» » Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Between a Rock and a Hard Place epub download

by Aron Ralston


Between a Rock and a Hard Place is the autobiography of Aron Ralston

Between a Rock and a Hard Place is the autobiography of Aron Ralston.

Home Aron Ralston Between a Rock and a Hard Place. All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form whatsoever. For information address Atria Books, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020. ISBN-13: 978-1-4165-0510-5. ISBN-10: 1-4165-0510-5. ATRIABOOKS is a trademark of Simon & Schuster, Inc. Designed by Helene Berinsky.

Книга жанра: Детективы, Триллеры. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. Passion: That which I suffer, allow, endure, is done to me. But once your crew has rowed you past the Sirens. a choice of routes is yours. I cannot advise you. which to take, or lead you through it all-. you must decide for yourself-. but I can tell you the ways of either course. On one side beetling cliffs shoot up, and against them. pound the huge roaring breakers of blue-eyed Amphitrite-. the Clashing Rocks they’re called by all the blissful gods.

I cannot advise you which to take, or lead you through it all- you must decide for yourself- but I can tell you the ways of either course.

His first book, Between a Rock and a Hard Place, was a New York Times bestseller and was adapted into the major motion picture 127 Hours by Danny Boyle. Today, as a father of an infant daughter and four-year-old son, Aron lives in Boulder, Colorado

His first book, Between a Rock and a Hard Place, was a New York Times bestseller and was adapted into the major motion picture 127 Hours by Danny Boyle. Today, as a father of an infant daughter and four-year-old son, Aron lives in Boulder, Colorado.

There are many such places. Aron Ralston went to Utah as just another rock jock; he emerges as a Gen X action hero. Daily News -Sherryl Connelly. There's no limit to the human capacity for the homing sentiment. Theologians, sky pilots, astronauts have even felt the appeal of home calling to them from up above, in the cold black outback of interstellar space.

About the Author - Aron Ralsted - Aron Ralston grew up in the Midwest before moving to Colorado when he was twelve, a place where he became an avid outdoorsman. In 2002, he gave up a career as a mechanical engineer in New Mexico and moved to Aspen, Colorado, where among other things he continued his attempt to climb the fifty-nine Colorado peaks of more than 14,000 feet solo in winter (he's more than three-quarters through).

In the final part of our serialisation of his harrowing tale, Aron Ralston recalls the last hours of his ordeal in the Utah wilderness. After six days trapped by the boulder, he at last found the courage and the means to sever his crushed hand and free himself.

In the book, Aron Ralston is plagued by one-upmanship syndrome. The book should be a guide to avoiding wedging your arm between stones in desolate wilderness.

Sep 09, 2008 Michael rated it it was ok. Shelves: non-fiction, travel-adventure. In the book, Aron Ralston is plagued by one-upmanship syndrome. Rather it is a distasteful brag-fest of Ralston's overzealous adventure practices. Events such as these lead to the closure of recreation areas every year in suit-happy America. I would I have read a few Mountaineering books, and as a all around wilderness junkie, I was quite unsettled by this book.

Between a Rock and a Hard Place. Author: Aron Ralston. It started out as a simple hike in the Utah canyonlands on a warm Saturday afternoon. For Aron Ralston, a d mountaineer and outdoorsman, a walk into the remote Blue John Canyon was a chance to get a break from a winter of solo climbing Colorado’s highest and toughest peaks

One of the most extraordinary survival stories ever told -- Aron Ralston's searing account of his six days trapped in one of the most remote spots in America, and how one inspired act of bravery brought him home. It started out as a simple hike in the Utah canyonlands on a warm Saturday afternoon. For Aron Ralston, a twenty-seven-year-old mountaineer and outdoorsman, a walk into the remote Blue John Canyon was a chance to get a break from a winter of solo climbing Colorado's highest and toughest peaks. He'd earned this weekend vacation, and though he met two charming women along the way, by early afternoon he finally found himself in his element: alone, with just the beauty of the natural world all around him. It was 2:41 P.M. Eight miles from his truck, in a deep and narrow slot canyon, Aron was climbing down off a wedged boulder when the rock suddenly, and terrifyingly, came loose. Before he could get out of the way, the falling stone pinned his right hand and wrist against the canyon wall. And so began six days of hell for Aron Ralston. With scant water and little food, no jacket for the painfully cold nights, and the terrible knowledge that he'd told no one where he was headed, he found himself facing a lingering death -- trapped by an 800-pound boulder 100 feet down in the bottom of a canyon. As he eliminated his escape options one by one through the days, Aron faced the full horror of his predicament: By the time any possible search and rescue effort would begin, he'd most probably have died of dehydration, if a flash flood didn't drown him before that. What does one do in the face of almost certain death? Using the video camera from his pack, Aron began recording his grateful good-byes to his family and friends all over the country, thinking back over a life filled with adventure, and documenting a last will and testament with the hope that someone would find it. (For their part, his family and friends had instigated a major search for Aron, the amazing details of which are also documented here for the first time.) The knowledge of their love kept Aron Ralston alive, until a divine inspiration on Thursday morning solved the riddle of the boulder. Aron then committed the most extreme act imaginable to save himself. Between a Rock and a Hard Place -- a brilliantly written, funny, honest, inspiring, and downright astonishing report from the line where death meets life -- will surely take its place in the annals of classic adventure stories.

Between a Rock and a Hard Place epub download

ISBN13: 978-0743492812

ISBN: 0743492811

Author: Aron Ralston

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Arts & Literature

Language: English

Publisher: Atria Books; 1st Atria Books Hardcover Ed edition (September 7, 2004)

Pages: 354 pages

ePUB size: 1186 kb

FB2 size: 1976 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 265

Other Formats: txt doc mbr azw

Related to Between a Rock and a Hard Place ePub books

Malalrajas
Incredible story but I found it hard to get into until the second half. The author starts out explaining how he got trapped then spends chapters detailing his many climbing and rafting adventures in which he pushed himself and took great risks to himself (and others). This was almost half the book, told in great technical detail with little emotional content. I skimmed over most of this and almost stopped reading the book.
I have read other books in this genre- Into Thin Air, 6 Below, etc which include technical climbing detail but it was understandable and necessary to the larger narrative. Here it just seemed to be filler- as though he had to recount every adventure and close call he had up until the final one.
The story of his entrapment(second half) increasingly dire predicament, his thoughts and description of how he finally escaped WAS an amazing and compelling story.
Malalrajas
Incredible story but I found it hard to get into until the second half. The author starts out explaining how he got trapped then spends chapters detailing his many climbing and rafting adventures in which he pushed himself and took great risks to himself (and others). This was almost half the book, told in great technical detail with little emotional content. I skimmed over most of this and almost stopped reading the book.
I have read other books in this genre- Into Thin Air, 6 Below, etc which include technical climbing detail but it was understandable and necessary to the larger narrative. Here it just seemed to be filler- as though he had to recount every adventure and close call he had up until the final one.
The story of his entrapment(second half) increasingly dire predicament, his thoughts and description of how he finally escaped WAS an amazing and compelling story.
Gholbirius
I felt like I was in that canyon with Aron. He created a mental picture that made me feel as desperate to read more to free him from the boulder. I am glad he made it out and his story inspires me in so many ways. I am glad to see he is striving to be a beacon of hope for those who feel their life is trapped. The only thing I would say lagged for me was the long flashbacks to other adventures. Each was unique and a story worth telling, but the stories may have been better suited to stand on their own. I found the length of those chapters to be distracting. But overall, it was an epic read. Aron is a unique individual. I am glad I got to know him a little through his book.
Gholbirius
I felt like I was in that canyon with Aron. He created a mental picture that made me feel as desperate to read more to free him from the boulder. I am glad he made it out and his story inspires me in so many ways. I am glad to see he is striving to be a beacon of hope for those who feel their life is trapped. The only thing I would say lagged for me was the long flashbacks to other adventures. Each was unique and a story worth telling, but the stories may have been better suited to stand on their own. I found the length of those chapters to be distracting. But overall, it was an epic read. Aron is a unique individual. I am glad I got to know him a little through his book.
Westened
Book Description

In April 2003, 28-year-old Aron Ralston took a day trip in Blue John Canyon in Utah's Canyonlands National Park. Shortly after beginning his solo excursion into the canyon, a boulder came loose and pinned Ralston's right arm between it and the canyon wall. Unable to free his arm, Ralston was trapped for 127 hours (more than 5 days) with limited water and food. Because Ralston had broken one of the cardinal rules of outdoor pursuits (always let someone know where you are going), no one knew where he was (or even to come looking for him) until he didn't show up for work on Monday. His account of the ordeal and his eventual decision to save himself by amputating his right arm is documented in this well-written (and surprisingly funny) memoir.

My Thoughts

When watching 127 Hours, I was absolutely mesmerized by Ralston's predicament. (It didn't hurt that Ralston was portrayed by James Franco and the movie directed by Danny Boyle.) After watching the film, I wanted to get the full story about what Ralston had experienced. Did he really have a vision of his future son that bolstered his courage? Did he really talk into his video camera during his entrapment? Why had he made such a fundamentally stupid mistake by not telling anyone about his whereabouts? The book answered all these questions and provided much more detail into Ralston's personality and background.

In fact, after reading the book, I'm not completely surprised that Ralston found himself in his predicament. In the book, he recounts several near-death experiences he faced during various other outdoor pursuits (from almost drowning in the Grand Canyon to being buried under an avalanche). Ralston's whole life was (and is) about pushing himself in the outdoors--often in ways that others might consider foolish or overly risky. In addition, solo adventuring was nothing new to Ralston. At the time of his entrapment, he was pursuing his quest to make the first solo ascents of all "fourteeners" (mountains over 14,000 feet) in Colorado. The one line in the movie that stuck with me--"This rock had been waiting for me all my life"--really sums up Ralston's life. (I may be misremembering the exact line but it is something fairly close to this.)

Did he leave the canyon a changed man--aside from the obvious loss of his right arm? Spiritually, Ralston matured--coming to a new appreciation for life and his loved ones. What the experience didn't do was dampen his enthusiasm for outdoor pursuits. Working with prosthetics and climbing companies, Ralston designed a prosthetic arm for himself so he could continue rock climbing and mountain climbing.

The book is surprisingly well written. After all, just because you have the guts to amputate your own arm and survive for five days in a canyon with limited food and water doesn't mean you'll be able to tell your story eloquently. But Ralston (who was an engineer before quitting corporate life to pursue the outdoor life in Colorado) seems to be a true Renaissance man--crafting a well-rounded, eloquent and often amusing account of his life, philosophy and the accident changed him forever.

Finally, I must mention that the book includes a collection of full-color photographs of Ralston before, during and after the accident. I had a rather morbid fascination with these photos (including the one of the severed arm immediately after the amputation), but they really did add to the story. It was amazing to see the exact place where this took place and what Ralston looked like during his entrapment. I also need to give a shout-out to the filmmakers for seeming to recreate Ralston's predicament, clothing, and equipment down to the smallest detail.

Recommended For: Readers who enjoy gripping and well-told adventure/survival stories, fans of the movie 127 Hours, and anyone looking for real-life survival story that demonstrates what people will do to survive.
Westened
Book Description

In April 2003, 28-year-old Aron Ralston took a day trip in Blue John Canyon in Utah's Canyonlands National Park. Shortly after beginning his solo excursion into the canyon, a boulder came loose and pinned Ralston's right arm between it and the canyon wall. Unable to free his arm, Ralston was trapped for 127 hours (more than 5 days) with limited water and food. Because Ralston had broken one of the cardinal rules of outdoor pursuits (always let someone know where you are going), no one knew where he was (or even to come looking for him) until he didn't show up for work on Monday. His account of the ordeal and his eventual decision to save himself by amputating his right arm is documented in this well-written (and surprisingly funny) memoir.

My Thoughts

When watching 127 Hours, I was absolutely mesmerized by Ralston's predicament. (It didn't hurt that Ralston was portrayed by James Franco and the movie directed by Danny Boyle.) After watching the film, I wanted to get the full story about what Ralston had experienced. Did he really have a vision of his future son that bolstered his courage? Did he really talk into his video camera during his entrapment? Why had he made such a fundamentally stupid mistake by not telling anyone about his whereabouts? The book answered all these questions and provided much more detail into Ralston's personality and background.

In fact, after reading the book, I'm not completely surprised that Ralston found himself in his predicament. In the book, he recounts several near-death experiences he faced during various other outdoor pursuits (from almost drowning in the Grand Canyon to being buried under an avalanche). Ralston's whole life was (and is) about pushing himself in the outdoors--often in ways that others might consider foolish or overly risky. In addition, solo adventuring was nothing new to Ralston. At the time of his entrapment, he was pursuing his quest to make the first solo ascents of all "fourteeners" (mountains over 14,000 feet) in Colorado. The one line in the movie that stuck with me--"This rock had been waiting for me all my life"--really sums up Ralston's life. (I may be misremembering the exact line but it is something fairly close to this.)

Did he leave the canyon a changed man--aside from the obvious loss of his right arm? Spiritually, Ralston matured--coming to a new appreciation for life and his loved ones. What the experience didn't do was dampen his enthusiasm for outdoor pursuits. Working with prosthetics and climbing companies, Ralston designed a prosthetic arm for himself so he could continue rock climbing and mountain climbing.

The book is surprisingly well written. After all, just because you have the guts to amputate your own arm and survive for five days in a canyon with limited food and water doesn't mean you'll be able to tell your story eloquently. But Ralston (who was an engineer before quitting corporate life to pursue the outdoor life in Colorado) seems to be a true Renaissance man--crafting a well-rounded, eloquent and often amusing account of his life, philosophy and the accident changed him forever.

Finally, I must mention that the book includes a collection of full-color photographs of Ralston before, during and after the accident. I had a rather morbid fascination with these photos (including the one of the severed arm immediately after the amputation), but they really did add to the story. It was amazing to see the exact place where this took place and what Ralston looked like during his entrapment. I also need to give a shout-out to the filmmakers for seeming to recreate Ralston's predicament, clothing, and equipment down to the smallest detail.

Recommended For: Readers who enjoy gripping and well-told adventure/survival stories, fans of the movie 127 Hours, and anyone looking for real-life survival story that demonstrates what people will do to survive.
Rocky Basilisk
I don't ever want to be too hard on a book, because I enjoy the act of reading regardless (usually) of the content. I have always been enthralled by this story, and followed it pretty closely in the news. I expected the book to be an insider view of what Aron dealt with while trapped by the boulder. Well, that story is in there, but so is a lot of fluff. Aron tells story after story after story of his climbing prowess, usually about something death-defying. In fact, reading the book, it's amazing he lived long enough to get his arm trapped. The stories tend to come off in a braggadocios manner, like Aron is trying to prove how awesome he is as if people are out there saying he's not. Reading about his time trapped in the canyon was thrilling. It is a great story that involves facing death and the will to survive against all odds. The stories that take place outside of the canyon, even his recounting of his friends and family back home preparing to search for him, are painful at best. The book would have rated at 5 stars if all of the fluff had never been added.
Rocky Basilisk
I don't ever want to be too hard on a book, because I enjoy the act of reading regardless (usually) of the content. I have always been enthralled by this story, and followed it pretty closely in the news. I expected the book to be an insider view of what Aron dealt with while trapped by the boulder. Well, that story is in there, but so is a lot of fluff. Aron tells story after story after story of his climbing prowess, usually about something death-defying. In fact, reading the book, it's amazing he lived long enough to get his arm trapped. The stories tend to come off in a braggadocios manner, like Aron is trying to prove how awesome he is as if people are out there saying he's not. Reading about his time trapped in the canyon was thrilling. It is a great story that involves facing death and the will to survive against all odds. The stories that take place outside of the canyon, even his recounting of his friends and family back home preparing to search for him, are painful at best. The book would have rated at 5 stars if all of the fluff had never been added.