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Shakespeare's Wife epub download

by GERMAINE GREER


Also by Germaine Greer. To Professor Anne Barton

Also by Germaine Greer. To Professor Anne Barton. Her given name and approximate birth date were known from her tomb in Holy Trinity Church Stratford; Shakespeare’s first biographer, Nicholas Rowe, supplied her maiden surname, and there matters rested until 1790.

It is Germaine Greer's laudable aim in Shakespeare's Wife to rescue this woman seemingly condemned to the shadows . But this would not be a book by Germaine Greer if it did not also include a generous dollop of controversy. Her book has an agenda.

It is Germaine Greer's laudable aim in Shakespeare's Wife to rescue this woman seemingly condemned to the shadows at the edge of her famous husband's life, to retrieve some kind of individuality for her, and to "re-embed" the story of their marriage "in its social context". In part her book succeeds in this mission.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Little is known about Ann Hathaway, the wife of England's greatest playwright; a great deal has been assumed.

Germaine Greer ve with his wife’, which sugges.

E. A. Honigman too thinks this to be the case. 2 The lost years are simply that; from the christening of the twins to Shakespeare’s emergence on the London stage we have no idea what he might have been doing or where he, or he and his family, might have been

Germaine Greer (/ɡrɪər/; born 29 January 1939) is an Australian writer and public intellectual, regarded as one of the major voices of the second-wave feminist movement in the latter half of the 20th century. Specializing in English and women's.

Germaine Greer (/ɡrɪər/; born 29 January 1939) is an Australian writer and public intellectual, regarded as one of the major voices of the second-wave feminist movement in the latter half of the 20th century. Specializing in English and women's literature, she has held academic positions in England at the University of Warwick and Newnham College, Cambridge, and in the United States at the University of Tulsa

Germaine Greer’s task in her ingenious new book, Shakespeare’s Wife, is to expose the construction of this fantasy, tracing its evolution from early biographers like Thomas de Quincey through the work of respected modern scholars like Stephen Greenblatt.

Germaine Greer’s task in her ingenious new book, Shakespeare’s Wife, is to expose the construction of this fantasy, tracing its evolution from early biographers like Thomas de Quincey through the work of respected modern scholars like Stephen Greenblatt. The Shakespeare wallahs, she writes, have succeeded in creating a Bard in their own likeness, that is to say, incapable of relating to women.

Yet Shakespeare is above all the poet of marriage. Before him, there were few comedies or tragedies about wooing or wedding. And yet he explored the sacrament in all its aspects, spiritual, psychological, sexual, sociological, and was the creator of some of the most tenacious and intelligent heroines in English literature.

Here Germaine Greer strives to re-embed the story of their marriage in its social context and presents new hypotheses about the life of the farmer's daughter who married our greatest poet

Here Germaine Greer strives to re-embed the story of their marriage in its social context and presents new hypotheses about the life of the farmer's daughter who married our greatest poet.

Here Germaine Greer strives to re-embed the story of their marriage in its social context and presents new hypotheses about the life of the farmer's daughter who married our greatest poet.

Little is known of the wife of England's greatest playwright. Here Germaine Greer strives to re-embed the story of their marriage in its social context and presents new hypotheses about the life of the farmer's daughter who married our greatest poet. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

In Shakespeare's Wife, Germaine Greer boldly breaks new ground, combining literary-historical techniques with documentary evidence about life in Stratford, to reset the story of Shakespeare's marriage in its social context

In Shakespeare's Wife, Germaine Greer boldly breaks new ground, combining literary-historical techniques with documentary evidence about life in Stratford, to reset the story of Shakespeare's marriage in its social context. With deep insight and intelligence, she offers daring and thoughtful new theories about the farmer's daughter who married England's greatest poet, painting a vivid portrait of a remarkable woman.

Little is known about Ann Hathaway, the wife of England's greatest playwright; a great deal has been assumed, none of it complimentary. In Shakespeare's Wife, Germaine Greer boldly breaks new ground, reclaiming this much maligned figure from generations of scholarly neglect and misogyny. With deep insight and intelligence, she offers daring and thoughtful new theories about the farmer's daughter who married Britain's immortal Bard, painting a vivid portrait of a truly remarkable woman.

Shakespeare's Wife epub download

ISBN13: 978-0747593003

ISBN: 0747593000

Author: GERMAINE GREER

Category: Bio and Memoris

Subcategory: Arts & Literature

Language: English

Publisher: BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLC; 2008 edition (2008)

ePUB size: 1996 kb

FB2 size: 1156 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 747

Other Formats: lrf azw azw lrf

Related to Shakespeare's Wife ePub books

Elildelm
Of course William Shakespeare was unhappily married. Why else would he leave his wife, "the older, designing woman," Ann Hathaway? This has been the conclusion of scholars for the past 400 years, based on the barest shred of evidence. In fact, there is as much evidence that Shakespeare was happily married as not, as Germaine Greer makes perfectly clear in "Shakespeare's Wife."

But what does Shakespeare say? A reading of his plays tells quite a different story. While scholars have searched in vain for a consistent philosophical thread running through his plays, the Bard is very consistent when it comes to women and marriage. He adored women, and portrayed a good marriage as something heroic. Shakespeare created a series of female characters who were both passionate and pure, who gave their hearts spontaneously into the keeping of the men they loved and remained true to the bargain in the face of tremendous odds. The men in The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, and The Winter's Tale, all err in not trusting their wives. While female characters, having spontaneously and often suddenly committed themselves to a man, never swerve from the commitment, though in respecting it they may be called up to risk their lives, the male characters will break their vows at the drop of a hat. The inconstancy of men causes no great upheaval in the Shakespeare world, but when the solidity and truth of women are undermined, as in Titus Andronicus, Troilus and Cressida, and King Lear, the world regresses to savagery. Order is restored when men come to their senses regarding women.

So why the prejudice against Ann Hathaway by Shakespearean scholars who should know better? Writes Greer: "The possibility that a wife might have been closer to their idol than they could ever be, understood him better than they ever could, could not be entertained."

What do we as readers make of this? Scholars are people too. As Shakespeare himself might put it:

. . . scholar, proud scholar,
Dress'd in a little brief authority,
Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd--
His glassy essence--like an angry ape
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
As makes the angels weep . . .

Read this book. It's a breath of fresh air in a world made stale by dry scholarship.
Elildelm
Of course William Shakespeare was unhappily married. Why else would he leave his wife, "the older, designing woman," Ann Hathaway? This has been the conclusion of scholars for the past 400 years, based on the barest shred of evidence. In fact, there is as much evidence that Shakespeare was happily married as not, as Germaine Greer makes perfectly clear in "Shakespeare's Wife."

But what does Shakespeare say? A reading of his plays tells quite a different story. While scholars have searched in vain for a consistent philosophical thread running through his plays, the Bard is very consistent when it comes to women and marriage. He adored women, and portrayed a good marriage as something heroic. Shakespeare created a series of female characters who were both passionate and pure, who gave their hearts spontaneously into the keeping of the men they loved and remained true to the bargain in the face of tremendous odds. The men in The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, and The Winter's Tale, all err in not trusting their wives. While female characters, having spontaneously and often suddenly committed themselves to a man, never swerve from the commitment, though in respecting it they may be called up to risk their lives, the male characters will break their vows at the drop of a hat. The inconstancy of men causes no great upheaval in the Shakespeare world, but when the solidity and truth of women are undermined, as in Titus Andronicus, Troilus and Cressida, and King Lear, the world regresses to savagery. Order is restored when men come to their senses regarding women.

So why the prejudice against Ann Hathaway by Shakespearean scholars who should know better? Writes Greer: "The possibility that a wife might have been closer to their idol than they could ever be, understood him better than they ever could, could not be entertained."

What do we as readers make of this? Scholars are people too. As Shakespeare himself might put it:

. . . scholar, proud scholar,
Dress'd in a little brief authority,
Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd--
His glassy essence--like an angry ape
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
As makes the angels weep . . .

Read this book. It's a breath of fresh air in a world made stale by dry scholarship.
Sironynyr
The most popular Shakespeare biographies are mostly fiction. They rarely contribute any useful understanding of the plays and poems and I would not recommend any of them.
In contrast, the gold standard for honest reporting of the facts and gentle debunking of the myths is William Shakespeare: A Documentary Life (or the Compact Documentary Life). If you haven't read that, you can't be sure you know anything reliable about the Bard's meager facts. Schoenbaum may even innoculate you against the ravages of unbridled speculation you will encounter everywhere else.
After Schoenbaum's book, I might well recommend this one for the quality of the research and the alternative view it offers.
Although I found many of Greer's conjectures no more compelling than most Shakespeare biographers', some of them are quite convincing and her facts are a knockout.
Her uncovering of the history of New Place strongly supports her conjecture that it was a rundown mess that went for a song. Her study of malting and brewing in Stratford gives a lot of credence to her suggestion that Ann was running that business, especially since their 80 bushel year came at the presumed peak of Shakespeare's literary production. Her coverage of the Grevilles' and Combe's actions in the enclosure battles and the contrast in the respective reactions of Shakespeare and Richard Quiney is outstanding. Her analysis of 16th Century reports of the progress of syphilis symptoms and treatments of the time offers new insight into a common hypothesis for Shakespeare's abandonment of theater in his late 40's and for the darkness of his retirement to Stratford.
I would say the research here is top-notch, provocative and a perfect addition to Schoenbaum's sober classic. I think it is possible to disagree with many of Greer's conjectures and still be very grateful for the light her research throws on many of the accepted facts. If you next move on to Will Power: Essays on Shakespearean Authority, in three books you will have a better understanding of Shakespearean issues than many biographers appear to have.
The Kindle edition is very good.
I would give the book 4 1/2 stars. So I am rounding up, not because it is perfect, but because it stands head and shoulders above most of the field and is rare in its quality and readability.
Sironynyr
The most popular Shakespeare biographies are mostly fiction. They rarely contribute any useful understanding of the plays and poems and I would not recommend any of them.
In contrast, the gold standard for honest reporting of the facts and gentle debunking of the myths is William Shakespeare: A Documentary Life (or the Compact Documentary Life). If you haven't read that, you can't be sure you know anything reliable about the Bard's meager facts. Schoenbaum may even innoculate you against the ravages of unbridled speculation you will encounter everywhere else.
After Schoenbaum's book, I might well recommend this one for the quality of the research and the alternative view it offers.
Although I found many of Greer's conjectures no more compelling than most Shakespeare biographers', some of them are quite convincing and her facts are a knockout.
Her uncovering of the history of New Place strongly supports her conjecture that it was a rundown mess that went for a song. Her study of malting and brewing in Stratford gives a lot of credence to her suggestion that Ann was running that business, especially since their 80 bushel year came at the presumed peak of Shakespeare's literary production. Her coverage of the Grevilles' and Combe's actions in the enclosure battles and the contrast in the respective reactions of Shakespeare and Richard Quiney is outstanding. Her analysis of 16th Century reports of the progress of syphilis symptoms and treatments of the time offers new insight into a common hypothesis for Shakespeare's abandonment of theater in his late 40's and for the darkness of his retirement to Stratford.
I would say the research here is top-notch, provocative and a perfect addition to Schoenbaum's sober classic. I think it is possible to disagree with many of Greer's conjectures and still be very grateful for the light her research throws on many of the accepted facts. If you next move on to Will Power: Essays on Shakespearean Authority, in three books you will have a better understanding of Shakespearean issues than many biographers appear to have.
The Kindle edition is very good.
I would give the book 4 1/2 stars. So I am rounding up, not because it is perfect, but because it stands head and shoulders above most of the field and is rare in its quality and readability.