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Lens of an Infantryman: A World War II Memoir with Photographs from a Hidden Camera epub download

by Murray Leff


Leff's book chiefly consists of a 77-page narrative of his ETO experiences up to February 1945, a second . In that respect LENS OF AN INFANTRYMAN offers a valuable insight into the life of a typical line doggie in World War II.

Leff's book chiefly consists of a 77-page narrative of his ETO experiences up to February 1945, a second - largely photographic - 62-page section that covers his ETO time from March to May 1945 and a 45-page appendix that reproduces the daily Company E combat reports sent to Division HQ, therein supplementing Leff's foxhole-level observations with the 'big picture. The narrative only runs to February 1945 because he was discharged before he could complete the manuscript).

Lens of an Infantryman book. After he arrived in Europe with the 35th Infantry Division, Murray. These and many more photographs are part of this memoir, which records Leff's World War II experiences from Gremercey Forest through the Battle of the Bulge, the Ruhr Pocket and the fall of Germany.

By hiding that camera under his field jacket, Leff was a. Don't worry, we hate spam too, we will not send you anything other than great books.

This memoir presents many of the photographs that Leff captured with that camera, and records his World War II experiences from Gremercey Forest .

This memoir presents many of the photographs that Leff captured with that camera, and records his World War II experiences from Gremercey Forest through the Battle of the Bulge, the Ruhr Pocket and the fall of Germany" Provided by publisher. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Books with the subject: War Photography. Lens of an Infantryman: A World War II Memoir with Photographs from a Hidden Camera - Murray Leff. Regarding the Pain of Others - Susan Sontag. Atrocities, Violence, war and Society, Mass Media and war, war Photography, Social Aspects, war in Mass Media, war in art, Psychological Aspects, Photojournalism. The Photographer, The - Emmanuel Guibert.

Murray Leff, 94, at home in Bellerose, Queens, has updated his camera equipment from the Leica he used to photograph his WWII experiences, which are published in "Lens of an Infantryman: A World War II Memoir with Photographs from a Hidden Camera

Murray Leff, 94, at home in Bellerose, Queens, has updated his camera equipment from the Leica he used to photograph his WWII experiences, which are published in "Lens of an Infantryman: A World War II Memoir with Photographs from a Hidden Camera. This is real war, not what they let you see in the news," Leff says of his images. By Martin C. Evans martin.

When you want to learn about World War II, hear it. .This book was born out of a series of articles that Webster wrote for the Saturday Evening Post. Well written WWII memoirs not only tell a person's experience, they also weave into the story facts of the War, thus teaching readers history.

When you want to learn about World War II, hear it from people who were there. It's a fascinating read on so many levels. Webster, who died in a boating accident in 1961, became featured in Stephen Ambrose's Band of Brothers, the now well-known book about E Company of the 506th Regiment of the 101st Airborne. He had been unable to obtain a publisher in his lifetime. Many of us remember being taught history by having to remember exact dates.

Photographs from the ‘Banquet of the mutilated faces’, the depiction of Hitler in Tyrolean traditional costume, and . A French soldier in the trenches of First World War, wearing a homemade suit of armor to protect himself against flying bullets. Location unknown, 1915. Photographer unknown.

Photographs from the ‘Banquet of the mutilated faces’, the depiction of Hitler in Tyrolean traditional costume, and a photograph of a man with his nine-year-old wife. An artist from Circus Busch wrestles with crocodiles in an old mine wagon converted into an aquarium. Photographer unknown (Ewing Galloway Agency). The Italian explorer Attilio Gatti with two pygmy servants and a gorilla they have captured.

This book is an exciting personal WW2 story which holds the readers interest from beginning to end -- a true page turner of fast moving . All contributed to a terrific background for the rigors of becoming a well-trained infantryman.

This book is an exciting personal WW2 story which holds the readers interest from beginning to end -- a true page turner of fast moving events. After completing three months of rough training in the swamps of Oregon, he was selected and qualified to attend West Point.

The photographs that emerged from the Nazi-lead concentration camps are among some of the most horrifying ever produced, let .

The photographs that emerged from the Nazi-lead concentration camps are among some of the most horrifying ever produced, let alone during World War II. The images remain clear in one’s mind, families being captured and separated, emaciated bodies in barracks. This 1944 photograph shows a pile of remaining bones at the Nazi concentration camp of Majdanek, the second largest death camp in Poland after Auschwitz. The photograph was originally captioned, American invaders spring from the ramp of a Coast Guard-manned landing barge to wade those last perilous yards to the beach of Normandy. Enemy fire will cut some of them down.

After he arrived in Europe with the 35th Infantry Division, Murray Leff traded his cigarette ration for a 35mm camera. By hiding that camera under his field jacket, Leff was able to carry it into battle to record some of the war's most heated fighting. Photographs snapped while he crouched in a water-filled ditch show Leff's rifle squad burying their heads in mud as enemy shells come in. Images show a supporting tank on its arrival and later, smoldering from a direct hit by German fire. These and many more photographs are part of this memoir, which records Leff's World War II experiences from Gremercey Forest through the Battle of the Bulge, the Ruhr Pocket and the fall of Germany.

Lens of an Infantryman: A World War II Memoir with Photographs from a Hidden Camera epub download

ISBN13: 978-0786428670

ISBN: 0786428678

Author: Murray Leff

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Photography & Video

Language: English

Publisher: McFarland & Company (July 3, 2007)

Pages: 207 pages

ePUB size: 1534 kb

FB2 size: 1772 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 461

Other Formats: lrf rtf mobi azw

Related to Lens of an Infantryman: A World War II Memoir with Photographs from a Hidden Camera ePub books

Dolid
Actually, Murray Leff and I have known each other for most of my life, but I did not know, until recently, that he was a photographer and author. He recently presented a lot of the material in this book at our local camera club and he is a wonderful presenter, wit a great sense of humor. This is fascinating and some of the images will never leave your mind.
Dolid
Actually, Murray Leff and I have known each other for most of my life, but I did not know, until recently, that he was a photographer and author. He recently presented a lot of the material in this book at our local camera club and he is a wonderful presenter, wit a great sense of humor. This is fascinating and some of the images will never leave your mind.
Malakelv
Murray Leff saw ETO combat with Company E, 2nd Battalion, 137th Regiment, 35th Infantry Division from September 1944 to VE-Day. Atypically, Murray went to war armed with a Garand rifle AND a Welti folding bellows camera he had acquired in a swap for cigarettes. Line infantrymen were forbidden from carrying cameras into combat yet Leff kept - and used - his camera throughout his time in Europe. Fifty-seven years later he combined those long-ago photos with a narrative he had written just at war's end to produce this rare illustrated guide to one G.I.'s wartime experiences.

Leff's book chiefly consists of a 77-page narrative of his ETO experiences up to February 1945, a second - largely photographic - 62-page section that covers his ETO time from March to May 1945 and a 45-page appendix that reproduces the daily Company E combat reports sent to Division HQ, therein supplementing Leff's foxhole-level observations with the 'big picture.' (The narrative only runs to February 1945 because he was discharged before he could complete the manuscript).

Leff's war wasn't one of endless heart-pounding advances and set-piece battles but rather of long periods of inactivity holding the line, breaks for behind-the-lines R&R followed by more marches, new positions, late-night patrols, etc. Casualties were mercifully few and often were victims of random shellfire, a chance encounter with a German MG position, etc. As with most dogfaces, much of Leff's time was spent digging in, trying to keep warm and so on. In that respect LENS OF AN INFANTRYMAN offers a valuable insight into the life of a typical line doggie in World War II.

The over 90 wartime photographs featured in the book reflect Leff's 'long periods of tedium pierced by moments of stark terror' existence. There are a number of shots of Company E personnel in action and behind the lines; American tanks, trucks and other equipment; civilians welcoming the Americans, GIs examining a dead German soldier, etc. Several sequences are quite striking - one showing a Sherman taking up a firing position only to be hit by a 88mm gun; Leff's squad seeking cover in a water-filled ditch as an MG opens up on them; etc.

Since the narrative was written just months after the events happened, LENS OF AN INFANTRYMAN has a rare freshness and emphasis on daily life missing from other accounts of G.I.s at war. The photos though elevate the book to a higher level, offering a rare perspective on the life of a combat infantryman. Murray Leff's book comes highly recommended.
Malakelv
Murray Leff saw ETO combat with Company E, 2nd Battalion, 137th Regiment, 35th Infantry Division from September 1944 to VE-Day. Atypically, Murray went to war armed with a Garand rifle AND a Welti folding bellows camera he had acquired in a swap for cigarettes. Line infantrymen were forbidden from carrying cameras into combat yet Leff kept - and used - his camera throughout his time in Europe. Fifty-seven years later he combined those long-ago photos with a narrative he had written just at war's end to produce this rare illustrated guide to one G.I.'s wartime experiences.

Leff's book chiefly consists of a 77-page narrative of his ETO experiences up to February 1945, a second - largely photographic - 62-page section that covers his ETO time from March to May 1945 and a 45-page appendix that reproduces the daily Company E combat reports sent to Division HQ, therein supplementing Leff's foxhole-level observations with the 'big picture.' (The narrative only runs to February 1945 because he was discharged before he could complete the manuscript).

Leff's war wasn't one of endless heart-pounding advances and set-piece battles but rather of long periods of inactivity holding the line, breaks for behind-the-lines R&R followed by more marches, new positions, late-night patrols, etc. Casualties were mercifully few and often were victims of random shellfire, a chance encounter with a German MG position, etc. As with most dogfaces, much of Leff's time was spent digging in, trying to keep warm and so on. In that respect LENS OF AN INFANTRYMAN offers a valuable insight into the life of a typical line doggie in World War II.

The over 90 wartime photographs featured in the book reflect Leff's 'long periods of tedium pierced by moments of stark terror' existence. There are a number of shots of Company E personnel in action and behind the lines; American tanks, trucks and other equipment; civilians welcoming the Americans, GIs examining a dead German soldier, etc. Several sequences are quite striking - one showing a Sherman taking up a firing position only to be hit by a 88mm gun; Leff's squad seeking cover in a water-filled ditch as an MG opens up on them; etc.

Since the narrative was written just months after the events happened, LENS OF AN INFANTRYMAN has a rare freshness and emphasis on daily life missing from other accounts of G.I.s at war. The photos though elevate the book to a higher level, offering a rare perspective on the life of a combat infantryman. Murray Leff's book comes highly recommended.