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The Future of the Music Business: How to Succeed with the New Digital Technologies epub download

by Steve Gordon


The only advice I have for those in this new music industry, and it's free: Carve your own niche instead of trying to fit the ones sculpted by the suits.

The only advice I have for those in this new music industry, and it's free: Carve your own niche instead of trying to fit the ones sculpted by the suits. In these strange times where Kelly Clarkson, et. a. are unbelievably considered punk rock, we are definitely due for some big changes.

Music Pro Guide Books & DVDs). New technologies have revolutionized the music business

Music Pro Guide Books & DVDs). New technologies have revolutionized the music business. While these technologies have wrecked havoc on traditional business models, they've also provided new opportunities for music business entrepreneurs, as well as new challenges for musicians, recording artists, songwriters, record labels and music publishers.

New technologies are revolutionizing the music busi. Steve Gordon does a great job laying out the music industry in a comprehensive and readable manner. I would recommend this book and hope that Steve creates an updated version that explores the ways in which the streaming industry has changed since.

New technologies have revolutionized the music business. Part IV focuses on how to best use new technologies to succeed. While these technologies have wreaked havoc on traditional business models, they’ve also provided new opportunities for music business entrepreneurs, as well as new challenges for recording artists, songwriters, producers, record labels, and music publishers. This book is continually updated at ww. ess.

New technologies are revolutionizing the music business . The Future of the Music Business : How to Succeed with the New Digital Technologies: A Guide for Artists and Entrepreneurs.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Gordon Steve the Future . New techlogies are revolutionising the music business. Save on Non-Fiction Books. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days.

New techlogies are revolutionising the music business. While these changes may be smashing traditional business models and creating havoc among the major record companies, they are also providing new opportunities for unsigned artists, independent labels, and music business entrepreneurs.

Part IV focuses on how to best use new technologies to succeed. Steve Gordon is an entertainment attorney with over 20 years of experience

Part IV focuses on how to best use new technologies to succeed. The book is continuously updated at ww. The Future of the Music Business. Steve Gordon is an entertainment attorney with over 20 years of experience. He serve as an attorney at a law firm representing Atlantic and Elektra Records, as in-house counsel for a Hollywood movie studio, and has been Director of Business Affairs for Sony Music for more than 10 years.

A business and legal guide for people looking to sell music online, develop an online record company, create an Internet radio station, open an online music store, and use the new peer-to-peer networks and wireless technologies. Recently added by. erikdavidkov, CCMCollege, BrklynOutreach, jmorris501, BPLOutreach, josebat, gaidheal01, AmethystHJones, afrn.

Gordon is an entertainment lawyer, and offers additional insights on the legal aspects of online music including what .

Gordon is an entertainment lawyer, and offers additional insights on the legal aspects of online music including what to do if someone steals your songs, how to protect your band and label names, how to find a lawyer who specializes in music and how to land a record deal. The 350 page book also includes an accompanying DVD with a lecture titled How to Succeed in Today’s Music Business, delivered by Gordon at the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU. The Future of the Music Business is written for musicians, label owners and music business entrepreneurs. Get daily bass updates.

New technologies are revolutionizing the music business. While these changes may be smashing traditional business models, eroding CD sales, and creating havoc among the major record companies, they are also providing new opportunities for unsigned artists, independent labels, and music entrepreneurs. This book provides a legal and business roadmap as well as practical tips for people looking to: sell music online * develop an online record company * create an Internet radio station * open an online music store * use peer-to-peer networks to promote and sell music * take advantage of wireless technologies * and much more. The accompanying CD-ROM includes a two-hour seminar, additional interviews, and hundreds of active links to legal, business, and technical resources, plus links to web pages updating the book so it will never be out of date.

The Future of the Music Business: How to Succeed with the New Digital Technologies epub download

ISBN13: 978-0879308445

ISBN: 0879308443

Author: Steve Gordon

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Music

Language: English

Publisher: Backbeat Books (April 10, 2005)

Pages: 270 pages

ePUB size: 1228 kb

FB2 size: 1205 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 648

Other Formats: azw mbr lrf lrf

Related to The Future of the Music Business: How to Succeed with the New Digital Technologies ePub books

MilsoN
Pluses: Interviews, real-world knowledge of the ins and outs of the music business, how to make it big, promote yourself, sell music online.

Minuses: Some recent developments are a bit dated, but still good information. Focuses a lot on legal issues, copyright law, court cases that pit the big music labels and RIAA against those who threaten the status quo.

Overall, a good summary of the business environment and challenges (and opportunities) for music professionals in the current day.
MilsoN
Pluses: Interviews, real-world knowledge of the ins and outs of the music business, how to make it big, promote yourself, sell music online.

Minuses: Some recent developments are a bit dated, but still good information. Focuses a lot on legal issues, copyright law, court cases that pit the big music labels and RIAA against those who threaten the status quo.

Overall, a good summary of the business environment and challenges (and opportunities) for music professionals in the current day.
Marg
Great resource for any musician or indie band entering the recording and/or performing arts industry.The information is presented in layman's terms or defined when needed. This book is filled with valuable information that even seasoned musicians (I'm an AARP member) can use who are just starting to record and distribute music. Information on copyright law, licensing and promoting music via the web is presented in great detail. I reiterate: A great resource!
Marg
Great resource for any musician or indie band entering the recording and/or performing arts industry.The information is presented in layman's terms or defined when needed. This book is filled with valuable information that even seasoned musicians (I'm an AARP member) can use who are just starting to record and distribute music. Information on copyright law, licensing and promoting music via the web is presented in great detail. I reiterate: A great resource!
Truthcliff
A wonderful book. Very entertaining and helpful./
Truthcliff
A wonderful book. Very entertaining and helpful./
Yozshujind
Very complete book. I love it!
Yozshujind
Very complete book. I love it!
Steamy Ibis
Disappointed about the depth of this interview style book, but it cost $1 only which I shouldn't complain too much.
Steamy Ibis
Disappointed about the depth of this interview style book, but it cost $1 only which I shouldn't complain too much.
Grillador
Whether you are part of the vintage music scene, new to it or thinking of diving into today's music business environment head first, this book is a must read to gain valuable insights on where the industry has been and where it is going. I definitely recommend it..
Grillador
Whether you are part of the vintage music scene, new to it or thinking of diving into today's music business environment head first, this book is a must read to gain valuable insights on where the industry has been and where it is going. I definitely recommend it..
Unde
I spoke to the gentlemen who wrote this book after one of his public engagements. He told me point blank that "the only way to really make any money in the music industry is to sign with a major label". Interesting, considering he is selling this book to an audience of indie entrepreneurs.

But that's the whole point. He obviously hasn't signed anything good lately (listen to the radio), so why not write a book and tease the masses of people who so desperately want to make it? That's one way to make money when you haven't been able to cash in elsewhere, right?

After he told me to "go out and buy" his book, I went to the library to check it out. It turns out to be a collection of common sense advice that is just as easily found for free on the internet, things like "put a mailing list on your website" and "have buy buttons for your CDs all over your site" - gee, do I really need to pay money for this? Same goes for all the instructional drivel regarding licensing and other stuff---these things are very easily researched and found for nothing on the net, where it seems that everyone is an expert these days.

Don't waste your money or your time. Let sleeping music industry attorneys lie.
Unde
I spoke to the gentlemen who wrote this book after one of his public engagements. He told me point blank that "the only way to really make any money in the music industry is to sign with a major label". Interesting, considering he is selling this book to an audience of indie entrepreneurs.

But that's the whole point. He obviously hasn't signed anything good lately (listen to the radio), so why not write a book and tease the masses of people who so desperately want to make it? That's one way to make money when you haven't been able to cash in elsewhere, right?

After he told me to "go out and buy" his book, I went to the library to check it out. It turns out to be a collection of common sense advice that is just as easily found for free on the internet, things like "put a mailing list on your website" and "have buy buttons for your CDs all over your site" - gee, do I really need to pay money for this? Same goes for all the instructional drivel regarding licensing and other stuff---these things are very easily researched and found for nothing on the net, where it seems that everyone is an expert these days.

Don't waste your money or your time. Let sleeping music industry attorneys lie.
After reading these reviews and taking Anna Lee's very sage advice to try it via the library first, now I understand. It looks as if Mr. Gordon had several of his friends jump in and write reviews to get Ms. Lee's unfavorable review off the front page. Being the suspicious type, I checked out these reviewers, and they have all written only one review each, all giving Mr. Gordon five stars for his book, all within days of each other.

But no matter. Typical lawyer tactics don't impress me and neither did this typical lawyer's book. Having spent most of my adult life in the music industry in NYC and elsewhere, I have experienced just about everything in this business, and I am only sorry that Ms. Lee and so many others had to listen in person to this gentleman's spiel, as that's what The Future of the Music Business turns out to be: a spiel.

Yes, he has the requisite case studies with "indie" artists giving it a go on their own as an attempt to add cred to his manuscript, but Mr. Gordon (or perhaps his ghostwriter) knows nothing about digital technologies, that is apparent, nor does he offer his readers any new solutions. He is very much from the old school where the only game in town was the nearest major label that pulled all the purse strings. Now that the Internet has obliterated that, formerly holier-than-thou industry types are finding themselves at a real loss as for how to deal with it, and we see plenty of old dogs with half-a$$ed new tricks to push on the public.

The only advice I have for those in this new music industry, and it's free: Carve your own niche instead of trying to fit the ones sculpted by the suits. In these strange times where Kelly Clarkson, et. al., are unbelievably considered punk rock, we are definitely due for some big changes. The markets are changing with the emergence of India and China, not to mention a European Union with over 450 million people. Add the Internet to this mix and you have the opportunity for many niche markets to evolve without the current major label system as a constituent. The Internet is integrating into and changing the very nature of TV and radio as we know them, and amen to that.

Mr. Gordon deserves credit for one thing and one thing only: his book is no better or no worse than anything else out there.
After reading these reviews and taking Anna Lee's very sage advice to try it via the library first, now I understand. It looks as if Mr. Gordon had several of his friends jump in and write reviews to get Ms. Lee's unfavorable review off the front page. Being the suspicious type, I checked out these reviewers, and they have all written only one review each, all giving Mr. Gordon five stars for his book, all within days of each other.

But no matter. Typical lawyer tactics don't impress me and neither did this typical lawyer's book. Having spent most of my adult life in the music industry in NYC and elsewhere, I have experienced just about everything in this business, and I am only sorry that Ms. Lee and so many others had to listen in person to this gentleman's spiel, as that's what The Future of the Music Business turns out to be: a spiel.

Yes, he has the requisite case studies with "indie" artists giving it a go on their own as an attempt to add cred to his manuscript, but Mr. Gordon (or perhaps his ghostwriter) knows nothing about digital technologies, that is apparent, nor does he offer his readers any new solutions. He is very much from the old school where the only game in town was the nearest major label that pulled all the purse strings. Now that the Internet has obliterated that, formerly holier-than-thou industry types are finding themselves at a real loss as for how to deal with it, and we see plenty of old dogs with half-a$$ed new tricks to push on the public.

The only advice I have for those in this new music industry, and it's free: Carve your own niche instead of trying to fit the ones sculpted by the suits. In these strange times where Kelly Clarkson, et. al., are unbelievably considered punk rock, we are definitely due for some big changes. The markets are changing with the emergence of India and China, not to mention a European Union with over 450 million people. Add the Internet to this mix and you have the opportunity for many niche markets to evolve without the current major label system as a constituent. The Internet is integrating into and changing the very nature of TV and radio as we know them, and amen to that.

Mr. Gordon deserves credit for one thing and one thing only: his book is no better or no worse than anything else out there.