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Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968-2010 epub download

by Greil Marcus


He subsequently published Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968–2010 (2010) and The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years (2011).

He subsequently published Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968–2010 (2010) and The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years (2011). Double Feature: Movies & Politics (1972), co-author with Michael Goodwin.

Interesting book on Dylan and Greg Marcus's take on the artist. If you're a Dylan fan this is a must. Much of the analysis is so self-aggrandizing, that it seemingly undermines Dylan's genius as a songwriter.

Bob Dylan: Writings 1968-2010. The book begins in Berkeley in 1968, and ends with a piece on Dylan’s show at the University of Minnesota-his very first appearance at his alma mater-on election night 2008

The book begins in Berkeley in 1968, and ends with a piece on Dylan's show at the University of Minnesota-his very first appearance at his alma mater-on election night 2008. In between are moments of euphoric discovery: From Marcus's liner notes for the 1967 Basement Tapes (pop music's most famous bootlegged archives) to his exploration of Dylan's reimagining of the American experience in the 1997 Time Out of Mind.

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Rolling Stone, October, 2010 "As a critic, Greil Marcus is a tough crowd-his bullshit detector should get some kind . Book Page, December 2010 "No one else has anatomized Bob Dylan, his music and his personality as relentlessly or as minutely as Greil Marcus

Rolling Stone, October, 2010 "As a critic, Greil Marcus is a tough crowd-his bullshit detector should get some kind of Nobel Prize. No writer has followed Bob Dylan as closely or as passionately as Marcus, who makes the man's whole career seem like one wild American adventure. Book Page, December 2010 "No one else has anatomized Bob Dylan, his music and his personality as relentlessly or as minutely as Greil Marcus. Witness now the culmination of that obsession in Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus â?Š. But this is more than a study of Dylan-it's a jagged portrait of the ag.

Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings, 1968–2010 (2010). Published with assistance from the foundation established in memory of Amasa Stone Mather of the Class of 1907, Yale College. The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years (2011). The History of Rock ’n’ Roll in Ten Songs (2014). This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the .

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968-2010. The book begins in Berkeley in 1968, and ends with a piece on Dylan's show at the University of Minnesota-his very first appearance at his alma mater-on election night 2008.

In Marcus's early championing of Dylan, his writing was marred by schoolboy taunts about rival rockers. Marcus sets Dylan in the dark musical tradition he delineated in Mystery Train. Discussing a performance in 1974, he wrote, "Any comparison between and an earnest, talented group like the Allman Brothers Band would be a joke. This was rock'n'roll at its limits. a dervish possessed by a god you don't want to meet.

The book begins in Berkeley in 1968, and ends with a piece on Dylan's show at the University of Minnesota—his very first appearance at his alma mater—on election night 2008. In between are moments of euphoric discovery: From Marcus's liner notes for the 1967 Basement Tapes (pop music's most famous bootlegged archives) to his exploration of Dylan's reimagining of the American experience in the 1997 Time Out of Mind. And rejection; Marcus's Rolling Stone piece on Dylan's album Self Portrait—often called the most famous record review ever written—began with “What is this shit?” and led to his departure from the magazine for five years. Marcus follows not only recordings but performances, books, movies, and all manner of highways and byways in which Bob Dylan has made himself felt in our culture.

Together the dozens of pieces collected here comprise a portrait of how, throughout his career, Bob Dylan has drawn upon and reinvented the landscape of traditional American song, its myths and choruses, heroes and villains. They are the result of a more than forty-year engagement between an unparalleled singer and a uniquely acute listener.

Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968-2010 epub download

ISBN13: 978-1586488314

ISBN: 1586488317

Author: Greil Marcus

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Music

Language: English

Publisher: PublicAffairs; First Edition edition (October 19, 2010)

Pages: 512 pages

ePUB size: 1196 kb

FB2 size: 1480 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 423

Other Formats: rtf lit docx mobi

Related to Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968-2010 ePub books

fabscf
Marcus is one of the most acute rock music commentators, and he is by turns revealing and scathing about Dylan. This is a useful tool to help evaluate Dylan's later work as well as one to contextualize it adequately. This prompted me to listen again to some of the American folk music which so influenced and still influences Dylan.
fabscf
Marcus is one of the most acute rock music commentators, and he is by turns revealing and scathing about Dylan. This is a useful tool to help evaluate Dylan's later work as well as one to contextualize it adequately. This prompted me to listen again to some of the American folk music which so influenced and still influences Dylan.
Goll
Great compliation from one of the greatest rock critics ever. The first half of the book is a complete delight, but it tends to get a little bit more babblier on the second half, specially with a couple of articles that are interesting enough, but only slightly touch on the subject of Dylan. Overall a great book, a great read and great insight to one of the hardest subject matters in modern music.
Goll
Great compliation from one of the greatest rock critics ever. The first half of the book is a complete delight, but it tends to get a little bit more babblier on the second half, specially with a couple of articles that are interesting enough, but only slightly touch on the subject of Dylan. Overall a great book, a great read and great insight to one of the hardest subject matters in modern music.
Coidor
As a music critic myself and an archivist of popular culture (I founded the All-Music Guide allmusic.com and a number of other sites as well), I was curious to see what this book contained. Also, I traveled some with Bob Dylan and another player named Perry Lederman back in 1961. If Dylan and I were still in touch, we would agree that Lederman was perhaps the most marvelous Travis-style guitar picker we had ever encountered, at least back then. I hitchhiked with Dylan, helped him to find his way around Ann Arbor (my home town) for an early concert, and so on. My point is: I know something about both Dylan and his music. I have published many books on music, my most recent book (August 2010) being "Blues in Black and White: The Landmark Ann Arbor Blues Festivals," so I know at least a little about that as well.

Marcus writes with passion, devotion, care, and great, great detail about Dylan's music. My problem with the book and the writing is best expressed by a quote from William Blake in his poem "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell," which is "Enough! or too much." In this case, I would say "too much!" and a lot of this writing tells me not so much about Dylan, as about Marcus.

What little I do know about Dylan, I doubt that he would appreciate most of what this book has to say about his motives and state of mind. I feel the same way. That being said, I don't want to sound too negative either. What I do appreciate is the degree of (as mentioned earlier) "passion, devotion, care, and great, great detail" that Marcus puts into his writing, especially about the music scene back then. However, when it comes to speculating about Dylan, his guess is as good as mine, as in: a guess. I would rather read something that this author writes about himself, his life, his spirituality, etc., because I like the writing. He writes beautifully. I just might prefer a subject he knows more about from a personal standpoint. Only Dylan himself could write the kind of material Marcus writes here about Dylan and get my interest.

I am sure this will not be a popular post, but then I am a music critic too! What do you expect?
Coidor
As a music critic myself and an archivist of popular culture (I founded the All-Music Guide allmusic.com and a number of other sites as well), I was curious to see what this book contained. Also, I traveled some with Bob Dylan and another player named Perry Lederman back in 1961. If Dylan and I were still in touch, we would agree that Lederman was perhaps the most marvelous Travis-style guitar picker we had ever encountered, at least back then. I hitchhiked with Dylan, helped him to find his way around Ann Arbor (my home town) for an early concert, and so on. My point is: I know something about both Dylan and his music. I have published many books on music, my most recent book (August 2010) being "Blues in Black and White: The Landmark Ann Arbor Blues Festivals," so I know at least a little about that as well.

Marcus writes with passion, devotion, care, and great, great detail about Dylan's music. My problem with the book and the writing is best expressed by a quote from William Blake in his poem "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell," which is "Enough! or too much." In this case, I would say "too much!" and a lot of this writing tells me not so much about Dylan, as about Marcus.

What little I do know about Dylan, I doubt that he would appreciate most of what this book has to say about his motives and state of mind. I feel the same way. That being said, I don't want to sound too negative either. What I do appreciate is the degree of (as mentioned earlier) "passion, devotion, care, and great, great detail" that Marcus puts into his writing, especially about the music scene back then. However, when it comes to speculating about Dylan, his guess is as good as mine, as in: a guess. I would rather read something that this author writes about himself, his life, his spirituality, etc., because I like the writing. He writes beautifully. I just might prefer a subject he knows more about from a personal standpoint. Only Dylan himself could write the kind of material Marcus writes here about Dylan and get my interest.

I am sure this will not be a popular post, but then I am a music critic too! What do you expect?
Gavidor
Interesting book on Dylan and Greg Marcus's take on the artist. If you're a Dylan fan this is a must.
Gavidor
Interesting book on Dylan and Greg Marcus's take on the artist. If you're a Dylan fan this is a must.
Amerikan_Volga
yes!
Amerikan_Volga
yes!
Dandr
Not as good as Bob's "Chronicles: Volume One," but Greil thinks his own thoughts - a welcome personal failing and almost an anachronism.
Dandr
Not as good as Bob's "Chronicles: Volume One," but Greil thinks his own thoughts - a welcome personal failing and almost an anachronism.
Unsoo
Dylan fans bible
Unsoo
Dylan fans bible
Mythbusting--not Dylan, but Marcus. Used to think I was a fan. I cannot remember the last time i've read such an arrogant, self-serving and bitter diatribe by someone who apparently forgot that the author was not the subject matter. Marcus criticizes every single piece of writing by anyone else writing about Dylan, dismisses all of Dylan's early 70's work with such vitriol, it was uncomfortable, and goes off on long discourses on any angle he chooses, instead of just giving us the review. Much of the analysis is so self-aggrandizing, that it seemingly undermines Dylan's genius as a songwriter. Having trouble finishing it--especially after being warned away from the Sean Wilentz book, and finding it a much better read.
Mythbusting--not Dylan, but Marcus. Used to think I was a fan. I cannot remember the last time i've read such an arrogant, self-serving and bitter diatribe by someone who apparently forgot that the author was not the subject matter. Marcus criticizes every single piece of writing by anyone else writing about Dylan, dismisses all of Dylan's early 70's work with such vitriol, it was uncomfortable, and goes off on long discourses on any angle he chooses, instead of just giving us the review. Much of the analysis is so self-aggrandizing, that it seemingly undermines Dylan's genius as a songwriter. Having trouble finishing it--especially after being warned away from the Sean Wilentz book, and finding it a much better read.