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Capoeira: The History of an Afro-Brazilian Martial Art (Sport in the Global Society) epub download

by Matthias Röhrig Assunção


Sport, Education and Society. Matthias Röhrig Assunção studied history and Latin American Studies in Paris (Vincennes, Jussieu and Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Sport, Education and Society. Matthias Röhrig Assunção studied history and Latin American Studies in Paris (Vincennes, Jussieu and Sorbonne Nouvelle).

Capoeira: The History of an Afro-Brazilian Martial Art is a book by Matthias Röhrig Assunção published by Routledge in 2005. The book is known for its insight into the far-reaching history of the Brazilian martial art known as Capoeira, and its complex cultural significance to Brazilian identity

Capoeira: The History of Afro-Brazilian Martial Art explores Capoeira as a field of confrontation . Matthias Röhrig Assunção studied history and Latin American Studies in Paris (Vincennes, Jussieu and Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Matthias Röhrig Assunção studied history and Latin American Studies in Paris (Vincennes, Jussieu and Sorbonne Nouvelle).

techniques, whether training for a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu tournament or a Mixed Martial Arts fight . U N E S C O General History of Africa.

techniques, whether training for a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu tournament or a Mixed Martial Arts fight,. Africa under colonial domination, 1880-1935. 28 MB·25,552 Downloads·New! U N E S C O General History of Africa. Volume I. Methodology and African Prehistory. Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. 38 MB·8,697 Downloads·New!

Capoeira in the context of the Black Atlantic Об авторе (2004).

Capoeira in the context of the Black Atlantic. 32. Capoeiragem in Rio de Janeiro c 18001930. 70. Workers vagrants and tough guys in Bahia c 18601950.

Sport in the Global Society. New York: Routledge.

Capoeira: The History of an Afro-Brazilian Martial Art is a book by Matthias Röhrig Assunção published by Routledge in 2003. Sport in the Global Society.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Capoeira: The History of an Afro-Brazilian Martial Art (Sport in the Global Society). by. Matthias Rohrig Assuncao.

Capoeira, the Brazilian dance and martial art is now globalised and taught widely outside Brazil

Capoeira, the Brazilian dance and martial art is now globalised and taught widely outside Brazil. Instruction is provided by Brazilians who are living in self-imposed exile from their homeland. The authentic capoeira that such teachers provide is a major attraction for non-Brazilian students.

Capoeira: The History of Afro-Brazilian Martial Art (Sport in the Global Society, 45). Matthi Assuncao. Download (pdf, 1. 0 Mb) Donate Read.

Originally the preserve of Afro-Brazilian slaves, the marginalized and the underclasses in Brazilian society, capoeira is now a mainstream sport, taught in Brazilian schools and practised by a range of social classes around the world. Some advocates now seek Olympic recognition for Capoeira. This apparent change in the meaning and purpose of Capeoira has led to conflicts between traditionalists, who view capoeira as their heritage descended from the maroons, a weapon to be used against the injustice and repression; and reformers, who wish to see Capoeira develop as an international sport. Capoeira: The History of Afro-Brazilian Martial Art explores Capoeira as a field of confrontation where the different struggles that divide Brazilian society are played out. It contains both the first comprehensive English language review of archive and contemporary literature relating to Capoeira, as well as the first scholarly account of Capoeira's history and development.

Capoeira: The History of an Afro-Brazilian Martial Art (Sport in the Global Society) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0714680866

ISBN: 0714680869

Author: Matthias Röhrig Assunção

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Performing Arts

Language: English

Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (October 3, 2002)

Pages: 284 pages

ePUB size: 1672 kb

FB2 size: 1604 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 864

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Related to Capoeira: The History of an Afro-Brazilian Martial Art (Sport in the Global Society) ePub books

Kelezel
This volume by Assuncao is truly a scholarly work that would be difficult, indeed tedious, for the typical layperson. However, if you really want to see opposing opinions, substantiated research, and great attention to detail, this is the martial arts (cultural) history text for you. I definitely disagree with some of the authors conclusions but that's OK. He seems to disagree with himself in places also (or at least leave some inquiries open to the reader to resolve.
Kelezel
This volume by Assuncao is truly a scholarly work that would be difficult, indeed tedious, for the typical layperson. However, if you really want to see opposing opinions, substantiated research, and great attention to detail, this is the martial arts (cultural) history text for you. I definitely disagree with some of the authors conclusions but that's OK. He seems to disagree with himself in places also (or at least leave some inquiries open to the reader to resolve.
Roram
Matthias Röhrig Assunção draws on historical fact to propose a view of Capoeira's development as a martial art. Through research, and much like many of us, through objective interpretation he ascertains what is reality, and what is fiction. Furthermore, he relates the common myths surrounding Capoeira to the people who need them, and proposes that at times myths are exactly what inspires individuals. He is, however, an advocate of fact, truth, and reality; and this shows in his work.

The book is by far the most in depth work on Capoeira written in English to date. (To the best of my knowledge) It's perspective is born of inquisition rather then the "gospel truth" word of mouth tradition so common in Capoeira circles.

Bravo !!! I am sincerely touched now that this book has been published, for I myself have been attempting various essays regarding some of the topics explored here. I am glad that the perspective came from a source so well educated, and through such a large spectrum of information. I have received educated reason to back many opinions I have had to date.

Salve,

Instrutor LoboGuara (Associacao Cordao de Contas do Canada)

Paul Bielak and David M. Cvet
Roram
Matthias Röhrig Assunção draws on historical fact to propose a view of Capoeira's development as a martial art. Through research, and much like many of us, through objective interpretation he ascertains what is reality, and what is fiction. Furthermore, he relates the common myths surrounding Capoeira to the people who need them, and proposes that at times myths are exactly what inspires individuals. He is, however, an advocate of fact, truth, and reality; and this shows in his work.

The book is by far the most in depth work on Capoeira written in English to date. (To the best of my knowledge) It's perspective is born of inquisition rather then the "gospel truth" word of mouth tradition so common in Capoeira circles.

Bravo !!! I am sincerely touched now that this book has been published, for I myself have been attempting various essays regarding some of the topics explored here. I am glad that the perspective came from a source so well educated, and through such a large spectrum of information. I have received educated reason to back many opinions I have had to date.

Salve,

Instrutor LoboGuara (Associacao Cordao de Contas do Canada)

Paul Bielak and David M. Cvet
Dynen
Very comprehensive review of the history of capoeira. The book's strong point is its thoroughness in covering the cultural/social/political contexts in which capoeira developed in different parts of Brazil. I must disagree w/ the reviewer Dr. Ifatunmibi's point that the author is, "only using written accounts of Capoeira to validate his views." I found that the author was meticulous in his references to the many oral historical accounts of capoeira, and cites his own oral interviews w/ Mestres, etc. that he completed in conducting his primary research. And despite the fact that the author does draw some conclusions from his research, I do believe he presents a fairly balanced view of the written/oral documentation of the antecedents of Capoeira and the broad spectrum of opinion, from whether Capoeira is a purely African art form transported intact to Brazil, or is a purely Brazilian art form. The book has a few weak points: it needs a good proofreading - I found many typos, items missing from the index, sentences that are difficult to understand and words that seem out of place. Also the way the text is organized leads to some chronological "jumping around" that's sometimes difficult to follow, and to some redundancies.
Dynen
Very comprehensive review of the history of capoeira. The book's strong point is its thoroughness in covering the cultural/social/political contexts in which capoeira developed in different parts of Brazil. I must disagree w/ the reviewer Dr. Ifatunmibi's point that the author is, "only using written accounts of Capoeira to validate his views." I found that the author was meticulous in his references to the many oral historical accounts of capoeira, and cites his own oral interviews w/ Mestres, etc. that he completed in conducting his primary research. And despite the fact that the author does draw some conclusions from his research, I do believe he presents a fairly balanced view of the written/oral documentation of the antecedents of Capoeira and the broad spectrum of opinion, from whether Capoeira is a purely African art form transported intact to Brazil, or is a purely Brazilian art form. The book has a few weak points: it needs a good proofreading - I found many typos, items missing from the index, sentences that are difficult to understand and words that seem out of place. Also the way the text is organized leads to some chronological "jumping around" that's sometimes difficult to follow, and to some redundancies.
Todal
I've been reading martial art books for the past sixteen years, and this has to be one of the best. As a practitioner and an academic I have to say this is a welcome addition to any martial arts library whether or not you practice capoeira. This is an extremely well researched, well-footnoted book by a professional historian who has the requisite language and archival skills needed to do justice to the topic. It also traces the historiography of the art, i.e. it critically and convincingly addresses what other scholars have written about capoeira in English and Portuguese.
The price is an issue, and it is well known that books published by Routledge are outrageously expensive (which is why many authors try to publish elsewhere). But if you are serious about capoeira, or need to know how martial art books should be written, then spend the 50$. Although 224 pages doesn't sound like much, this is a book packed with information that has serious implications for thinking about how capoeira history has been appropriated as a political activity. For instructors of capoeira I would advise them to buy this book before they say anything more to their students about capoeira history.
Todal
I've been reading martial art books for the past sixteen years, and this has to be one of the best. As a practitioner and an academic I have to say this is a welcome addition to any martial arts library whether or not you practice capoeira. This is an extremely well researched, well-footnoted book by a professional historian who has the requisite language and archival skills needed to do justice to the topic. It also traces the historiography of the art, i.e. it critically and convincingly addresses what other scholars have written about capoeira in English and Portuguese.
The price is an issue, and it is well known that books published by Routledge are outrageously expensive (which is why many authors try to publish elsewhere). But if you are serious about capoeira, or need to know how martial art books should be written, then spend the 50$. Although 224 pages doesn't sound like much, this is a book packed with information that has serious implications for thinking about how capoeira history has been appropriated as a political activity. For instructors of capoeira I would advise them to buy this book before they say anything more to their students about capoeira history.
Tegore
The problem with this book is that He is only using written accounts of Capoeira to validate his views. Many other reviewers mistakenly regard this as "scholarly". It down plays any other perspective about the history, origin, or practice of Capoeira as "questionable" because it was not written about at a certain time.

The problem with this attitude is that it leaves Capoeira's definition in the hands of the white slave owners of Brasil who were writing about it. It neglects the fact that just because someone did not write about something it did not happen. Capoeira's origins, as the author acknowledges is from Angola. These people were followers of oral learning not written learning. It is elitist to suggest that the writing (especially when written by outsiders who were also bias slave holders) is more valuable than the oral traditions.

Capoeira is African. And most of Africa is oral in traditions of learning and recording...thus it is only fair to acknowlege these oral legacies over the outsiders written response to a martial art he did not understand or respect.
Tegore
The problem with this book is that He is only using written accounts of Capoeira to validate his views. Many other reviewers mistakenly regard this as "scholarly". It down plays any other perspective about the history, origin, or practice of Capoeira as "questionable" because it was not written about at a certain time.

The problem with this attitude is that it leaves Capoeira's definition in the hands of the white slave owners of Brasil who were writing about it. It neglects the fact that just because someone did not write about something it did not happen. Capoeira's origins, as the author acknowledges is from Angola. These people were followers of oral learning not written learning. It is elitist to suggest that the writing (especially when written by outsiders who were also bias slave holders) is more valuable than the oral traditions.

Capoeira is African. And most of Africa is oral in traditions of learning and recording...thus it is only fair to acknowlege these oral legacies over the outsiders written response to a martial art he did not understand or respect.