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Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema epub download

by David Bordwell


Poetics of Cinema by David Bordwell. This has led me to examine national cinema traditions (in my work on Dreyer, Ozu, and Eisenstein) as well as technological and production conditions (in The Classical Hollywood Cinema and The Way Hollywood Tells It).

Poetics of Cinema by David Bordwell. 512 pages, 7 10 inches. I’ve also posited some historical continuities that are transnational, such as the tradition of depth staging (in On the History of Film Style and Figures Traced in Light).

David Bordwell has divided this thorough introduction to Ozu's life and work into two sections. Yasujiro Ozu (1903-63) was one of the masters of modern Japanese cinema, yet his work is hardly known to most Western filmgoers

David Bordwell has divided this thorough introduction to Ozu's life and work into two sections. The first offers a theory of themes, ideas, and obsessions that run through Ozu's large body of films. The second treats each of Ozu's movies in turn, closely examining their individual particularities. Ozu's films are quiet and methodically paced, but richly rewarding and deeply moving. Rent any one or two of them and then settle down with this book. Yasujiro Ozu (1903-63) was one of the masters of modern Japanese cinema, yet his work is hardly known to most Western filmgoers. His spare studies of family life don't "translate" well for audiences used to the melodrama of Terms of Endearment.

It's a shame that David Borwell's Ozu And The Poetics Of Cinema (1988) is out-of-print, since it is the definitive book in English on Japanese . Bordwell discusses their criticism and makes observations and judgements as well.

It's a shame that David Borwell's Ozu And The Poetics Of Cinema (1988) is out-of-print, since it is the definitive book in English on Japanese master director Yasujiro Ozu. Donald Richie's book, Ozu: His Life and Films, is also indispensable, but it only focuses on the late films of Ozu. Bordwell has studied all surviving films and therefore has a greater overall analysis of the complete career of Oz.

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David Bordwell, Jacques Ledoux Professor at the University of Wisconsin, is arguably the most influential scholar of film in the United States

David Bordwell, Jacques Ledoux Professor at the University of Wisconsin, is arguably the most influential scholar of film in the United States. The author, with his wife Kristin Thompson, of the standard textbook Film Art and a series of influential studies of directors (Eisenstein, Ozu, Dreyer) as well as periods and styles (Hong Kong cinema, Classical Hollywood cinema, among others), he has also trained a generation of professors of cinema studies, extending his influence throughout the world.

London, Princeton, . British Film Institute, Princeton University Press, 1988. Subject terms: Ozu, Yasujirō, - 1903-1963 - Criticism and interpretation. Motion pictures - Aesthetics.

Find sources: "David Bordwell" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR . Bordwell, David (1988). Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Find sources: "David Bordwell" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (April 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Bordwell lecturing on the economics of the film industry; his whiteboard diagram shows the oligopoly that existed in the US film industry during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Bordwell spent nearly the entirety of his career as a professor of film at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he is currently the Jacques Ledoux Professor of Film Studies, Emeritus in the Department of Communication Arts.

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Subject: Ozu, Yasujirō, 1903-1963 - Criticism and interpretation. Subject: Motion pictures - Aesthetics.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 5. 1 Mb. The Films of Carl-Theodor Dreyer (With Photos).

Over the last two decades, Yasujiro Ozu has won international recognition as a major filmmaker. Combining biographical information with discussions of the films' aesthetic strategies and cultural significance, David Bordwell questions the popular image of Ozu as the traditional Japanese artisan and examines the aesthetic nature and functions of his cinema.

Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema epub download

ISBN13: 978-0691008226

ISBN: 0691008221

Author: David Bordwell

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Performing Arts

Language: English

Publisher: Princeton University Press; Second Printing (1994) edition (August 1, 1988)

Pages: 384 pages

ePUB size: 1791 kb

FB2 size: 1490 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 240

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Related to Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema ePub books

Livina
Bordwell's book is without peer on the film craft of Ozu yet in English. It surpasses all other books about Ozu. It is unfortunate that this Bordwell title is difficult to gain. I don't own it, it's too expensive, so I've had to glean its contents other ways.

If you don't believe my critique of the book, just listen to the commentary by Bordwell on the DVD of Ozu's "Autumn Afternoon" film. It is brilliant, speaking of true structural aspects, visual composition, etc. Bordwell is a fine film scholar.

Please publishers, issue this book in an affordable format!
Livina
Bordwell's book is without peer on the film craft of Ozu yet in English. It surpasses all other books about Ozu. It is unfortunate that this Bordwell title is difficult to gain. I don't own it, it's too expensive, so I've had to glean its contents other ways.

If you don't believe my critique of the book, just listen to the commentary by Bordwell on the DVD of Ozu's "Autumn Afternoon" film. It is brilliant, speaking of true structural aspects, visual composition, etc. Bordwell is a fine film scholar.

Please publishers, issue this book in an affordable format!
Zainn
David Bordwell's extraordinarily detailed and painstaking analysis of the entire oevre of Ozu Yasujiro is one of the best studies of Japanese cinema written in English language. Bordwell does a brillian t job of demolishing the mythical image of Ozu as the "most (traditional) Japanese filmmaker," illustrating through numerous case studies that Ozu, rather than challenging the Western norms of narrative strageties in the manner of a Zen master , developed his own stylistics which is rigorous, refined and distinctively "modern." By no means the last word on Ozu scholarship, the book is nonetheless highly recommended to any serious student of Japanese cinema.
Zainn
David Bordwell's extraordinarily detailed and painstaking analysis of the entire oevre of Ozu Yasujiro is one of the best studies of Japanese cinema written in English language. Bordwell does a brillian t job of demolishing the mythical image of Ozu as the "most (traditional) Japanese filmmaker," illustrating through numerous case studies that Ozu, rather than challenging the Western norms of narrative strageties in the manner of a Zen master , developed his own stylistics which is rigorous, refined and distinctively "modern." By no means the last word on Ozu scholarship, the book is nonetheless highly recommended to any serious student of Japanese cinema.
virus
Bordwell's extremely well-researched book on Ozu covers all of the great director's existing works from the earliest silent films on - unlike Donald Richie's book, which tends to pay scant attention to the silent pictures. Bordwell does challenge the notion of Ozu as a "traditional" director (Richie tends to reinforce it) and instead makes the argument that Ozu was a formal pioneer - as he was. The problem with Bordwell and many other "serious" film critics is that they get so wrapped up in technique that technique becomes the only measuring post - which is why formally innovative but otherwise shallow directors like Orson Welles continue to be considered the best directors in history. Ozu combined cutting-edge technique with beautiful, quiet, often profound insights into Japanese society and human nature but Bordwell, like a scientist dissecting a frog, can tell you about all the parts but not what truly animates the thing. Ozu always called himself a formalist and his attention to formal details was meticulous and precise, but it was the real poetry of his films that caused Wenders to cite Ozu as "a sacred treasure of the cinema" and seperates Ozu's films from emptyheaded formalist garbage like "Last Year at Marienbad" or Welles' endlessly awful "Touch of Evil." Bordwell's dry analysis of technique borders on the obsessive and really [stink] the joy out of each film, even Ozu's extent pure dumb fun silent "B" pics like "Dragnet Girl." Mr. Bordwell's effort and his attention to detail should be cheered; some of the points he makes and the patterns he discovers are truly astonishing and enlightening. But ultimately, though, I would say that neither this book nor Richie's really seem able to nail Ozu down. Perhaps that's merely a testament to Ozu's enduring genius.
virus
Bordwell's extremely well-researched book on Ozu covers all of the great director's existing works from the earliest silent films on - unlike Donald Richie's book, which tends to pay scant attention to the silent pictures. Bordwell does challenge the notion of Ozu as a "traditional" director (Richie tends to reinforce it) and instead makes the argument that Ozu was a formal pioneer - as he was. The problem with Bordwell and many other "serious" film critics is that they get so wrapped up in technique that technique becomes the only measuring post - which is why formally innovative but otherwise shallow directors like Orson Welles continue to be considered the best directors in history. Ozu combined cutting-edge technique with beautiful, quiet, often profound insights into Japanese society and human nature but Bordwell, like a scientist dissecting a frog, can tell you about all the parts but not what truly animates the thing. Ozu always called himself a formalist and his attention to formal details was meticulous and precise, but it was the real poetry of his films that caused Wenders to cite Ozu as "a sacred treasure of the cinema" and seperates Ozu's films from emptyheaded formalist garbage like "Last Year at Marienbad" or Welles' endlessly awful "Touch of Evil." Bordwell's dry analysis of technique borders on the obsessive and really [stink] the joy out of each film, even Ozu's extent pure dumb fun silent "B" pics like "Dragnet Girl." Mr. Bordwell's effort and his attention to detail should be cheered; some of the points he makes and the patterns he discovers are truly astonishing and enlightening. But ultimately, though, I would say that neither this book nor Richie's really seem able to nail Ozu down. Perhaps that's merely a testament to Ozu's enduring genius.
luisRED
I have had a couple classes with David Bordwell and I noticed that what you sighted as weaknesses is his approach. He sets out to analyze the films exactly as you have mentioned. So maybe you need to write a book on Ozu that suits your angle.

I also think your comments on Welles and "Last Year at Marienbad" are a bit empty themselves. They seem to be more in line with opinion rather than astute rebuttal of a given piece of analysis. For instance, your comment "...from emptyheaded formalist garbage like "Last Year at Marienbad" or Welles' endlessly awful "Touch of Evil."; what makes these films empty-headed and formalist garbage? What is your definition of "empty-headed"? What is your definition of "formalist garbage"? One can state negative comments but to dissect the "why" in your comments is key, in my opinion, to delve into serious criticism. You sound like you like certain films (in my opinion you seem to like films that tread closer to realism such as "Yi-Yi", which you reviewed and gave five stars) and you do not like other films (such as "Touch of Evil" and "Last Year at Marienbad" which seem to be set in unrealistic realms). I think that sums up every film-goer. I do appreciate your comments though.
luisRED
I have had a couple classes with David Bordwell and I noticed that what you sighted as weaknesses is his approach. He sets out to analyze the films exactly as you have mentioned. So maybe you need to write a book on Ozu that suits your angle.

I also think your comments on Welles and "Last Year at Marienbad" are a bit empty themselves. They seem to be more in line with opinion rather than astute rebuttal of a given piece of analysis. For instance, your comment "...from emptyheaded formalist garbage like "Last Year at Marienbad" or Welles' endlessly awful "Touch of Evil."; what makes these films empty-headed and formalist garbage? What is your definition of "empty-headed"? What is your definition of "formalist garbage"? One can state negative comments but to dissect the "why" in your comments is key, in my opinion, to delve into serious criticism. You sound like you like certain films (in my opinion you seem to like films that tread closer to realism such as "Yi-Yi", which you reviewed and gave five stars) and you do not like other films (such as "Touch of Evil" and "Last Year at Marienbad" which seem to be set in unrealistic realms). I think that sums up every film-goer. I do appreciate your comments though.