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No Direction Home: The Life And Music Of Bob Dylan epub download

by Robert Shelton


No Direction Home book.

No Direction Home book. Twenty-five years later, Shelton, who had followed Dylan's career faithfully, published No Direction Home.

No Direction Home: Bob Dylan is a 2005 documentary film by Martin Scorsese that traces the life of Bob Dylan, and his impact on 20th-century American popular music and culture. The film focuses on the period between Dylan's arrival in New York in January 1961 and his "retirement" from touring following his motorcycle accident in July 1966. This period encapsulates Dylan's rise to fame as a folk singer and songwriter, and the controversy surrounding his move to a rock style of music.

Bob Dylan - The 1966 Live Recordings: The Untold Story Behind The Recordings - Продолжительность .

Q u e e n Greatest Hits II Best Songs Full Album - Продолжительность: 1:15:32 We Bought A Masterpiece Recommended for you. 1:15:32. Bob Dylan Covers Robert Johnson.

Robert Shelton met Bob Dylan when the young singer first arrived in New York. He became Dylan's friend, champion

Robert Shelton met Bob Dylan when the young singer first arrived in New York. He became Dylan's friend, champion. -No Depression, The Roots Music Authority. Find images and videos about black and white, quotes and music on We Heart It - the app to get lost in what you love. I see myself sleeping. Singer One Folk Music Lps Bob Dylan Film Music Books Tech Companies Company Logo Biography Nonfiction Books. American Masters: No Direction Home: Bob Dylan S19E07 Screencapped by sixtiesstills, via Flickr. Find this Pin and more on DYLAN by sophie.

Robert Shelton met Bob Dylan when the young singer arrived in New York. He became Dylan's friend, champion, and critic. His book, first published in 1986, was hailed as the definitive unauthorised biography of this moody, passionate genius and his world. Of more than a thousand books published about Bob Dylan it is only this one that has been written with the Dylan's active cooperation

No Direction Home: The Life and Music of Bob Dylan. New York: Ballantine Books, 1986. Ramblin’ Rose: The Life and Career of Rose Maddox. Nashville: Country Music Foundation Press and Vanderbilt University Press, 1997. Chapter . Wren, Christopher.

No Direction Home: The Life and Music of Bob Dylan. Winners Got Scars Too: The Life and Legends of Johnny Cash. New York: Dial Press, 1971. Chapters 1–7, 9–15, 17–22. Zwonitzer, Mark, and Charles Hirshberg. Will You Miss Me When I’m Gone? The Carter Family and Their Legacy in American Music. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.

Twenty-five years later, Shelton, who had faithfully followed Dylan's career ever since, finally published No Direction Home.

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The Life and Music of Bob Dylan

The Life and Music of Bob Dylan. over as a mannered excess. But if not for every taste, his music-making has the mark of originality and inspiration.

Robert Shelton wrote the rave review of Bob Dylan in the New York Times that is generally credited with being the piece that "discovered" him in 1961. Twenty-five years later, Shelton, who had followed Dylan's career faithfully, published No Direction Home . Here is the "empathetic and rather magnificent" ( Washington Post Book World ) story of Dylan, musician and phenomenon.

No Direction Home: The Life And Music Of Bob Dylan epub download

ISBN13: 978-0306812873

ISBN: 0306812878

Author: Robert Shelton

Category: Arts and Photo

Subcategory: Music

Language: English

Publisher: Da Capo Press (July 9, 2003)

Pages: 576 pages

ePUB size: 1265 kb

FB2 size: 1485 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 779

Other Formats: lrf docx lit txt

Related to No Direction Home: The Life And Music Of Bob Dylan ePub books

Goldcrusher
This is not THE FIRST, but is THE MOST DETAILED BIO OF DYLAN THRU MID 80's t by the long time lead folk writer
for THE NEW YORK TIMES, Bob Shelton, born Shapiro, died in London, where his archives related to this and other books
on 'folk music,' which he wrote and published, now reside. One of the main ingredients which keeps one reading this author-centered
book is the continued access to intimate scenes, people, etc. such as access to Baez, Dylan's p arents and friends, and family, as well
as to other key scenes as Dylan moved from a Greenwich Village based folk singer, to a Nashville recording World Rock Star (with
Blonde on Blonde, recorded in Nashville, and now the center of the Dylan-Cash display there for the next year plus 2015on) and beyond.
Whether Dylan's (to this writer) clear reference to post - Holocaust scenes, and cultural criticism cast in the familiar blues formats of
mid-Western Chicago blues give enough clues to Dylan's connection with prophets like Isaiah or Amos. Of course this will be the longer perspective view of his work, probably not especially detailed until long after his death, which, like BB's, may be a decade or so away, or much further. While we're in this period of discussion of whether he was a singer, a songwriter, a poet, a metaphysical serious thinker, a theologically interesting figure, or just a wandering Jew from the Midwest with an harmonica strapped to his chest, this book will remain one of the top few Must Reads, for anyone interested in the discussion on the never ending Bob Dylan seminar...cheers for summer reading Howard Romaine
Goldcrusher
This is not THE FIRST, but is THE MOST DETAILED BIO OF DYLAN THRU MID 80's t by the long time lead folk writer
for THE NEW YORK TIMES, Bob Shelton, born Shapiro, died in London, where his archives related to this and other books
on 'folk music,' which he wrote and published, now reside. One of the main ingredients which keeps one reading this author-centered
book is the continued access to intimate scenes, people, etc. such as access to Baez, Dylan's p arents and friends, and family, as well
as to other key scenes as Dylan moved from a Greenwich Village based folk singer, to a Nashville recording World Rock Star (with
Blonde on Blonde, recorded in Nashville, and now the center of the Dylan-Cash display there for the next year plus 2015on) and beyond.
Whether Dylan's (to this writer) clear reference to post - Holocaust scenes, and cultural criticism cast in the familiar blues formats of
mid-Western Chicago blues give enough clues to Dylan's connection with prophets like Isaiah or Amos. Of course this will be the longer perspective view of his work, probably not especially detailed until long after his death, which, like BB's, may be a decade or so away, or much further. While we're in this period of discussion of whether he was a singer, a songwriter, a poet, a metaphysical serious thinker, a theologically interesting figure, or just a wandering Jew from the Midwest with an harmonica strapped to his chest, this book will remain one of the top few Must Reads, for anyone interested in the discussion on the never ending Bob Dylan seminar...cheers for summer reading Howard Romaine
Dorintrius
A detailed and generous book that is both tactful, in your face, subtle, and honest. If you plan to read a book about Bob Dylan I'd select this one and then I'd set aside a lot of time to read it. Shelton had the rare dual perspective of being both a friend of Dylan's and the skills of an objective journalist so he could maintain a professional distance from his subject. Going from Hibbing to Blood on the Tracks, Shelton works to give the reader details, contexts, analysis, and personal information unlike any other volume on Dylan. The only problem is the story ends far too early. Dylan went through even more experiences after Blood on the Tracks but, sadly, Shelton died before having the opportunity to write a second volume to this necessary work.
Dorintrius
A detailed and generous book that is both tactful, in your face, subtle, and honest. If you plan to read a book about Bob Dylan I'd select this one and then I'd set aside a lot of time to read it. Shelton had the rare dual perspective of being both a friend of Dylan's and the skills of an objective journalist so he could maintain a professional distance from his subject. Going from Hibbing to Blood on the Tracks, Shelton works to give the reader details, contexts, analysis, and personal information unlike any other volume on Dylan. The only problem is the story ends far too early. Dylan went through even more experiences after Blood on the Tracks but, sadly, Shelton died before having the opportunity to write a second volume to this necessary work.
Jube
If you are going to read about Bob Dylan, this is really the only place to start. Every other biography is and must be based on Shelton, who came closer by far to Dylan and his crowd than any other biographer. This edition is also complemented by a complete discography that lists every song on every album and by a time line that goes beyond the book's ending point in the late 70s, bring it up to 2011. This book is extremely well researched and extremely well-written by a writer with great empathy for Dylan's artistic and humanistic spirit. There are other good analyses of Dylan and his myriad of influences and his influence, but you need to read this first to have a basis for understanding him and his achievements.

I've been listening to Dylan on and off and runnin' hot and cold since the mid-Sixties. Sometimes I've heard the music and it has touched me so that I wept. At other times, Dylan's words have rung true for my generation, at least the more radical and compassionate among us. Then again, there have been years, nay decades, when I struggled to find one song on three or four albums that spoke to me or made my feet wander across the floor.

Robert Shelton's biography of Dylan was much more than I had imagined it to be, revealing intimate details, illuminating dark corners, unveiling rough edges, all while honoring Dylan's extraordinary spirit and enigmatic personality. At times when Dylan shucked and jived every reporter and writer and human being who approached him, there were moments when he allowed Shelton to come closer. This includes allowing Shelton to interview the Zimmermans, the only journalist ever given such access. Shelton also became a regular, if on again and off again, friend and companion to the rapidly evolving Dylan over the course of more than a dozen years. Shelton was not merely a writer looking in, but he hung out with Dylan, his friends, his girlfriends and his bands.

One senses that Shelton's own artistry and personal struggles--he was caught up in the Red Scares of the late 50s and early 60s--helped him to understand Dylan, perhaps America's greatest musical artist. The image of Dylan which emerges is complex, nuanced. We see Dylan evolving so rapidly in his song-smithing and artist persona that even his closest friends and family barely recognized him after not seeing him for a mere six months. We see Dylan struggle with fame and glorification, simultaneously relishing and violently rejecting the pedestal he is placed on by his fans and critics. Shelton reveals the boiling intensity with which Dylan dealt with everyone in his life, an intensity borne of creative integrity, overweening ambition, surrealistic ideology, and flailing neuroses, that leaves the hero alone and lonely repeatedly. And we see Dylan grasping at the words and visions that come from his unconsciousness, sometimes at his behest, but often unbidden. Shelton is sometimes right there with him, trying to unravel the meaning of Dylan's rhythmic thought dreams.

By the time I finished this Biblical length and depth of a book, while I knew Dylan better, he was still a mystery to me. Beyond his incredible creativity, I also saw what a human, all too human individual he was and is. So: Great Man, Great Book about him--Read it!
Jube
If you are going to read about Bob Dylan, this is really the only place to start. Every other biography is and must be based on Shelton, who came closer by far to Dylan and his crowd than any other biographer. This edition is also complemented by a complete discography that lists every song on every album and by a time line that goes beyond the book's ending point in the late 70s, bring it up to 2011. This book is extremely well researched and extremely well-written by a writer with great empathy for Dylan's artistic and humanistic spirit. There are other good analyses of Dylan and his myriad of influences and his influence, but you need to read this first to have a basis for understanding him and his achievements.

I've been listening to Dylan on and off and runnin' hot and cold since the mid-Sixties. Sometimes I've heard the music and it has touched me so that I wept. At other times, Dylan's words have rung true for my generation, at least the more radical and compassionate among us. Then again, there have been years, nay decades, when I struggled to find one song on three or four albums that spoke to me or made my feet wander across the floor.

Robert Shelton's biography of Dylan was much more than I had imagined it to be, revealing intimate details, illuminating dark corners, unveiling rough edges, all while honoring Dylan's extraordinary spirit and enigmatic personality. At times when Dylan shucked and jived every reporter and writer and human being who approached him, there were moments when he allowed Shelton to come closer. This includes allowing Shelton to interview the Zimmermans, the only journalist ever given such access. Shelton also became a regular, if on again and off again, friend and companion to the rapidly evolving Dylan over the course of more than a dozen years. Shelton was not merely a writer looking in, but he hung out with Dylan, his friends, his girlfriends and his bands.

One senses that Shelton's own artistry and personal struggles--he was caught up in the Red Scares of the late 50s and early 60s--helped him to understand Dylan, perhaps America's greatest musical artist. The image of Dylan which emerges is complex, nuanced. We see Dylan evolving so rapidly in his song-smithing and artist persona that even his closest friends and family barely recognized him after not seeing him for a mere six months. We see Dylan struggle with fame and glorification, simultaneously relishing and violently rejecting the pedestal he is placed on by his fans and critics. Shelton reveals the boiling intensity with which Dylan dealt with everyone in his life, an intensity borne of creative integrity, overweening ambition, surrealistic ideology, and flailing neuroses, that leaves the hero alone and lonely repeatedly. And we see Dylan grasping at the words and visions that come from his unconsciousness, sometimes at his behest, but often unbidden. Shelton is sometimes right there with him, trying to unravel the meaning of Dylan's rhythmic thought dreams.

By the time I finished this Biblical length and depth of a book, while I knew Dylan better, he was still a mystery to me. Beyond his incredible creativity, I also saw what a human, all too human individual he was and is. So: Great Man, Great Book about him--Read it!
Reggy
Who is Bob Dylan? None of the biographies I've read - Sounes, Heylin, Scaduto, and a short book by Toby Thompson (1971) - are by people that really knew him. Shelton is the New York Times reviewer who heard Dylan play in a Greenwich Village coffee house not too long after he came to NY and wrote a very promising review about him, which helped him on his way... Shelton also got to know him, spent time with him, and was able to piece many things together and interview people that were not mentioned in the other books. The interviews and stories are interesting and informative, fill in gaps left by the other books, and we get more of a feeling of Dylan, especially before he came to NY and as he was developing. This is a very well written book. Fans will like it a lot.
Reggy
Who is Bob Dylan? None of the biographies I've read - Sounes, Heylin, Scaduto, and a short book by Toby Thompson (1971) - are by people that really knew him. Shelton is the New York Times reviewer who heard Dylan play in a Greenwich Village coffee house not too long after he came to NY and wrote a very promising review about him, which helped him on his way... Shelton also got to know him, spent time with him, and was able to piece many things together and interview people that were not mentioned in the other books. The interviews and stories are interesting and informative, fill in gaps left by the other books, and we get more of a feeling of Dylan, especially before he came to NY and as he was developing. This is a very well written book. Fans will like it a lot.
Ironfire
A bit too academic for the subject matter. If you want a scholarly treatise, this is it.
Ironfire
A bit too academic for the subject matter. If you want a scholarly treatise, this is it.
Whitescar
It's great having this book on a kindle. Love it.
Whitescar
It's great having this book on a kindle. Love it.
Unnis
This was very well written, I have followed his life, enjoyed his music, been to concerts, and felt he was deep and brilliant. The author came across as fair and balanced, not sensationalizing, trying to portray the essence of Dylan
Unnis
This was very well written, I have followed his life, enjoyed his music, been to concerts, and felt he was deep and brilliant. The author came across as fair and balanced, not sensationalizing, trying to portray the essence of Dylan
Great book about an unbelievable artist.
Great book about an unbelievable artist.