote the song from Eraserhead, the story is captivating enough for anyone with an interest in the arts to make this book reading.
Chuynopana
yeah!
Chuynopana
yeah!
Hǻrley Quinn
I'm sorry to say... but this was a frustrating book to read. First of all, there seemed to be technical glitches with the Kindle Edition. (NOTE to Amazon) In the "cast of characters" section, for example, the names were printed as if the left-hand side of the pages were cut off for some reason. Then, as I finished the book, there was a whole list of photo credits, but NO PHOTOS! WTF? Books like this are always better if you can see the photos of the people you're reading about. Finally, the author refers you to a website for "book-extras", i.e. songs, reviews, etc. But when I found the website, most of the songs would not play! WTF?

Needless to say, the book would have been better w/o those distractions. I was never a Peter Ivers fan (didn't really know who he was) but he led an undoubtedly interesting life. I was fascinated, for instance, to learn that he was the writer/performer of the signature song in the movie "Eraserhead." I'm reminded me of a line in Bladerunner where Tyrell tells Roy Batty, "The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long - and you have burned so very, very brightly, Roy." Ivers seemed to burn-out before his time -- just as his career seemed to be taking off. A complaint, though. I was attracted to this book partly b/c of the "who done it" aspect of Ivers' murder. But the author seems to give short shrift to this part of Ivers' story. Did I miss something? I'm not even really sure of the cause of death...? And the author seemed to talk a lot about the missing wallet, but that was never connected-up to any other part of the mystery.

Altogether, this book left me with an unsatisfied feeling.
Hǻrley Quinn
I'm sorry to say... but this was a frustrating book to read. First of all, there seemed to be technical glitches with the Kindle Edition. (NOTE to Amazon) In the "cast of characters" section, for example, the names were printed as if the left-hand side of the pages were cut off for some reason. Then, as I finished the book, there was a whole list of photo credits, but NO PHOTOS! WTF? Books like this are always better if you can see the photos of the people you're reading about. Finally, the author refers you to a website for "book-extras", i.e. songs, reviews, etc. But when I found the website, most of the songs would not play! WTF?

Needless to say, the book would have been better w/o those distractions. I was never a Peter Ivers fan (didn't really know who he was) but he led an undoubtedly interesting life. I was fascinated, for instance, to learn that he was the writer/performer of the signature song in the movie "Eraserhead." I'm reminded me of a line in Bladerunner where Tyrell tells Roy Batty, "The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long - and you have burned so very, very brightly, Roy." Ivers seemed to burn-out before his time -- just as his career seemed to be taking off. A complaint, though. I was attracted to this book partly b/c of the "who done it" aspect of Ivers' murder. But the author seems to give short shrift to this part of Ivers' story. Did I miss something? I'm not even really sure of the cause of death...? And the author seemed to talk a lot about the missing wallet, but that was never connected-up to any other part of the mystery.

Altogether, this book left me with an unsatisfied feeling.
Kegal
item arrived fast and is exactly as described, a super interesting book that puts the Peter Ivers mystery in new light,
must read for the New Wave theater fans!
Kegal
item arrived fast and is exactly as described, a super interesting book that puts the Peter Ivers mystery in new light,
must read for the New Wave theater fans!
Oghmaghma
I was pleased to learn that someone had written a book about the life of Peter Ivers, and even more pleased when I got around to reading it this past weekend. I was one of the few music fans who picked up on his 1970s LP releases and enjoyed his quirky, inventive musical sensibility. When I saw Eraserhead at its San Diego theatrical premiere in 1977 or '78, I instantly recognized his voice the first time I saw The Lady In The Radiator open her mouth to sing "In Heaven." And I remember being surprised to see him host New Wave Theater on Night Flight back in the early '80s. But I never knew much about the guy, and the fact he'd died such an awful and mysterious death made me want to know his story.

The author has done an excellent job researching his subject and I'd give the book five stars on that count. Speaking to scores of friends and associates from throughout Peter's adult life and career (there is scant attention paid to his childhood, though enough to form the basis of an understanding of what drove and challenged him as an artist and a man), this is a well fleshed out story. Moreover, the book is well crafted and structured, written in a prose that is clear, expressive and insightful. Five stars again. So often, when a famous pop (or cult) musician is given a posthumous biographical treatment in book form, one finds that the author is a longtime fan with a passionate appreciation of the artist's music, but little sense of objectivity and no gift for writing. Josh Frank and his co-author have written a book that is a touching and compelling read, which I had trouble putting down over the course of the two or three days I was engrossed in reading it. This is as much (or more so) a portrait of Peter the friend and human being as it is of Peter the musician and creative artist. The reader gets a strong sense of the atmosphere Peter lived in, whether it was the community of driven and gifted literati and creative types at Harvard University in the mid-1960s, laid-back Laurel Canyon living with hip musicians in the 70s, or the dark underbelly of LA in the 80s where Peter met his tragic demise. And this is a very suspenseful and gripping murder mystery, which the reader is left to solve. The rainy Los Angeles day on which Ivers' body was discovered left me with a sick, sad feeling, as I tossed around probable murder theories and suspects in my head and finished reading the book.

While the book is well put together and organized, there are a few things I would have liked to make it more complete. Though Josh Frank came up with a creative novelistic structure that works well in terms of presenting Ivers' life, choosing to explore personal relationships in favor of giving a detailed exposition of the events of his career, it would have been nice to include a biographical timeline section. The chapters in the book are sketchy when it comes to pinpointing the rough dates and time frames during which things happened. Nowhere in the book does it even give the fact that Peter was born in 1946 (surely any biography ought to give the year and date of birth of its subject, even if it doesn't play a major role in the narrative focus). Another drawback is that not enough effort is spent in putting Ivers' music into context and exploring how it developed over the years: from his bizarrely ingenious record debut in 1969 to his equally underappreciated 1974 Terminal Love album to the rather tawdry commercial efforts of his later life. I wish he'd given more time to interviewing some of the musicians who played with Peter on those few albums, including giving details such as names of players, session dates, etc (music fans like to know this kind of stuff). I also couldn't help noticing that no mention was made of Laurel Near, the famous Lady In The Radiator of Eraserhead who lip-synched Peter's most well-known song.

Still, it is a very worthwhile read. The stuff toward the end dealing with David Jove makes for some pretty creepy material, and you can see why some people compared that guy to Charles Manson (and why many suspected him of bearing some responsibility for Ivers' death).
Oghmaghma
I was pleased to learn that someone had written a book about the life of Peter Ivers, and even more pleased when I got around to reading it this past weekend. I was one of the few music fans who picked up on his 1970s LP releases and enjoyed his quirky, inventive musical sensibility. When I saw Eraserhead at its San Diego theatrical premiere in 1977 or '78, I instantly recognized his voice the first time I saw The Lady In The Radiator open her mouth to sing "In Heaven." And I remember being surprised to see him host New Wave Theater on Night Flight back in the early '80s. But I never knew much about the guy, and the fact he'd died such an awful and mysterious death made me want to know his story.

The author has done an excellent job researching his subject and I'd give the book five stars on that count. Speaking to scores of friends and associates from throughout Peter's adult life and career (there is scant attention paid to his childhood, though enough to form the basis of an understanding of what drove and challenged him as an artist and a man), this is a well fleshed out story. Moreover, the book is well crafted and structured, written in a prose that is clear, expressive and insightful. Five stars again. So often, when a famous pop (or cult) musician is given a posthumous biographical treatment in book form, one finds that the author is a longtime fan with a passionate appreciation of the artist's music, but little sense of objectivity and no gift for writing. Josh Frank and his co-author have written a book that is a touching and compelling read, which I had trouble putting down over the course of the two or three days I was engrossed in reading it. This is as much (or more so) a portrait of Peter the friend and human being as it is of Peter the musician and creative artist. The reader gets a strong sense of the atmosphere Peter lived in, whether it was the community of driven and gifted literati and creative types at Harvard University in the mid-1960s, laid-back Laurel Canyon living with hip musicians in the 70s, or the dark underbelly of LA in the 80s where Peter met his tragic demise. And this is a very suspenseful and gripping murder mystery, which the reader is left to solve. The rainy Los Angeles day on which Ivers' body was discovered left me with a sick, sad feeling, as I tossed around probable murder theories and suspects in my head and finished reading the book.

While the book is well put together and organized, there are a few things I would have liked to make it more complete. Though Josh Frank came up with a creative novelistic structure that works well in terms of presenting Ivers' life, choosing to explore personal relationships in favor of giving a detailed exposition of the events of his career, it would have been nice to include a biographical timeline section. The chapters in the book are sketchy when it comes to pinpointing the rough dates and time frames during which things happened. Nowhere in the book does it even give the fact that Peter was born in 1946 (surely any biography ought to give the year and date of birth of its subject, even if it doesn't play a major role in the narrative focus). Another drawback is that not enough effort is spent in putting Ivers' music into context and exploring how it developed over the years: from his bizarrely ingenious record debut in 1969 to his equally underappreciated 1974 Terminal Love album to the rather tawdry commercial efforts of his later life. I wish he'd given more time to interviewing some of the musicians who played with Peter on those few albums, including giving details such as names of players, session dates, etc (music fans like to know this kind of stuff). I also couldn't help noticing that no mention was made of Laurel Near, the famous Lady In The Radiator of Eraserhead who lip-synched Peter's most well-known song.

Still, it is a very worthwhile read. The stuff toward the end dealing with David Jove makes for some pretty creepy material, and you can see why some people compared that guy to Charles Manson (and why many suspected him of bearing some responsibility for Ivers' death).
Mr_Jeйson
I found this books's pacing, thoroughness, and tone very compelling. The set-up of biography followed by quotes from friends and then cold-case commentary worked very well and also was an effective nod and wink to the manic feel of New wave theater. Yes, Peter's death remains unsolved but one's death is certainly not the point of one's life and I think Frank does an admirable job of telling his story here. Fully enjoyable. I read it in just a few sittings and then watched best of NWT.
Mr_Jeйson
I found this books's pacing, thoroughness, and tone very compelling. The set-up of biography followed by quotes from friends and then cold-case commentary worked very well and also was an effective nod and wink to the manic feel of New wave theater. Yes, Peter's death remains unsolved but one's death is certainly not the point of one's life and I think Frank does an admirable job of telling his story here. Fully enjoyable. I read it in just a few sittings and then watched best of NWT.