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'If They Move... Kill 'Em!": The Life and Times of Sam Peckinpah epub download

by David Weddle


David Weddle's 1994 biography charts Peckinpah's journey from television journeyman to celebrated auteur to washed-up coked-out has-been with obvious humanity and a clear-eyed appreciation for what Peckinpah brought to the cinematic table.

David Weddle's 1994 biography charts Peckinpah's journey from television journeyman to celebrated auteur to washed-up coked-out has-been with obvious humanity and a clear-eyed appreciation for what Peckinpah brought to the cinematic table. Blood ballets", they were called, and "Bloody Sam" was the guy who made them

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The only major biography of Sam Peckinpah in print .

The only major biography of Sam Peckinpah in print, David Weddle's If They Move. Kill 'Em! tells the wild story of Peckinpah's life with novelistic verve and does justice to one of the most important bodies of work in American cinema.

Kill ‘Em! is the first major biography of David Samuel Peckinpah. Sam Peckinpah was born into a clan of lumberjacks, cattle ranchers, and frontier lawyers. After a hitch with the Marines, he made his way to Hollywood, where he worked on a string of low-budget features.

Sam Peckinpah's (1925 - 1984) career is yet another monument to the destructiveness of the Hollywood machine and the self-destructive tendencies of alcoholics. His best films are poised on the cusp between those two poles, a reflection of his need to please both his tight-lipped lawyer father and his overprotective, hysterical mother. Quickly becoming the hottest writer in television, Peckinpah went on to direct a phenomenal series of features, including Ride the High Country, Straw Dogs, The Getaway, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, and The Wild Bunch. The life he led - glamorous, wild, and beset by personal demons - is as vivid as his films.

Now in paperback comes the first major biography of Sam Peckinpah, who began writing scripts for "Gunsmoke, The Rifleman", and "The Westerner" and went on to direct phenomenal films such as "Riding the High Country, Straw Dogs, The Getaway, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid", and "The.

Now in paperback comes the first major biography of Sam Peckinpah, who began writing scripts for "Gunsmoke, The Rifleman", and "The Westerner" and went on to direct phenomenal films such as "Riding the High Country, Straw Dogs, The Getaway, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid", and "The Wild Bunch". 8 people like this topic.

After Sam Peckinpah's death in 1984, Weddle used Peckinpah's production files and correspondence that had been given to the . Kill 'Em!": The Life and Times of Sam Peckinpah, a biography of noted film director Sam Peckinpah.

After Sam Peckinpah's death in 1984, Weddle used Peckinpah's production files and correspondence that had been given to the library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to write a biography of the director. Kill 'Em!: The Life and Times of Sam Peckinpah was released in 1994. It was the biography that brought Weddle to Deep Space Nine and later to Battlestar Galactica. Ira Steven Behr invited Weddle to Paramount Pictures. "Writing Duo Finds 'CSI' After 'Battlestar'". Peckinpah was both a hopeless romantic and a grim nihilist, a filmmaker who defined his era as much as he was shaped by it.

Kill 'Em" is the first major biography of David Samuel Peckinpah.

The first major biography of the film director recounts his life and career, from his stint as a script-writer for the television series, "Gunsmoke," in the fifties, through his string of movies, including The Wild Bunch in 1969.

'If They Move... Kill 'Em!": The Life and Times of Sam Peckinpah epub download

ISBN13: 978-0802115461

ISBN: 0802115462

Author: David Weddle

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Arts & Literature

Language: English

Publisher: Grove Pr; 1st edition (September 1, 1994)

Pages: 578 pages

ePUB size: 1972 kb

FB2 size: 1736 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 166

Other Formats: lit lrf mobi doc

Related to 'If They Move... Kill 'Em!": The Life and Times of Sam Peckinpah ePub books

Gom
Sam Peckinpah didn't direct Hollywood classics. He directed raw, flawed, mesmerizing movies that tapped into the savage, bleeding heart of man. It was an art fueled by a life on the edge, seeking both epiphany and self-destruction. The latter came much easier.

David Weddle's 1994 biography charts Peckinpah's journey from television journeyman to celebrated auteur to washed-up coked-out has-been with obvious humanity and a clear-eyed appreciation for what Peckinpah brought to the cinematic table. Beginning with his 1969 milestone "The Wild Bunch", Peckinpah revolutionized the language of film with slow-motion, cross-cutting, and rapidfire editing, usually in sequences with much violence. "Blood ballets", they were called, and "Bloody Sam" was the guy who made them.

"With his cameras Peckinpah sought to penetrate the primitive heart of the violence, to capture both its seductiveness and its horror," Weddle writes.

But this hard-earned success of Peckinpah's was short-lived. He made a number of brilliant films in the years right after "The Wild Bunch"; arguing which, if any, are actually better than "Bunch" is the Peckinpah fan-club handshake. But Weddle notes that Peckinpah's many personal demons, fueled by alcohol and, later, cocaine, not to mention a circuitous trail of women, pushed him to a point where the films became ill-focused, "plagued by gaps in continuity, sudden lurches in tone, and scenes that were sloppily bad." The man who worked out "Wild Bunch's" amazing finale on the set devolved into a fuzzy-headed drunk.

Weddle may be better known to you, as he was to me coming in, as one of three Peckinpah authorities, known as the "Peckinpah Posse", who offer commentaries on select DVDs of Peckinpah movies. I always found Weddle to be the closest in line with my own thoughts of Peckinpah, appreciative but not worshipful of the man's output.

The book is not as steady in its POV. He notes the many flaws in "Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid", a movie I can't stand, but then spends an entire chapter on it, quoting admirers of the film like Martin Scorsese to the point he sounds like an admirer himself. "Junior Bonner", a much better film to me, one of the best Peckinpah did, gets only desultory mention.

Behind the scenes, Weddle presents piercing insights, particularly regarding Peckinpah's escalating irrationality. On "Straw Dogs", he befriended an actor playing the most villainous character and dragged him out at 3:30 in the morning of a shooting day to sit by the sea with a bottle of tequila and sing "Butterfly Mornings," a folksy love duet from his previous film "The Ballad Of Cable Hogue." There's something twistedly brilliant in that, even if Peckinpah contracted pneumonia from the episode and nearly lost the film.

By 1976, making his war film "Cross Of Iron", Peckinpah was walking through an airport swigging slivovitz with an enabling lackey, one of several "pilot fish" as Weddle calls them who latched on to Peckinpah for the ride. "Cross Of Iron" was his last decent film by most accounts, but a far cry from "Straw Dogs" and other early 1970s films.

As other reviewers note, Weddle doesn't get into Peckinpah's cinematic influences, an oversight. He does make an interesting case for Peckinpah's pathfinding television work, and champions the classic pre-"Bunch" film "Ride The High Country", all in a way that points up how Peckinpah developed the framework for his revolution to come.

Weddle doesn't make Peckinpah come alive for me as a personality, perhaps because he burned so bright that those interviewed seem somewhat singed by their closeness. But he makes me want to watch more Peckinpah. That's probably what Weddle was aiming for.
Gom
Sam Peckinpah didn't direct Hollywood classics. He directed raw, flawed, mesmerizing movies that tapped into the savage, bleeding heart of man. It was an art fueled by a life on the edge, seeking both epiphany and self-destruction. The latter came much easier.

David Weddle's 1994 biography charts Peckinpah's journey from television journeyman to celebrated auteur to washed-up coked-out has-been with obvious humanity and a clear-eyed appreciation for what Peckinpah brought to the cinematic table. Beginning with his 1969 milestone "The Wild Bunch", Peckinpah revolutionized the language of film with slow-motion, cross-cutting, and rapidfire editing, usually in sequences with much violence. "Blood ballets", they were called, and "Bloody Sam" was the guy who made them.

"With his cameras Peckinpah sought to penetrate the primitive heart of the violence, to capture both its seductiveness and its horror," Weddle writes.

But this hard-earned success of Peckinpah's was short-lived. He made a number of brilliant films in the years right after "The Wild Bunch"; arguing which, if any, are actually better than "Bunch" is the Peckinpah fan-club handshake. But Weddle notes that Peckinpah's many personal demons, fueled by alcohol and, later, cocaine, not to mention a circuitous trail of women, pushed him to a point where the films became ill-focused, "plagued by gaps in continuity, sudden lurches in tone, and scenes that were sloppily bad." The man who worked out "Wild Bunch's" amazing finale on the set devolved into a fuzzy-headed drunk.

Weddle may be better known to you, as he was to me coming in, as one of three Peckinpah authorities, known as the "Peckinpah Posse", who offer commentaries on select DVDs of Peckinpah movies. I always found Weddle to be the closest in line with my own thoughts of Peckinpah, appreciative but not worshipful of the man's output.

The book is not as steady in its POV. He notes the many flaws in "Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid", a movie I can't stand, but then spends an entire chapter on it, quoting admirers of the film like Martin Scorsese to the point he sounds like an admirer himself. "Junior Bonner", a much better film to me, one of the best Peckinpah did, gets only desultory mention.

Behind the scenes, Weddle presents piercing insights, particularly regarding Peckinpah's escalating irrationality. On "Straw Dogs", he befriended an actor playing the most villainous character and dragged him out at 3:30 in the morning of a shooting day to sit by the sea with a bottle of tequila and sing "Butterfly Mornings," a folksy love duet from his previous film "The Ballad Of Cable Hogue." There's something twistedly brilliant in that, even if Peckinpah contracted pneumonia from the episode and nearly lost the film.

By 1976, making his war film "Cross Of Iron", Peckinpah was walking through an airport swigging slivovitz with an enabling lackey, one of several "pilot fish" as Weddle calls them who latched on to Peckinpah for the ride. "Cross Of Iron" was his last decent film by most accounts, but a far cry from "Straw Dogs" and other early 1970s films.

As other reviewers note, Weddle doesn't get into Peckinpah's cinematic influences, an oversight. He does make an interesting case for Peckinpah's pathfinding television work, and champions the classic pre-"Bunch" film "Ride The High Country", all in a way that points up how Peckinpah developed the framework for his revolution to come.

Weddle doesn't make Peckinpah come alive for me as a personality, perhaps because he burned so bright that those interviewed seem somewhat singed by their closeness. But he makes me want to watch more Peckinpah. That's probably what Weddle was aiming for.
Umsida
This is one of the great all time Hollywood biographies that has been written about one of the most controversial directors ever. Everything is there the movies legendary 'Ride the High Country', 'The Wild Bunch', 'Ballad of Cable Hogue' Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid', 'Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia', 'Cross of Iron'. These will remain. His films are eminently watchable and memorable except some toward the bitter end of his career. We will not see this artistry quite like it ever again. This showing of one's heart and mind on the silver screen. Autobiographical, moving, and terrifying. The performances he got from actors and actresses is legendary and wonderful. There should have been more recognition from the industry.

David Weddle shows why there was not. Peckinpah burnt about every bridge he could, every town he encountered, every relationship he was in. This is unflinching and makes for fascinating if sad reading. Substances were abused and he destroyed himself. He could have been a potent action/drama director for decades more with his talent but he could not stand success. Enemies had to be found and destroyed even if it meant destroying himself in the meantime. The man is hard to like but yet there was honesty there among the betrayals and at least he lived burning like a meteor across the sky knowing both victory and defeat.

The memory of what the man actually was will wither but the art will remain and it is art. Scenes and characters from his movies never to be forgotten: The Wild Bunch marching to their destiny at Bloody Porch, Joel McCrea and Randolph Scott ending their careers in legendary fashion, Major Dundee mad in Mexico, Cable Hogue finding water were there wasn't any and the love of an outcast woman, Dustin Hoffman a killing machine, Pat Garrett killing himself when he kills Billy the Kid, Slim Pickens dying by a river, Warren Oates conversing with a severed head in Mexico, and the insanity of the Eastern Front in World War II as James Coburn stalks among the corpses.

It was a legacy worth remembering. David Weddle did it proud.

If we could see a 'Director's Cut' of this biography!

What is here is choice and one should never forget.
Umsida
This is one of the great all time Hollywood biographies that has been written about one of the most controversial directors ever. Everything is there the movies legendary 'Ride the High Country', 'The Wild Bunch', 'Ballad of Cable Hogue' Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid', 'Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia', 'Cross of Iron'. These will remain. His films are eminently watchable and memorable except some toward the bitter end of his career. We will not see this artistry quite like it ever again. This showing of one's heart and mind on the silver screen. Autobiographical, moving, and terrifying. The performances he got from actors and actresses is legendary and wonderful. There should have been more recognition from the industry.

David Weddle shows why there was not. Peckinpah burnt about every bridge he could, every town he encountered, every relationship he was in. This is unflinching and makes for fascinating if sad reading. Substances were abused and he destroyed himself. He could have been a potent action/drama director for decades more with his talent but he could not stand success. Enemies had to be found and destroyed even if it meant destroying himself in the meantime. The man is hard to like but yet there was honesty there among the betrayals and at least he lived burning like a meteor across the sky knowing both victory and defeat.

The memory of what the man actually was will wither but the art will remain and it is art. Scenes and characters from his movies never to be forgotten: The Wild Bunch marching to their destiny at Bloody Porch, Joel McCrea and Randolph Scott ending their careers in legendary fashion, Major Dundee mad in Mexico, Cable Hogue finding water were there wasn't any and the love of an outcast woman, Dustin Hoffman a killing machine, Pat Garrett killing himself when he kills Billy the Kid, Slim Pickens dying by a river, Warren Oates conversing with a severed head in Mexico, and the insanity of the Eastern Front in World War II as James Coburn stalks among the corpses.

It was a legacy worth remembering. David Weddle did it proud.

If we could see a 'Director's Cut' of this biography!

What is here is choice and one should never forget.