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The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960 epub download

by Janet Staiger,David Bordwell


Acclaimed for their breakthrough approach, Bordwell, Staiger and Thompson analyze the basic conditions of American film-making as a historical institution and consider to what extent Hollywood film production constitutes a systematic enterprise, in both its style and its business.

Acclaimed for their breakthrough approach, Bordwell, Staiger and Thompson analyze the basic conditions of American film-making as a historical institution and consider to what extent Hollywood film production constitutes a systematic enterprise, in both its style and its business operations.

David Bordwell (Author), Janet Staiger (Author) . By clarifying exactly what the Hollywood style is, this book has changed some of the ways I watch cinema. Bordwell and his colleagues show how economic, technical and cultural factors joined to create what they call the classical Hollywood movie. They define that form as emphasizing continuity of character, time and location, all tied together by cause and effect. Deeper awareness of the classical model has not only allowed me to more critically watch Hollywood movies, but has also led me to distinguish how art movies, European movies, and experimental movies differ from the Hollywood model.

Staiger, Janet; Thompson, Kristin, 1950-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library.

The Classical Hollywood Cinema book. A useful survey of Hollywood film production up to 1960, considering style, organizational modes of production, and technology, including the effects of technology on style. Occasionally, the writing on style can be pompous and pseudo-intellectual, finding academic-sounding words when simple words would do.

Staiger broke ground in film studies with her early articles and then co-authorship of The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960 (1985, with David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson). Applying Marxist materialist historiography and economic theory to the Hollywood film industry, she organized well-known and also unexplored facts into a coherent explanation of why this worldwide dominant industry operates as it does.

Classical Hollywood Cinema by David Bordwell New Paperback BookPaperback: 652 pages. Set apart by its combination of theoretical analysis and empirical evidence, this book is the standard work on the classical Hollywood cinema style of film-making from the silent era to the 1960s. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 3 brand new listings. The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960 by Kristin Thompson, Janet Staiger, David Bordwell (Paperback, 1988). Brand new: lowest price.

amp; Thompson, Kristin. London : Routledge & Kegan Paul. and Thompson, Kristin. The classical Hollywood cinema : film style & mode of production to 1960. The classical Hollywood cinema : film style & mode of production to 1960, David Bordwell, Janet Staiger and Kristin Thompson Routledge & Kegan Paul London 1985. Australian/Harvard Citation. amp; Thompson, Kristin.

THE CLASSICAL HOLLYWOOD CINEMA Film Style & Mode of Production to 1960 David Bordwell, Janet Staiger and . He would include, as well, the influence of other signifying practices besides the medium of film.

THE CLASSICAL HOLLYWOOD CINEMA Film Style & Mode of Production to 1960 David Bordwell, Janet Staiger and Kristin Thompson (výběr) Part Two The Hollywood mode of production to 1930 JANET STAIGER Page 87 8 The Hollywood mode of production: its conditions of existence Introduction The making of a when it is a film-can sometimes fascinate us as much.

Required texts: The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960, by David Bordwell, Janet Staiger, Kristin Thompson (ISBN: 0-231-06055-6). 12: The Hollywood Mode of Production Reading: The Classical Hollywood Cinema, pp. 87-112 14: 19: Reading: American Cinema and Hollywood ( Hollywood as Industry ), pp. 19-28 21: 26: Reading: Classical Hollywood Cinema, pp. 113-153 28: October 3: 5: Reading: American Cinema and Hollywood ( Early American Film ), pp. 29-45 10: Documentary film screening: American Cinema: The Studio.

The relations between film style and mode of production are, according to the authors, reciprocal and .

The relations between film style and mode of production are, according to the authors, reciprocal and mutually influencing.

The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960 epub download

ISBN13: 978-0710097248

ISBN: 0710097247

Author: Janet Staiger,David Bordwell

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Performing Arts

Language: English

Publisher: Routledge; First Edition edition (May 1985)

Pages: 640 pages

ePUB size: 1712 kb

FB2 size: 1519 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 727

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Related to The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960 ePub books

Agagamand
It’s a surprise to find that a textbook more than thirty years old is not only still relevant, but also a pleasure to read.

Bordwell and his colleagues show how economic, technical and cultural factors joined to create what they call the classical Hollywood movie. They define that form as emphasizing continuity of character, time and location, all tied together by cause and effect. The Hollywood movie hews close to the Aristotelian dictum that nothing should be in the presentation that does not further the narrative. (The reference to the philosopher is mine, not the authors.) The book is beautifully written with logically and clearly developed analyses to show how the authors reached their conclusions
.
To insure that they were not just taking the “big” movies as indicative of the Hollywood style, the authors almost randomly selected 100 movies from a list of almost 30,000 made between 1915 and 1960. (I say almost because certain movies were excluded either because they were not made in the United States or because prints were not available.) At first I was skeptical of using this kind of statistical method, but I soon relented. The authors were able to show the similarities between below “B” movies and what we now call blockbusters.

I was a bit disappointed at first that the period covered ended in 1960 before the advent of steadicams, Dolby sound and non-linear editors. Yet the discussion of how the introduction of tungsten lighting, sound and new screen ratios changed the Hollywood movie while the basic form still survived made it easy to infer how these later developments changed movies while enabling the same movies to keep to the classical form.

The book deals not just with technical change but also with phenomenon that effected movie aesthetics like the move from the studio system to the independent producer system, the union structure of the work force, and even a publication like “American Cinematographer” (The magazine of the American Society of Cinematographers).

The book has two sections of smallish black and white illustrations. I recommend a second bookmark at these images to ease flipping back and forth.

Many students of cinema have heard how Gregg Toland used deep focus to create the look and art of Citizen Kane, yet the authors call attention to the fact that other cinematographers of the time were using deep focus; that Toland was criticized by his peers for the fancy camera work; and that in later years Toland moved away from the more extreme forms of the technique.

By clarifying exactly what the Hollywood style is, this book has changed some of the ways I watch cinema. Deeper awareness of the classical model has not only allowed me to more critically watch Hollywood movies, but has also led me to distinguish how art movies, European movies, and experimental movies differ from the Hollywood model.
Agagamand
It’s a surprise to find that a textbook more than thirty years old is not only still relevant, but also a pleasure to read.

Bordwell and his colleagues show how economic, technical and cultural factors joined to create what they call the classical Hollywood movie. They define that form as emphasizing continuity of character, time and location, all tied together by cause and effect. The Hollywood movie hews close to the Aristotelian dictum that nothing should be in the presentation that does not further the narrative. (The reference to the philosopher is mine, not the authors.) The book is beautifully written with logically and clearly developed analyses to show how the authors reached their conclusions
.
To insure that they were not just taking the “big” movies as indicative of the Hollywood style, the authors almost randomly selected 100 movies from a list of almost 30,000 made between 1915 and 1960. (I say almost because certain movies were excluded either because they were not made in the United States or because prints were not available.) At first I was skeptical of using this kind of statistical method, but I soon relented. The authors were able to show the similarities between below “B” movies and what we now call blockbusters.

I was a bit disappointed at first that the period covered ended in 1960 before the advent of steadicams, Dolby sound and non-linear editors. Yet the discussion of how the introduction of tungsten lighting, sound and new screen ratios changed the Hollywood movie while the basic form still survived made it easy to infer how these later developments changed movies while enabling the same movies to keep to the classical form.

The book deals not just with technical change but also with phenomenon that effected movie aesthetics like the move from the studio system to the independent producer system, the union structure of the work force, and even a publication like “American Cinematographer” (The magazine of the American Society of Cinematographers).

The book has two sections of smallish black and white illustrations. I recommend a second bookmark at these images to ease flipping back and forth.

Many students of cinema have heard how Gregg Toland used deep focus to create the look and art of Citizen Kane, yet the authors call attention to the fact that other cinematographers of the time were using deep focus; that Toland was criticized by his peers for the fancy camera work; and that in later years Toland moved away from the more extreme forms of the technique.

By clarifying exactly what the Hollywood style is, this book has changed some of the ways I watch cinema. Deeper awareness of the classical model has not only allowed me to more critically watch Hollywood movies, but has also led me to distinguish how art movies, European movies, and experimental movies differ from the Hollywood model.
Mr_Mix
If you love classic cinema you will enjoy this text. Great images and information on the origins of cinema through the end of the Golden Age.
Mr_Mix
If you love classic cinema you will enjoy this text. Great images and information on the origins of cinema through the end of the Golden Age.
Spilberg
Got this book for a film class I was taking in college. It provided me with what I needed, at the best price online.
Spilberg
Got this book for a film class I was taking in college. It provided me with what I needed, at the best price online.
Kefym
I love old movies. They have some kind of magic that sadly I can't find in movies today. What this book does is to study the classical years- The classical narrative and how the system, style and people made together these classical movies. The starting point of this book is that almost all of the movies from 1917 to 1960 have the same elements, the same style- the style that today we all referring to when we think of hollywood- the way the story goes, the technical making (filming, editing) that tries to stay unseen and more. The authors choose 100 films from these years,almost all of them are not famous ones or films that made special impact, but films that were made out of the system. Out of these films they show the reader how the hollywood style make us blind to the technical elements and to the similarity of them- because although the norms changed all the time by films that broke the old norms- they all have similar basis. This book is very interesting and I recommend it to everyone who wants to learn more about classical hollywood from the films themselves. The only complaint I have (and it's refering to the edition I read, which is from 1985)) is that the pages are divided to columns and it makes the reading a little uneasy, but still worth the reading.
Kefym
I love old movies. They have some kind of magic that sadly I can't find in movies today. What this book does is to study the classical years- The classical narrative and how the system, style and people made together these classical movies. The starting point of this book is that almost all of the movies from 1917 to 1960 have the same elements, the same style- the style that today we all referring to when we think of hollywood- the way the story goes, the technical making (filming, editing) that tries to stay unseen and more. The authors choose 100 films from these years,almost all of them are not famous ones or films that made special impact, but films that were made out of the system. Out of these films they show the reader how the hollywood style make us blind to the technical elements and to the similarity of them- because although the norms changed all the time by films that broke the old norms- they all have similar basis. This book is very interesting and I recommend it to everyone who wants to learn more about classical hollywood from the films themselves. The only complaint I have (and it's refering to the edition I read, which is from 1985)) is that the pages are divided to columns and it makes the reading a little uneasy, but still worth the reading.
Kann
Probably the only book of this sort; ambitious as it is informative, well written and wide in the scope of research; a true classic in the field of cinema history...
Obligatory reading for all who want to understand, study or write about American cinema; BOTH classical and contemporary, the book is also useful to other students of cinema...
Kann
Probably the only book of this sort; ambitious as it is informative, well written and wide in the scope of research; a true classic in the field of cinema history...
Obligatory reading for all who want to understand, study or write about American cinema; BOTH classical and contemporary, the book is also useful to other students of cinema...
Zainian
This is the quintessential history of Hollywood at its peak.
Zainian
This is the quintessential history of Hollywood at its peak.